Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Change Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Change Management

1,245

Published on

On the dimensions of change management. Originally presented June 1994.

On the dimensions of change management. Originally presented June 1994.

Published in: Business, Technology
1 Comment
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Very interesting presentation! Thanks a lot. I would truly appreciate if you could send me the electronic version (apand@wp.pl). Thanks very much
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,245
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
1
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Presentation This presentation is intended to provoke debate. History An earlier version was prepared by Richard Veryard for the joint ECP/Odissey meeting on June 7, 1994.
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000 Sea Change Shakespeare’s tempestual trope has become a popular but ill-thought-through cliché. What is a sea change? Is it a change undergone by the sea, or by that which comes into contact with the sea? On the surface, the sea alternates between violent storms (The Tempest) and peaceful innocence. Molecules of water and ions of salt are sometimes tossed around but remain whole. Deeper and longer-term, oceans are largely unaffected by storms. Meanwhile, defences against the sea are torn apart, and objects exposed to salt water are quickly corroded; bright but lifeless metal, for example, is turned to a rich green. Biological change Genes are mutated, individuals are born to test out the new gene configuration, successful gene configurations survive and perpetuate themselves, species evolve, inter-species ecologies evolve Psychological development: A child uses a transitional object (such as a teddy bear) to move from a position of emotional dependence (on the mother) to a more grown-up position. (This has been analysed by Winnecott. See also Marris.)
  • These three notions of (demanding) change provide an important counterweight to the three notions of (demanding) security I have described elsewhere.
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000 Change as Object If we suppose that a change is an object, then we have many ways of thinking about the things that changes do for us, the things they do to us, and the things they do to themselves (and each other).
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000 Granularity of change management The term ‘change management’ is understood differently by different people, or in different contexts.
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000 Reflecting deeply about change, whether in business, social or personal affairs, takes us back to the ancients - the Chinese and the Greeks. Among the ancient Greeks, Heraclitus is commonly quoted as the philosopher of change. "All is flux." "The only constant is change" This is how Plato interprets Heraclitus - but it's at best a partial view of a complex and paradoxical philosopher. A careful reading of Heraclitus reveals him as focusing, not on things as constantly changing, but on things as constant while changing. He is therefore an invaluable touchstone for practical thinking about change in relation to organizations, people and technology.
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000 Example ODP as an example of technology
  • Page © Copyright 2000 Veryard Projects Ltd Software Strategies for Business Survival January 2000
  • Transcript

    • 1. Next Practice Research Initiative http:// npri.wikispaces.com Change Management
    • 2. Contents of presentation <ul><li>Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Some different ways of thinking about change </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance to world of technology </li></ul><ul><li>Towards practical solutions </li></ul>
    • 3. Motivation Change is a process affecting people and organizations using technologies. The Process of Change How does change happen? How can the participants engage creatively and positively with change? The Purpose of Change What are the requirements for change? Where do these requirements come from? How can they be managed? The Material of Change What are the components of effective change? How can they be assembled? The Form of Change Understanding change. What kinds of change are there? How can new forms of change be created?
    • 4. Metaphors of change <ul><li>“… suffer a sea change into something rich and strange …” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>waves / tides / tidal waves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>drowning / flooding / sinking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>erosion / corrosion / accretion / metamorphosis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“… wizard of changes teach me the lesson of flowing …” </li></ul><ul><li>from mutation via adaptation to evolution </li></ul><ul><li>via transitional objects towards maturity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>consultant as teddy bear </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Notions of (demanding) change A hybrid of the first two notions - in which certain paths are &quot;downhill&quot; and others are &quot;uphill&quot;. Navigating a complex space, where each place or state gives you access to certain other places or states, and visibility of some further places or states not directly accessible. Going from a current state (AS-IS) to a desired state (TO-BE) – immediately, in a series of linear steps, or in a roundabout fashion. This leads to a hedonic approach to change, which also includes notions of pleasure and resistance . change as landscape This is a topological way of conceiving change. change as maze This is a programmatic notion of change. change as path
    • 6. What do changes do? <ul><li>they improve (but have side-effects) </li></ul><ul><li>they solve problems (but create new ones) </li></ul><ul><li>they infect / excite / ripple </li></ul><ul><li>they have a life-cycle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>conception / birth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>peak performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>decay / decease </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>metempsychosis / rebirth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>they penetrate organizations / systems </li></ul><ul><li>they alter our perceptions of reality </li></ul><ul><li>they change themselves </li></ul>
    • 7. What is change management? <ul><li>Managing a change </li></ul><ul><li>Managing change s </li></ul><ul><li>Managing the quantity of change </li></ul><ul><li>Managing the quality of change </li></ul><ul><li>Managing something against change(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Changing the management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or whatever </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. Managing a change <ul><li>A change can be classified </li></ul><ul><ul><li>large / small </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>complex / simple </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>difficult / easy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reversible / irreversible </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A change can be performed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>task requiring measurable effort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can appear on schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>responsibility delegated to person or team </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A change can be monitored </li></ul><ul><ul><li>we can assess whether it has happened, whether it has been effective, and whether it was worth doing </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. Managing change s <ul><li>Changes interact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>mutual support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>conflict </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>one change modifies another change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Changes are inseparable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>coordination of decision, performance, assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Changes can be sequenced and ranked </li></ul><ul><ul><li>important / urgent / dependent </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Changes can be bundled </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clusters of interconnected changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Log-rolling to get enough political support (coalition) </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. Managing the quantity of change <ul><li>Avoiding overloading yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling the pace / agenda of change </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing the adaptability of the organization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ability to assimilate change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ability to accommodate itself to change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Trying to overload your competitors </li></ul>
    • 11. Managing the quality of change <ul><li>deep / superficial </li></ul><ul><li>lasting / transient </li></ul><ul><li>meaningful / trivial </li></ul><ul><li>positive trends: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>maturity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>flexibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>organizational intelligence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>progressive (Whig) </li></ul></ul>
    • 12. Managing something against change(s) <ul><li>If change is a  p, shouldn’t we give at least as much attention to the p as to the  ? </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore focus on the thing being changed - what are the desired / actual continuities of this thing? </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the unchanging in the face of change(s) </li></ul>
    • 13. Paradoxes of change <ul><li>Is there anything unchanging? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Heraclitus </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It’s not the size that counts. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chaos theory - Butterfly effect </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flexibility requires commitment </li></ul>
    • 14. Relevance to world of technology <ul><li>Technology enables a certain class of change to certain classes of object </li></ul><ul><li>Technology enables a certain kind of flexibility for certain classes of object </li></ul><ul><li>Technology enables larger and more complex objects to be created </li></ul><ul><li>This increase in complexity and scale may more than use up the extra adaptability offered by technology! </li></ul>
    • 15. The Process of Change We can understand change in terms of shifting structures of energy, power, knowledge and truth. Truth is what lies underneath change. Each change reveals some aspects of the truth, and conceals others. (As with the carpet in a furnished apartment: you can move the furniture around, but you can never see all the carpet at the same time.) Each newly uncovered truth releases new energies for another cycle of change. Knowledge is what guides and structures change. This knowledge will often be packaged as recipes or procedures or general schemata, in which case it verges on the technological. Includes ‘know-how’ (i.e. skills) as well as ‘know-that’ (information). Power is what masters and controls change. Some of this power and authority may be vested in formal management structures, but some of it may be dispersed through the organization and its environment. Energy is what drives and motivates change. There are various sources of energy, in both positive and negative forms.
    • 16. Towards practical solutions <ul><li>Technology vendors and consultants therefore need to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>identify the planning issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>recognize good migration tactics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>encapsulate these patterns into products, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ensure this planning is supported by methods and services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What does ‘practical’ mean? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>executable with reasonable effort and without unacceptable risk? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>applicable to ‘real’ problems? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>teachable to ordinary technical people? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>supported by tools? </li></ul></ul>
    • 17. Presentation History <ul><li>An earlier version of this presentation was prepared by Richard Veryard within the Enterprise Computing Project for the joint ECP/Odissey meeting on June 7, 1994. </li></ul>

    ×