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Internationalisation, student voices and the shock doctrine: disrupting business-as-usual
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Internationalisation, student voices and the shock doctrine: disrupting business-as-usual

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my second presentation for the 11th Teesside University Learning and Teaching Conference, 26 January 2011. blogged at: http://bit.ly/hl6IhO

my second presentation for the 11th Teesside University Learning and Teaching Conference, 26 January 2011. blogged at: http://bit.ly/hl6IhO

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  • Source: Tim Jackson, Rebound launch: keynote presentation (http://www.ukerc.ac.uk/Downloads/PDF/07/0710ReboundEffect/0710TJKeynote.pdf) “ Technology is an efficiency factor in the equation. Population and affluence are scaling factors. Even as the efficiency of technology improves, affluence and population scale up the impacts. And the overall result depends on improving technological efficiency fast enough to outrun the scale effects of affluence and population.” So these factors are not independent and “appear to be in a self-reinforcing positive feedback between affluence and technology, potentially – and I emphasise potentially – geared in the direction of rising impact” For a quick overview of I=PAT, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_PAT