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Gehazi Missing the Mark
 

Gehazi Missing the Mark

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    Gehazi Missing the Mark Gehazi Missing the Mark Presentation Transcript

    • SDA Quarterly December 11-17, 2010 Gehazi: Missing the Mark
    • Material Presented
      • The material presented is additional study which needs sincere prayer , the Holy Spirit and the Word of God . Please remember these scriptures:
      • “ It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man.” (Psa.118.8)
      • “ Thus saith the LORD; Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the LORD.” (Jer.17.5)
    • Blessed KJV 1611 Bible
      • “It is the first and highest duty of every rational being to learn from the Scriptures what is truth , and then to walk in the light and encourage others to follow his example . We should day by day study the Bible diligently , weighing every thought and comparing scripture with scripture . With divine help we are to form our opinions for ourselves as we are to answer for ourselves before God .” (GC.598.002)
    • Unwarned
      • “ When God has given us light showing the dangers before us , how can we stand clear in His sight if we neglect to put forth every effort in our power to bring it before the people ? Can we be content to leave them to meet this momentous issue unwarned ?” (5T.712.002)
    • Bible Its Own Expositor
      • “ In every place God is working to bring men to a knowledge of God and His righteousness . He speaks to them in His Word . The Bible is the key which unlocks the mysteries which it is essential for human beings to understand in order to know what they must do to gain eternal life . The Bible is its own expositor . Its bright beams are to shine in all parts of the world that sin may be revealed . The Bible is a chart pointing out the way-marks of truth . Those who are acquainted with this chart will be enabled to tread with certainty the path of duty wherever they may be called to go .” (WB.1902-09-09.011)
    • Avoid Controversy
      • While Christians are not to sacrifice one principle of truth , they should avoid controversy whenever it is possible to do so . (DA.434.004)
      • Your solemn challenge is “ study to show thyself approved unto God , a workman that needeth not to be ashamed , rightly dividing the word of truth .” 2Tim.2.15.
      • May God Abundantly Bless Each Student
    • Memory Verse KJV & niv
      • Deut.13.4
      • Ye shall walk after the LORD your God , and fear him , and keep his commandments , and obey his voice , and ye shall serve him , and cleave unto him .
      • “ It is the Lord your God you must follow, and him you must revere. Keep his commands and obey him; serve him and hold fast to him” (NIV)
    • Gehazi Hebrew Meaning
      • Gehazi ( ge®-ha ' z ). [Heb. GeÆchazéÆ , meaning uncertain .] Elishas servant. He appears first in favorable light when he showed sympathy with a childless Shunammite woman (2 Ki 4:14), and when he showed zeal for the honor of the prophet, who he thought was not being shown the proper respect (v 27). Later he is pictured as covetous and lying. To Naaman, the Syrian commander whom Elisha had healed of leprosy, he made it appear that the prophet had broken his word. As punishment the leprosy of Naaman fell on him (ch 5:20–27). His meeting with the king of Israel after a seven-year famine (ch 8:4–6) seems to have occurred before he was punished with perpetual leprosy.
        • Horn, Siegfried H., Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1979.
    • Greetings
      • Greetings. Many forms of greetings are recorded in the Bible , such as, “God be gracious unto thee” (Gen 43:29); “The Lord be with you” (Ruth 2:4); “Peace be to this house” (Lk 10:5). Greetings frequently took the form of, or were accompanied by, kisses (Gen 48:10; Ex 18:7; etc.). Customarily the cheek, forehead, beard, hands, or feet were kissed. In the NT the term “holy kiss” is sometimes found, indicating a token of Christian affection among believers (Rom 16:16; 1 Cor 16:20; 1 Th 5:26). Judas used a kiss to betray the Saviour (Mt. 26:49; cf. Prov 27:6). Paul’s letters abound with greetings from himself and those with him to friends and fellow laborers in the churches addressed (Rom 16:3–16; 1 Cor 16:20; 2 Cor 13:12; Php 4:21; 1 Pe 5:14; 3 Jn 14; etc.).
        • Horn, Siegfried H., Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1979.
    • Greetings (cont’d)
      • Greetings… The scribes and Pharisees fell under condemnation for their egocentric love of “greetings in the markets,” which were doubtless involved and time consuming, as Oriental salutations sometimes are (Mt 23:7; Lk 11:43). It was probably because of the time involved in ancient greetings that Elisha , sending his servant Gehazi to lay a staff upon the dead son of the Shunammite woman , directed him to salute no one (2 Ki 4:29). Similarly, when Christ sent out the Seventy He told them to “ salute no man by the way ” (Lk 10:4), probably to impress upon them a sense of urgency in their preaching of the gospel . Elsewhere Christ admonished His followers not to be exclusive in their greetings, but that all, Jew and Gentile, friend and enemy, were to be regarded as brethren (Mt 5:43–47).
        • Horn, Siegfried H., Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1979.
    • Stand Before the Lord
      • Stand before the Lord. (Deuteronomy 10:8) This is a phrase that denotes consecrated devotion to the Lord’s service , in public ministry. They ministered to God as court officials did before a king. The priests were responsible to God. It is used also of the prophets as ministers of God (1 Kings 17:1; 18:15). It is used also of the attendance of Gehazi upon the prophet Elisha (2 Kings 5:25).
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 4:31
      • 31. Neither voice, nor hearing. (2 Kings 4:31) These words imply that Gehazi had expected God to honor the placing of Elisha’s staff upon the lad . Why life was not restored we are not told . Perhaps if the woman had had faith that the Lord would answer her through the agency of Elisha’s staff and his servant Gehazi, the answer would have come that way. Or perhaps there was some weakness in the life of Gehazi that prevented the Lord from using him as a channel for the performance of His wonderful deeds of power . It is not given man to know the reasons why the Lord does or does not choose to work in certain ways .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:20
      • 20. But Gehazi. The Biblical writer has just given a beautiful picture of an important Syrian official leaving Israel as a new convert to Jehovah, with joy and peace in his heart, healed of leprosy and converted in spirit. But the scene changes abruptly with the words, “But Gehazi.” When God gives men happiness and peace , Satan attempts to introduce trouble . Into every symphony he seeks to introduce a discordant note . Here the servant of the prophet allows himself to become a tool in the enemy’s hand to all but spoil the picture so beautifully drawn .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:20
      • Hath spared Naaman. These words reveal the thoughts and spirit of Gehazi . He thought of Naaman not as a new convert to God but as a soldier from an enemy land . The Syrians had spoiled Israel ; why should an Israelite now spare one of them ? Gehazi probably thought of his master Elisha as weak and simple-minded in refusing to take from Naaman the gift he was so willing to give .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:20
      • As the Lord liveth. These words are here a profane oath , uttered by a man who is trying to persuade himself that he is doing something in the service of God when he knows full well that he is doing wrong . Blinded by avarice , Gehazi will take pay for services he did not perform , from a man from whom Elisha believed he should accept nothing .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:21
      • 21. Lighted down. This was an Oriental mark of respect . Gehazi was , after all , only the servant of Elisha , and Naaman was under no obligations to show him this uncalled-for courtesy . But it indicates the strong feeling of gratitude that welled within his breast . Naaman had conquered his natural pride and animosity , and now the commander of the armies of Syria , which had been victorious over Israel , descends from his chariot that he may deal on terms of equality with the servant of a Hebrew prophet .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:21
      • Is all well? Naaman was startled as he saw Gehazi running , and must have thought that some ill had befallen the prophet or that some other calamity had occurred .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:22
      • 22. My master hath sent me. Gehazi now sought to cloak his avarice with a lie . Elisha was to be made responsible for the servant’s greed . The worthy name of the unselfish prophet was to be defamed by the cupidity of his unworthy servant . One sin rarely stands alone , for evil always leads the way to more and greater evil .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:22
      • Two young men. Gehazi did not wish to be recognized as displaying his greed . Rather , he would play the part of a friend concerned about two young men in need . Would not Naaman be interested in them to the extent of assisting them with one of his ten talents of silver and two of his ten changes of raiment ?
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:23
      • 23. Be content. The meaning is, “please,” or, “ kindly consent to ,” take not one talent but two . The grateful Naaman would give double that which Gehazi had asked for , and he would also send two of his servants to bear the burden to the prophet’s home .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:24
      • 24. The tower. Heb. Ôophel , a “mound” or “hill”; often the structure on the hill whether a watchtower, a house, a fort, or a lookout point. Elisha had his home in Samaria, probably on an eminence from which he could see men approaching afar (see ch. 6:30–32). But on this occasion Gehazi , returning with the two talents of silver , did not wish to be seen by his master . So the hill here referred to seems to have been one between the home of Elisha and the place where Gehazi overtook Naaman, which interrupted the view. At that place Naaman’s servants were dismissed and Gehazi received the treasure and placed it in hiding.
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Ophel
      • Ophel ( o ' fe¬l ). [Heb. ÔOphel , “knoll.”]
      • 1. A part of Jerusalem. From Neh 3:26, 27 and several statements of Josephus ( War ii. 17. 9; v. 4. 1, 2; v. 6. 1; vi. 6. 3) it seems certain that Ophel was part of the eastern hill of Jerusalem, an area immediately south of the Temple. Jerusalem From 20 B.C. to A.D. 70; see The Walls of Jerusalem in Ancient and Modern Times. King Jotham did some building on the wall of Ophel, and Manasseh increased its height (2 Chr 27:3; 33:14). The Nethinim, or Temple servants, had their residence in this quarter (Neh 3:26; 11:21). The Hebrew term is found in Mic 4:8 as part of “Zion” and is rendered “strong hold” in the KJV and “hill” in the RSV; also in Is 32:14, where it is rendered “forts” in the KJV and “hill” in the RSV, and where its destruction is predicted.
        • Horn, Siegfried H., Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1979.
    • Ophel
      • Ophel ( o ' fe¬l ). [Heb. ÔOphel , “knoll.”]
      • 2. An Ôophel is also mentioned at Samaria (2 Ki 5:24, rendered “tower” in the KJV, “hill” in the RSV), as the place where Gehazi deposited the gifts received from Naaman . King Mesha of Moab says that he built the wall of Ôophel in one of his cities (*Moabite Stone, line 22, usually rendered “citadel” in English translations).
        • Horn, Siegfried H., Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1979.
    • 2 Kings 5:25
      • 25. Went no whither. To shield himself from his master’s censure, Gehazi now resorted to another falsehood . Again sin led to sin , and one lie to another . The trail of evil has no end . He who embarks upon a course of deception will inevitably find himself engaging in deception to cover up deception .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:26
      • 26. Went not mine heart? The Lord had revealed to Elisha exactly what had taken place , how Gehazi had run out after Naaman , how he had lied to him and had succeeded in securing the coveted gift , and how it had been hidden . Man may lie to his fellow men, but he cannot lie to God . Deeds of evil may be hidden from the eyes of man, but the eyes of the Lord see all (see Heb. 4:13).
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:26
      • It is a time to receive money? What a terrible rebuke the words of Elisha brought home to the heart of his servant! A notable miracle had been performed. The commander of the armies of Syria had been brought to believe in God and to rejoice in his new-found faith . God had been gracious to His servants , and heaven had come very close to earth . Gehazi’s heart should have been uplifted in praise and thanksgiving to God for the wonderful blessings received . He should have thought of how Naaman’s heart might be favorably impressed and how the Syrian commander might be brought to feel that the faith of the Israelites was the world’s only true religion which made men unselfish , honest, and kind. But instead he thought only of himself and of his own interests .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:26 (cont’d)
      • It is a time to receive money? … Elisha’s words of rebuke were not only for his servant Gehazi but for those in God’s church today who manifest the same spirit as did Gehazi . In our day God has again been very near , and wonderful miracles of grace have been wrought in many lands . Sinners everywhere are being reclaimed and songs of thanksgiving and victory are ascending to God . But once more in the hearts of some the spirit of avarice and greed has been allowed to prevail . They are engaged in the service of self . Silver is being hoarded and hidden that should be employed toward the salvation of men . Once more God is looking down from heaven , and the question is asked, “ Is it a time to receive money, and to receive garments ?”
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:26 (cont’d)
      • Oliveyards. Gehazi had been thinking of the disposition he would make of his wealth , and the prophet here probably enumerates the purchases his servant intended to make .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:27
      • 27. Cleave unto thee. The day that brought so great a blessing to Naaman the Syrian brought a terrible curse to the Hebrew servant of the prophet of God . Naaman went on his way in peace , his heart rejoicing in his new hope in God . Gehazi carried the results of his sin to his grave . He remained a leper to the day of his death , cursed by Heaven , despised by his fellow men , an object lesson for all time to come of the folly of greed and the emptiness of a life that seeks first the treasures of this world rather than the treasures of the kingdom of God . During his years of fellowship with Elisha, Gehazi had had the opportunity of learning lessons of the joy and satisfaction of a life of unselfish devotion and love . Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:27 (cont’d)
      • 27. Cleave unto thee… But he had failed to learn his lesson . The gifts of Heaven were spurned while he reached out for earthly treasure , which, like cancer , eats away the souls of men . Instead of developing a spirit of self-denial while engaged in the service of God , he had allowed himself to become selfish and interested in material gain . His interest was in shekels of silver rather than in the souls of men , in garments of linen rather than in garments of righteousness .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:27
      • For ever. It must not be thought that because of the sin of Gehazi , God was pronouncing a curse upon his posterity that would endure for all time . The Lord is kind and merciful and never brings unjust or unnecessary affliction upon anyone . Gehazi, because of his greed , had brought a dreadful judgment upon himself . Because of that judgment his children would be forced to suffer . Disease and its effects are often passed on to an innocent posterity . But to say that because Gehazi became a leper , his descendants throughout all the ages to come would likewise be lepers , is to say something that is not true .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:27
      • The Hebrew expression here used, leÔolam , does not necessarily mean without cessation, or to all eternity. The word Ôolam , when applied to God , means without end ; when applied to man’s life , it extends only to the end of human existence . In Ex. 21:6 a servant was to serve his master “ for ever .” Of the strangers that sojourned in their land the Israelites were to make “ bondmen for ever ” (Lev. 25:46). Shortly before the death of David, Bath-sheba bowed herself before the king with the words, “Let my lord king David live for ever” (1 Kings 1:31). So also Nehemiah said to King Artaxerxes, “Let the king live for ever” (Neh. 2:3).
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 5:27 (cont’d)
      • The smoke of the earth in the day of the Lord’s vengeance is described as going “ up for ever ” (Isa. 34:10). When Jonah pictured his descent into the belly of the whale, he said that the bars of the earth were about him “for ever” (Jonah 2:6). The expression leÔolam simply means “age lasting,” and the length of time involved must be deduced from the particular idea with which the expression is associated (see on Ex. 12:14; 21:6).
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • 2 Kings 8:5
      • 5. As he was telling. At the dramatic moment when Gehazi was telling the king how the Shunammite woman’s son had been restored from death to life , the woman herself came in . Incidents such as this do not just happen . God lives and has a part in the daily affairs of His children on earth . Guardian angels are ever at work to protect and direct the steps of those under their charge into pathways of success and blessing . The same Lord who spoke through Elisha worked through His angel messengers to direct the woman of Shunem to the palace of the king at exactly the right moment, when her plea would prove most effective
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Acts 5:2
      • The approval with which Luke tells the story of the self-sacrifice of Barnabas must have reflected the approval of the church . Ananias apparently thought that he could gain the same approval , but with less sacrifice on his part . The desire to please was strong enough to gain a partial victory over greed . But greed was strong enough to triumph over honesty . The impulse to sell came from the Spirit of God ; the impulse to retain part of the price was evil . The act was an attempt to serve both God and mammon . The sin was in some respects like that of Gehazi (see on 2 Kings 5:20–27), but seen against the background of the miracles of Pentecost and the extraordinary progress of the church under the Spirit’s guidance , it was more heinous and was visited with severer punishment .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Health Prospective
      • THE FOLLOWING INSIGHTS ARE ON LEPROSY REFERRED IN GEHAZI’S CURSE AND WORTH MENTIONING AND TAKEN FROM LEVITICUS CHAPTER 13 AND 14
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • Many of the symptoms listed in this chapter for various types of “leprosy” are different from the symptoms of the disease now commonly known by that name. Furthermore, Mosaic provisions for ceremonial cleansing imply that those suffering from some forms of “ leprosy ” recovered in a short time . Until recently no way was known to treat true leprosy successfully.
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • The word translated “leprosy” is from the Heb. saraÔ , which means to “ strike down .” A person afflicted with “l eprosy ” was stricken down , presumably as a divine punishment for sinful acts . This was true in the cases of Miriam (Num. 12:10), Gehazi (2 Kings 5:27), Uzziah (2 Kings 15:5). In other cases mentioned in the OT it is not clear whether this principle holds true (2 Kings 5:1; 7:3). Gesenius considers that saraÔ is interchangeable with garaÔ , and thus contains the idea of scabbiness. The Greek word lepros , from which our word leprosy comes, meant “scaly,” “scabby,” “rough.” Modern leprosy , elephantiasis graecorum , is of three kinds , lepra tuberculoides , characterized by tubercles , lepra maculosa , characterized by spots or streaks , and lepra anaesthetica , or that which affects the nervous system .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • It seems most probable that the “leprosy” of Lev. 13 is a general term descriptive of various skin diseases , such as psoriasis and vitiligo , as well as true leprosy. Most of the symptoms here described more closely resemble lepra mosaica , or psoriasis. The “rising” mentioned in v. 2 may be similar to the tubercles characteristic of lepra tuberculoides or possibly lepra anaesthetica . The “bright spot” repeatedly mentioned is thought by some to resemble vitiligo, a tropical disease of which this is a distinctive symptom . In vitiligo the hairs of the affected parts turn white , as in v. 3. The disease begins as small patches , spreads , and often involves large areas of the skin . It is harmless , but disfigures the appearance , particularly of those with a swarthy complexion .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • The fact that there are variations in the symptoms of the “leprosy” mentioned in this chapter, further supports the idea that several diseases which strikingly affected the skin are included under the general term “ leprosy .” In a day when medical science as such did not exist it would have been a difficult thing for the priests to give a differential diagnosis of various diseases affecting the skin , when they were in many respects similar , and for which there were no specific names . Moses apparently grouped these related diseases under one general head , saraÔ , which our English versions have translated “leprosy.”
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • The idea of quarantining those afflicted with contagious diseases seems to have originated with the Hebrew people , a safeguard given them by God Himself . It has been thought by some that the Biblical idea of segregating persons having “ leprosy ” led to the medieval practice of isolating those with true leprosy . Some commentators have held that true leprosy originated in Egypt , but its origin is unknown . Long before Israelite times it was widespread in the Far East , India , and Africa , and around the Mediterranean coasts .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 13
      • The “ leprosy ” in the walls of houses or garments took the form of red-green streaks or spots . This seems to have been a mildew or a fungus , and although different from the “ leprosy ” in human beings, probably indicated that the house was not a safe dwelling place . Affected clothing might also perhaps spread a fungus disease to human beings .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 14
      • Ellen G. White comments
      • 45 DA 262, 776 and 46-52MH 278
      • Leviticus chapter 14
      • 1 The rites and sacrifices in cleansing of the leper. 33 The signs of leprosy in a house. 43 The cleansing of that house.
      • 2. The law of the leper. The purification of a leper is given in more detail than that of the purification for any other defilement . As the leper was excluded not only from the sanctuary but from the camp , there were two ceremonies included in the restoration . The first entitled him to reenter the camp and associate with his brethren . The second , a week later , was performed in the court of the tabernacle and restored him to full fellowship and to all the privileges of the covenant relationship .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 14
      • The attitude toward leprosy , leading to exclusion from the camp , doubtless has its origin in the peculiar character of the disease . True leprosy was especially associated with death , in which it ordinarily eventuated , and in its later stages was a sort of “ living death ,” in which various members of the body died and sloughed off . Toward the last the leper was a specter of death , and illustrated in a graphic manner the wages of sin . For this reason leprosy has throughout the ages been considered , among both Jewish and Christian commentators , a symbol of sin and its results .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 14
      • One who had been placed outside the camp on suspicion of “ leprosy ” could call for a priest if he had the slightest indication that he was improving . It was the duty of the priest to go when he was called , but we may suppose that at times he did so with reluctance . Feeling sure that there had been no improvement , he would be tempted to become impatient and reluctant to respond . He needed patience , so as never to lose the feeling of compassion the leper so much needed . He must learn not to shun the leper , but to pity and help him . This is a lesson for the servants of God today . Like the priest of old , the minister of God today must “ have compassion ” (Heb. 5:2).
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • Leprosy Leviticus Chapter 14
      • Leprosy was not specifically painful , but the dread and horror of it must have vitally affected the whole life of the sufferer . In like manner sin may not be felt so keenly , and a man may hardly be conscious of its malignant nature . Leprosy was corrosive , and penetrated almost unfelt and unseen until it blossomed in ulcers and raw flesh , and wasted away parts of the body . So sin also eats out all spiritual life and beauty , even though outwardly there may be no striking evidence of the condition within . Finally, the disease broke forth externally , and the man became a living skeleton , a mass of loathsome corruption . So sin at last comes to fruition , until the image of God in man is practically obliterated . As leprosy ended in death , so sin ends in death . It would seem , therefore, that leprosy is a disease especially adapted to typify sin in its various features as no other malady could .
        • Nichol, Francis D., The Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association) 1978.
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-12
      • Although the job of prophet depended on a divine call, it would seem that this special time of serving together helped the would-be prophet develop his faith and trust in God. By serving his master Elijah, Elisha would be learning to put himself aside and serve others . This would prove to be the best qualification for any future ministry . We have no record of Gehazi’s calling , but we will see the opportunities that he was given .
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-12
      • This servant idea is by no means restricted to Old Testament times . Jesus said that the willingness to be a servant was a prerequisite for any leadership position in the church (Mark 9:35).
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-12
      • How do we get the humility and the death to self needed in order to serve others ? How do we learn to serve others with an attitude of seeking nothing back for ourselves ?
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-13
      • It sometimes is easy to be so self-centered and self-absorbed that we become insensitive to the feelings and needs of others . Who hasn’t been on both ends of that equation ? How can you learn to be more sensitive to the feelings and needs of others ? Also, how can you learn to bear gracefully the insensitivity of others toward you ?
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-14
      • Consider This: Which admirable qualities does Gehazi exhibit ? How does self-centeredness usher in insensitivity ?
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-15
      • GEHAZI’S FALL - It’s hard, at least from our perspective today , to understand why characters in the Bible did what they did at times , especially in the face of so many miraculous events . The incredible healing of Naaman happened right before Gehazi. He saw not only the power of God but the actions of his master , who refused to take any money from the captain . One would think that would have been more than enough to humble him before God and man , but apparently it didn’t .
    • SDA QUARTERLY DEC-15
      • It is strange that Gehazi swears to himself by the living God and then goes off to deceive . Does he think that the living God does not see him ? What a powerful testimony to the power of our own corrupt hearts to deceive us !
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • THE FOLLOWING ARE REFERENCES FROM THE SPIRIT OF PROPHECY WORTH MENTIONING
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.250.004
      • Gehazi, Elisha's servant, had had opportunity during the years to develop the spirit of self-denial characterizing his master's lifework . It had been his privilege to become a noble standard-bearer in the army of the Lord . The best gifts of Heaven had long been within his reach ; yet, turning from these , he had coveted instead the base alloy of worldly wealth . And now the hidden longings of his avaricious spirit led him to yield to an overmastering temptation . "Behold," he reasoned within himself, "my master hath spared Naaman this Syrian, in not receiving at his hands that which he brought: but . . . I will run after him, and take somewhat of him." And thus it came about that in secrecy "Gehazi followed after Naaman."
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.251.001
      • When Naaman saw him running after him , he lighted down from the chariot to meet him , and said, Is all well? And he said, All is well." Then Gehazi uttered a deliberate lie . "My master," he said, "hath sent me, saying, Behold, even now there be come to me from Mount Ephraim two young men of the sons of the prophets: give them, I pray thee, a talent of silver, and two changes of garments." To the request Naaman gladly acceded , pressing upon Gehazi two talents of silver instead of one , "with two changes of garments," and commissioning servants to bear the treasure back .
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.251.003
      • Then came the stern denunciation , showing that Elisha knew all . "Went not mine heart with thee," he asked, "when the man turned again from his chariot to meet thee? Is it a time to receive money, and to receive garments, and olive yards, and vineyards, and sheep, and oxen, and menservants, and maidservants? The leprosy therefore of Naaman shall cleave unto thee, and unto thy seed forever." Swift was the retribution that overtook the guilty man . He went out from Elisha's presence "a leper as white as snow."
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.252.001
      • Solemn are the lessons taught by this experience of one to whom had been given high and holy privileges . The course of Gehazi was such as to place a stumbling block in the pathway of Naaman , upon whose mind had broken a wonderful light , and who was favorably disposed toward the service of the living God . For the deception practiced by Gehazi there could be pleaded no excuse . To the day of his death he remained a leper , cursed of God and shunned by his fellow men .
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.252.002
      • "A false witness shall not be unpunished , and he that speaketh lies shall not escape ." Proverbs 19:5. Men may think to hide their evil deeds from human eyes , but they cannot deceive God . " All things are naked and opened unto the eyes of Him with whom we have to do ." Heb. 4:13. Gehazi thought to deceive Elisha , but God revealed to His prophet the words that Gehazi had spoken to Naaman , and every detail of the scene between the two men .
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.252.003
      • Truth is of God ; deception in all its myriad forms is of Satan, and whoever in any way departs from the straight line of truth is betraying himself into the power of the wicked one . Those who have learned of Christ will " have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness ." Ephesians 5:11. In speech , as in life , they will be simple , straightforward , and true , for they are preparing for the fellowship of those holy ones in whose mouth is found no guile . See Revelation 14:5.
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.252.004
      • Centuries after Naaman returned to his Syrian home , healed in body and converted in spirit , his wonderful faith was referred to and commended by the Saviour as an object lesson for all who claim to serve God . " Many lepers were in Israel in the time of Eliseus the prophet ," the Saviour declared; "and none of them was cleansed , saving Naaman the Syrian ." Luke 4:27. God passed over the many lepers in Israel because their unbelief closed the door of good to them . A heathen nobleman who had been true to his convictions of right , and who felt his need of help , was in the sight of God more worthy of His blessing than were the afflicted in Israel , who had slighted and despised their God-given privileges . God works for those who appreciate His favors and respond to the light given them from heaven .
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.253.001
      • Today in every land there are those who are honest in heart , and upon these the light of heaven is shining . If they continue faithful in following that which they understand to be duty , they will be given increased light , until , like Naaman of old , they will be constrained to acknowledge that " there is no God in all the earth ," save the living God , the Creator .
    • SPIRIT OF PROPHECY
      • PK.253.002
      • To every sincere soul "that walketh in darkness, and hath no light," is given the invitation , " Let him trust in the name of the Lord , and stay upon his God ." " For since the beginning of the world men have not heard , nor perceived by the ear , neither hath the eye seen , O God , beside Thee , what He hath prepared for him that waiteth for Him . Thou meetest him that rejoiceth and worketh righteousness , those that remember Thee in Thy ways ." Isaiah 50:10; 64:4, 5.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Thomas Ken wrote this hymn at a time when the es­tab­lished church be­lieved on­ly Script­ure should be sung as hymns—with an em­pha­sis on the Psalms. Some con­sid­ered it sin­ful and blas­phe­mous to write new lyr­ics for church mu­sic, akin to ad­ding to the Script­ures. In that at­mo­sphere, Ken wrote this and sev­er­al other hymns for the boys at Win­chest­er Col­lege, with strict in­struct­ions that they use them on­ly in their rooms, for pri­vate de­vo­tions. Iron­ic­al­ly, the last stan­za has come into wide­spread use as the Dox­ol­o­gy , per­haps the most fr­equent­ly used piece of mu­sic in pub­lic wor­ship. At Ken’s request, the hymn was sung at his fun­er­al, fit­tingly held at sun­rise.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Awake, my soul, and with the sun Thy daily stage of duty run; Shake off dull sloth, and joyful rise, To pay thy morning sacrifice.
      • Thy precious time misspent, redeem, Each present day thy last esteem, Improve thy talent with due care; For the great day thyself prepare.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • By influence of the Light divine Let thy own light to others shine. Reflect all Heaven’s propitious ways In ardent love, and cheerful praise.
      • In conversation be sincere; Keep conscience as the noontide clear; Think how all seeing God thy ways And all thy secret thoughts surveys.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Wake, and lift up thyself, my heart, And with the angels bear thy part, Who all night long unwearied sing High praise to the eternal King.
      • All praise to Thee, who safe has kept And hast refreshed me while I slept Grant, Lord, when I from death shall wake I may of endless light partake.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Heav’n is, dear Lord, where’er Thou art, O never then from me depart; For to my soul ’tis hell to be But for one moment void of Thee.
      • Lord, I my vows to Thee renew; Disperse my sins as morning dew. Guard my first springs of thought and will, And with Thyself my spirit fill.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Direct, control, suggest, this day, All I design, or do, or say, That all my powers, with all their might, In Thy sole glory may unite.
      • I would not wake nor rise again And Heaven itself I would disdain, Wert Thou not there to be enjoyed, And I in hymns to be employed.
    • AWAKE, MY SOUL, AND WITH THE SUN
      • Praise God, from Whom all blessings flow; Praise Him, all creatures here below; Praise Him above, ye heavenly host; Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.
      • THANK THE LORD JESUS CHRIST