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Fire Life Safety- Point of Ignition 2011- By Richard Garrity
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Fire Life Safety- Point of Ignition 2011- By Richard Garrity

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Fire Life Safety- Point of Ignition 2011- By Richard Garrity Fire Life Safety- Point of Ignition 2011- By Richard Garrity Presentation Transcript

  • 1 Fire Life Safety- Point of Ignition Presentation by: Richard Garrity
  • 2 This presentation is proprietary information and can’t be copied or reproduced in any fashion without consent from the publisher owner.
  • 3 Flashpoint is: The point of no return
  • 4 ~It is how you respond and react that makes all the difference between life and death~
  • 5 This presentation will focus primarily on 10 areas of concern: • Actual incidents of building Fires and the causes • The dynamics of how a Fire ignites • Fire Prevention-  Extinguishers and Classes  Sprinkler heads / equipment  Aggressive detection  Preparedness/ Readiness  911 notification  Hot Work Safety Training  First Aid Locations/ Contents
  • 6 Introduction to Point of Ignition • Fire Life Safety is one of the many and various safety concerns of building owners-managers, building employees, and the security personnel assigned to protect said facility. It is also the most important concern. An actual fast moving Fire in any section of a building can be devastating and cause a tremendous loss of human life in a matter of seconds.
  • 7 Introduction to Point of Ignition • Buildings are designed and constructed to confine and control a fire to allow building occupants time to evacuate. Buildings are also designed to allow fire department personnel time to access and gain control over the fire. Buildings are designed for the expected fire loads they will encounter during their lifespan. Bombs, terrorist acts or some arsons may exceed these expectations and subject the building to fire loads for which they were not designed.
  • 8 Introduction to Point of Ignition • Equipment and emergency procedures dealing with egress and exit facilities, fire alarm systems, voice communication systems, fire suppression systems (sprinklers) and other life safety devices and features will play a major role in enhancing occupant safety in the event of a fire and/or explosion. Property owners and managers must ensure that these life safety features are maintained in operable condition and ready for use at all times. Security personnel must monitor these as well.
  • 9 An approved Fire Safety Plan typically contains:  The emergency procedures to be used in case of fire including sounding the fire alarm, notifying the fire department, provisions for access for fire fighting, instructing occupants on procedures to be followed when the fire alarm sounds, evacuating endangered occupants and confining, controlling and extinguishing the fire,  The appointment and organization of designated supervisory staff to carry out fire safety duties ( Floor or Fire Wardens especially with location of the handicapped).  The instruction of supervisory staff and other occupants so that they are aware of their responsibilities for fire safety,
  • 10 An approved Fire Safety Plan typically contains: The holding of annual fire drills including the emergency procedures appropriate to the building The control of fire hazards in the building  The maintenance of building facilities provided for the safety of occupants The provision of alternative measures for the safety of occupants during any shutdown of fire protection equipment and systems or part thereof
  • 11 Examples of past tragedies:
  • 12 The “Station” nightclub fire: • On 20 February 2003, a terrible tragedy occurred at the Station Nightclub in West Warwick, Rhode Island. Unapproved pyrotechnics were used as part of a show that the band Great White was putting on. The pyrotechnics were set off early into the show and ignited sound proofing polyurethane foam that was located on the ceiling and the walls proximal to the platform that the band was performing on. Within minutes of the ignition of the foam the building was consumed with fire and smoke. Egress was slowed by the majority of the occupants attempting to escape through the main entrance. One hundred people were killed in this fire.
  • 13 The “Station” nightclub fire: Band manager Daniel Biechele in the forefront just after igniting the pyrotechnics that engulfed the nightclub:
  • 14 The “Station” nightclub fire: The next media slide must be in full window format and on- line to be properly viewed.
  • 15 :
  • 16 The “Station” floor plan layout:
  • 17 The Boston Cocoanut Grove Fire: • The Cocoanut Grove was a nightclub in Boston, Massachusetts which, on November 28, 1942, burned in what remains the deadliest nightclub fire in American history, killing 492 people and injuring hundreds more. It was also the second-worst single- building fire in American history; only the Iroquois Theater Fire in Chicago in 1903 killed more (602). The tragedy shocked the nation and briefly replaced World War II news headlines. The fire led to a reform of fire codes and safety standards across the country
  • 18 The Boston Cocoanut Grove Fire:
  • 19 The L.A. First Interstate Bank Fire: • The First Interstate Tower fire was a high rise fire that occurred on May 4, 1988 at the First Interstate Tower in Los Angeles, California (62 stories). The fire destroyed five floors of the building, injured 40 people, and caused the death of a maintenance worker, when the elevator the worker was riding opened onto the burning 12th floor. The fire was so severe because the building was not equipped with a sprinkler system, which was not required for office towers at the time construction was completed in 1973. A sprinkler system was 90% installed at the time of the fire but inoperative. The fire was believed to have started from faulty electrical wiring on the 12th floor. Loss: $200 million.
  • 20 Timeline of “Fire” and “Ignorance” Two fire pumps were shut down by sprinkler contractor (drain down) 3 smoke detectors on the 12th floor were activated and again reset by security control An alarm on the 5th floor was pulled and soon went dead A smoke detector on the 12th floor was activated and ignored by Security 4 smoke detectors on the 12th floor were activated and reset 22:22 22:25 22:30 22:32 22:34 22:36 First report of the fire from inside the building made to LA Brigade22:41 Los Angeles Fire brigade started to fight the fire finally23:10 Multiple smoke detector alarms from the 12th - 30th floors activated
  • 21 The First Interstate Bank- May 1988:
  • 22 The First Interstate Bank today:
  • 23 Tragedy “Averted”- Case in point:
  • 24 Wellesley Office Park Incident: In February 2004, at the Wellesley Office Park-MA, a dental office was filled with smoke and fire. Upon entering one room, it was discovered that an employee left a “Bunsen burner” still lit and stored inside a cabinet. The device burned a whole right thru the counter top but was extinguished swiftly by quick responding Fire-Fighters. There was minimal damage to the room, but heavy smoke damage on the entire floor.
  • 25 Fire: Preparedness and Prevention
  • 26 What can I the Security Officer do when faced with a working Fire?
  • 27 “Never try to be the Hero” This is a placeholder text. This text can be replaced with your own text. If you should detect smoke or fire while on patrol or responding to an alert of said incident, the first thing you do is report the situation to base control with the exact location of the smoke or fire.  The next thing you do is direct all occupants to evacuate the floor as soon as possible and pull the Fire alarm if necessary. If, and I stress “IF” the fire is small and manageable, then utilize a nearby fire extinguisher and attempt to put out the flames, using extreme caution.  If it is deemed that the Fire or density of smoke is too much, make sure that the floor above and the floor below are evacuated ASAP. Further instructions for evacuation will be issued by the Fire Battalion Chief. If you should detect smoke or fire while on patrol or responding to an alert of said incident, the first thing you do is report the situation to base control with the exact location of the smoke or fire.  The next thing you do is direct all occupants to evacuate the floor as soon as possible and pull the Fire alarm if necessary. If, and I stress “IF” the fire is small and manageable, then utilize a nearby fire extinguisher and attempt to put out the flames, using extreme caution.  If it is deemed that the Fire or density of smoke is too much, make sure that the floor above and the floor below are evacuated ASAP. Further instructions for evacuation will be issued by the Fire Battalion Chief. The Rule of “First” Detection:The Rule of “First” Detection: “DETECT” “REACT”
  • 28 1 Faulty electrical wiring Transformer overload/ explosion Heating and cooking equipment Open flames and flammable liquids What are the primary causes of a building Fire? 2 3 4
  • 29  Never ignore a Trouble alarm  Never dismiss any alert as a “nuisance” alarm  NEVER, NEVER “RESET” a Fire alarm on the control panel. It is “illegal” to do so on the part of any security personnel  Never overlook safety gauges that maybe in the danger or “red” zone  Never fail to notify appropriate personnel of any “Trouble” alarms  Never ignore a Trouble alarm  Never dismiss any alert as a “nuisance” alarm  NEVER, NEVER “RESET” a Fire alarm on the control panel. It is “illegal” to do so on the part of any security personnel  Never overlook safety gauges that maybe in the danger or “red” zone  Never fail to notify appropriate personnel of any “Trouble” alarms  Always monitor fire panel  Always investigate “Trouble” alerts  Always “acknowledge” all alarms  Always investigate any reports of smoke or unusual odors  Always follow up with direct call to 911 regardless of weather the alarm rings directly to the Fire Dept.  Always report Fire hazards ASAP  Always “Turn Off” any cooking/ coffee appliances found ON during your safety patrols  Always monitor fire panel  Always investigate “Trouble” alerts  Always “acknowledge” all alarms  Always investigate any reports of smoke or unusual odors  Always follow up with direct call to 911 regardless of weather the alarm rings directly to the Fire Dept.  Always report Fire hazards ASAP  Always “Turn Off” any cooking/ coffee appliances found ON during your safety patrols Security Personnel Expectations: NegativeNegativePositivePositive Monitoring the Fire Control panel: Negative:Negative:Positive:Positive:
  • 30 PULL AIM Squeeze Sweep When attempting to extinguish a small, “manageable” Fire, always follow the steps of “PASS”. Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep PASS:
  • 31 “P.A.S.S.” Operation of a standard fire extinguisher: • Pull the locking pin. • Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire • Squeeze the trigger all the way closed • Sweep the extinguisher discharge from side to side over the area of the fire until thoroughly extinguished.
  • 32 “R.A.C.E”
  • 33 “R.A.C.E.” R- Remove people from the immediate danger area to a place of safety if possible. A- Alert nearby tenants & members of the public C- Confine fire and smoke. Close windows and doors (if safe). E- Evacuate to assembly/ rally point area (do not re-enter building under any circumstances).
  • 34 The “Fire Triangle”:
  • 35 Potential hazards to take notice of while on patrol of the facility: Fire / Emergency Patrol Tips Fire / Emergency Patrol Tips FIRE = OXYGEN + FUEL + HEAT FIRE = OXYGEN + FUEL + HEAT SMOKE ENTRAPMENT= STOP + DROP + ROLL SMOKE ENTRAPMENT= STOP + DROP + ROLL  Heat producing equipment, copiers, word processors, coffee makers and hot plates are often overlooked as a potential fire hazard. Keep them away from anything that might burn.  Heat producing equipment, copiers, word processors, coffee makers and hot plates are often overlooked as a potential fire hazard. Keep them away from anything that might burn. If electrical equipment malfunctions or gives off a strange odor, disconnect it and call the Engineer on Duty. The Electrician will promptly disconnect and replace frayed, cracked or broken electrical cords. If electrical equipment malfunctions or gives off a strange odor, disconnect it and call the Engineer on Duty. The Electrician will promptly disconnect and replace frayed, cracked or broken electrical cords. Extension cords should be clear of doorways and other areas where they can be stepped on or chafed and never plug one extension cord into another. Extension cords should be clear of doorways and other areas where they can be stepped on or chafed and never plug one extension cord into another.
  • 36 Potential hazards to take notice of while on patrol of the facility: Fire / Emergency Patrol Tips Fire / Emergency Patrol Tips FIRE = OXYGEN + FUEL + HEAT FIRE = OXYGEN + FUEL + HEAT SMOKE ENTRAPMENT= STOP + DROP + ROLL SMOKE ENTRAPMENT= STOP + DROP + ROLL  Do not allow combustible material (boxes, paper, etc.) to build up in inappropriate storage locations (near sources of ignition).  Do not allow combustible material (boxes, paper, etc.) to build up in inappropriate storage locations (near sources of ignition).  Ungrounded site equipment, overloaded outlets, unsafe-unapproved equipment, blocked electrical panels and transformers.  Ungrounded site equipment, overloaded outlets, unsafe-unapproved equipment, blocked electrical panels and transformers.  Fire equipment, extinguishers, fire door exits and sprinkler heads must remain obstructed. Materials should be at least 36 inches minimum away from sprinkler heads.  Fire equipment, extinguishers, fire door exits and sprinkler heads must remain obstructed. Materials should be at least 36 inches minimum away from sprinkler heads.
  • 37 Fire Extinguisher Classes:
  • 38 Fire Extinguisher Classes: • Fire extinguishers are divided into four categories, based on different types of fires. Each fire extinguisher also has a numerical rating that serves as a guide for the amount of fire the extinguisher can handle. The higher the number, the more fire- fighting power. The following is a quick guide to help choose the right type of fire extinguisher in an emergency.
  • 39 Fire Extinguisher Classes: • Class A extinguishers are for ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, cardboard, and most plastics. The numerical rating on these types of extinguishers indicates the amount of water it holds and the amount of fire it can extinguish. • Class B fires involve flammable or combustible liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, grease and oil. The numerical rating for class B extinguishers indicates the approximate number of square feet of fire it can extinguish.
  • 40 Fire Extinguisher Classes: •Class C fires involve electrical equipment, such as appliances, wiring, circuit breakers and outlets. Never use water to extinguish class C fires - the risk of electrical shock is far too great! Class C extinguishers do not have a numerical rating. The C classification means the extinguishing agent is non-conductive. •Class D fire extinguishers are commonly found in a chemical laboratory. They are for fires that involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, potassium and sodium. These types of extinguishers also have no numerical rating, nor are they given a multi-purpose rating - they are designed for class D fires only.
  • 41 Here are the most common types of fire extinguishers: • Water extinguishers or APW extinguishers (air-pressurized water) are suitable for class A fires only. Never use water extinguishers on grease fires, electrical fires or class D fires - the flames will spread and make the fire bigger! Water extinguishers are filled with water and are typically pressurized with air. Again - water extinguishers can be very dangerous in the wrong type of situation. Only fight the fire if you're certain it contains ordinary combustible materials only. • Dry chemical extinguishers come in a variety of types and are suitable for a combination of class A, B and C fires. These are filled with foam or powder and pressurized with nitrogen.
  • 42 Types of fire extinguishers: • Carbon Dioxide (CO2) extinguishers are used for class B and C fires. CO2 extinguishers contain carbon dioxide, a non-flammable gas, and are highly pressurized. The pressure is so great that it is not uncommon for bits of dry ice to shoot out the nozzle. They don't work very well on class A fires because they may not be able to displace enough oxygen to put the fire out, causing it to re-ignite. • (Note: CO2 extinguishers have an advantage over dry chemical extinguishers since they don't leave a harmful residue - a good choice for an electrical fire on a computer or other favorite electronic device such as a stereo or TV.)
  • 43 Reporting Emergencies: Alarm Activation & 911
  • 44 Reporting Emergencies: The spread of fire can be very fast. It takes less than two minutes for a free-burning fire to reach temperatures over 1,000 degrees F. Controlling the fire and evacuating everyone safely depends upon immediate notification of the emergency to the Fire Department, Building Security, or Management personnel. Post all telephones with the Fire Department’s emergency number
  • 45 Reporting Emergencies: Building occupants should be instructed to call 9-1-1 whenever an emergency occurs.  They should be able to provide the following information: • The nature of the emergency • The address of the building • The nearest cross street
  • 46 Reporting Emergencies: • The extent of the fire or emergency and any specific information relating to the incident, if known Follow the 9-1-1 operator’s instructions (Never hang up until told to do so by the 911 operator)
  • 47 AUTOMATIC FIRE ALARM REPORTING: A common misconception is that the Fire Department always monitors building fire alarms. This is not true. Some are monitored “in house”, and some building fire alarms are monitored by private monitoring companies. When such a company receives a signal indicating an alarm has activated, they in turn notify the appropriate Fire Department Dispatch Center.
  • 48 AUTOMATIC FIRE ALARM REPORTING: NEVER MAKE THE ASSUMPTION THAT A FIRE ALARM WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE REPORTED TO THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. Always make sure that a call has been placed directly to 9-1-1 regardless of whether your building is monitored by a private monitoring service.
  • 49 Know the equipment and Personnel!
  • 50 Building occupants should know who are the Safety/Fire Wardens on their floors~
  • 51 Building occupants must know where their proper “Rally” points are.
  • 52 Once people have evacuated the building, no one is allowed back in to retrieve any belongings- coats, purses, IPODS, until the “All Clear” has been broadcast.
  • 53 Security Personnel must ensure that office workers are not blocking or congregating at the building entrances during an evacuation.
  • Evacuation to the ”Rally Point” REMAIN Report Location Wait for ALL CLEAR DO NOT RUN Closest Stairwell
  • 55 Know and inspect your Fire strobes:
  • 56 Be familiar with Sprinkler heads:
  • 57 Boston Fire Ladder 26- Mission Hill
  • 58 Sprinkler head locations and shutoffs • In January of 2009 in the Mission Hill section of Boston, Massachusetts, Ladder 26 of the Boston Fire Dept. was descending down one of the steepest hills in the region. The mammoth truck suddenly lost braking power and plowed down the hill thru a busy intersection and slammed into a residential high rise building. The cab of the vehicle was inside the building and filling up with water from a broken sprinkler head threatening to drown a trapped Firefighter. The driver was dead on impact. A quick thinking Engineer from CLSB Boston was there at impact and was able to quickly find the shutoff valve as workers there didn’t know how to shut it down. That action saved the life of the F/F.
  • 59 Know your location of MSDS:
  • 60 What are MSDS sheets? • Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) are designed to provide both workers and emergency personnel with the proper procedures for handling or working with a particular substance, and identifying them. MSDS sheets include information such as physical data (melting point, boiling point, flash point etc.), toxicity, health effects, first aid, reactivity, storage, disposal, protective equipment, and spill/leak procedures. These are of particular use if a spill or other accident occurs in your building.
  • 61 MSDS sheets- Demand & Inspection:
  • 62 MSDS sheets- Demand & Inspection: • Are your MSDS up to date? What person, group, or entity will most likely need to review MSDS sheets? In almost every instance, arriving Fire personnel, outside contractors, and or OSHA safety inspectors. Firefighter personnel must be completely aware of exactly what type of chemicals are on site and where they are used & stored. When faced with a real working Fire or explosion, Firefighters MUST be knowledgeable of where hazardous chemicals are located. If not, they could be severely hurt or killed.
  • 63 Insure that the staff responsible for maintaining MSDS sheets updates them as they occur and with regard to each floor, section, storage area, and designation of chemical & toxicity.
  • 64
  • 65 Know where your building Fire Pump is:
  • 66 CRITICAL! Know exactly where all your exterior Fire Dept. standpipes, pump test, and sprinkler connections are. A must.
  • 67 Know where your building Emergency Backup Generator is:
  • 68
  • 69 All electrical panels must have clearance of at least 3 feet from the unit. Report violations!
  • 70 Inspect all electrical panels and building energy sources that have these locking mechanisms. Specifically inspect for tampering or unsecured
  • 71 Know where your Fire Pull stations are:
  • 72 AED’s and proper signage should be noted and batteries checked monthly and documented.
  • 73 Faithfully checking the batteries in your site AED could mean the difference of life and death for someone who is in distress.
  • 74 Make monthly inspections of Fire Bull Horn and make sure batteries are fresh and operable.
  • 75 Safety vests and flashlights for all shift personnel should be available at all times.
  • 76 Know your Fire Alarm Control Panel:
  • 77 Fire Alarm Control Panel: You need to know exactly what buttons you “push” and what buttons you don’t “push”
  • 78 Fire Alarm Control Panel: Never guess what to “push”. KNOW
  • 79 The Fire Alarm Control Panel- “RESET”: The facility Fire Alarm Control panel is without question the most vital and life saving piece of equipment when it comes to Fire Life Safety. It is the guardian of building safety. With that, it is imperative to note that when responding to an active Fire alarm panel activation (NOT a Trouble alert), you NEVER hit “RESET”. You only hit “ACKNOWLEDGE”. In many municipalities around the country, personnel hitting RESET can actually be criminally charged for such action. ONLY the Fire Department can RESET a Fire Alarm panel.
  • 80 Ensure that Emergency lighting is checked periodically and operable:
  • 81 Know the location and inspect all Emergency Exit signage:
  • 82 Know how to operate the standard parking garage Pyrene “Water Cannon”
  • 83 Be Alert! Keep your “Fire Lanes” clear.
  • 84 Know the location of ALL Emergency Phones and or Emergency Call Buttons:
  • 85 Know the location of ALL First Aid kits and bags. Inspect contents monthly. Report items that maybe depleted or empty.
  • 86 The First Aid Kit- First Aid kits are basic medical supplies for first responders to be treated on people who have minor cuts, minimal injuries, rashes, headaches, slight fever, sprains to joints, or very minor burns to the skin. First aid kits are especially critical to any individual who have had any type of chemical or burn exposure to the eyes. First Aid kits are generally affixed to one location, like a wall and are very visible for quick access & use.
  • 87 The First Responder Medical Bag:
  • 88 The First Aid Mobile Kit/Bag- First Aid mobile kits are medical supplies and instruments usually contained in a blue nylon bag with the white medical symbol on the bag sleeve. They are basically advanced first aid kits that can be transported anywhere within the facility and these emergency bags hold more supplies than the average standard first aid kit. They are very expensive and must be secured in an area where only authorized building personnel have access.
  • 89 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 1. EPI-PEN 2. Antihistamine Pills- For the treatment of minor allergies, bug bites, etc. 3. BAND AIDS- Used to treat cuts, scrapes, and minor punctures in the skin. 4. ACE Bandage- Handy to have for minor joint sprains. 5. Gauze Pads 6. Roll of Gauze
  • 90 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 7. Adhesive Gauze Tape- Gauze and adhesive tape are necessary for treating deeper skins wounds. 8. Butterfly Closures- Used to close deep cuts in the skin. 9. Small Pair of Scissors 10. Pair of Tweezers- Effective for removing splinters, slivers, etc. 11. Antiseptic Ointment such as NEOSPORIN
  • 91 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 12. Pain Relievers and Fever Reducers such as TYLENOL, MOTRIN, or Aspirin 13. Rubbing Alcohol- Used for alleviating bruises and sterilization. 14. Burn Ointment- To relieve pain and hasten the healing process. 15. Sterile Cotton Balls- Used for cleaning wounds and applying treatments. 16. Disposable Latex Gloves
  • 92 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 17. Hydrogen Peroxide- Disinfectant, Mouth Wash, etc. 18. Instant-activating Cold Packs- Great for reducing swelling and fever. 19. PEPTO BISMOL- A timeless remedy for nausea, bloating, diarrhea, and other digestive tract disorders. 20. Calamine Lotion- Used for minor skin rashes.
  • 93 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 21. Syrup of Ipecac- This syrup is used in case of accidental poisonings. DO NOT USE SYRUP OF IPECAC UNLESS YOU ARE DIRECTED TO DO SO BY A POISON CONTROL CENTER OR BY A HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL. 22. Sewing Needle- Used to remove splinters, slivers, etc. 23. Small Flashlight- If space allows such
  • 94 What exactly should the contents of a First Aid Response Kit contain? 24. Eye Wash Solution- Used for removing foreign objects or chemicals. 25. Complete List of Emergency Telephone Numbers- This list will include the names and phone numbers of your healthcare professionals, the regional poison control center, and the like. 26. First Aid Manual
  • 95 What is an EPI-PEN??
  • 96 What is an EPI-PEN? An EPI-PEN is a measured dose of Epinephrine. Epinephrine is the official emergency treatment for allergic reactions to things such as bee stings. The EPI-PEN is an injector that administers a premeasured dose. A severe allergic reaction, which is known in the medical world as "Anaphylaxis", can be fatal if it's not treated in a matter of minutes. EPI-PENS are a must have and you must be trained to administer an EPI-PEN.
  • 97
  • 98 The HOT WORK PERMIT:
  • 99 The HOT WORK PERMIT: Hot work operations include tasks such as welding, brazing, torch cutting, grinding, and torch soldering. These operations create heat, sparks and hot slag that have the potential to ignite flammable and combustible materials in the area surrounding hot work activities. The United States averages 12,630 hot work fires, $308.9 million in property damages and 31 deaths per year. A single hot work fire can be devastating.
  • 100 The HOT WORK PERMIT: A Permit Authorizing Individual (PAI) inspects hot work sites prior to the start of hot work operations using the checklist found on the Hot Work Permit Form. When a fire watch is required, the PAI will designate an employee to serve as Fire Watch. Once all requirements on the form have been satisfied and the form is signed by a PAI, the document becomes a Hot Work Permit and must be posted in the area where hot work is done.
  • 101 The HOT WORK PERMIT:
  • 102 The HOT WORK PERMIT:
  • 103 The HOT WORK PERMIT:
  • 104 The HOT WORK PERMIT:
  • 105 The HOT WORK PERMIT- The 35 Foot Rule All flammable and combustible materials within a 35-foot radius of hot work must be removed. • When flammable and combustible materials within a 35-foot radius of hot work cannot be removed they must be covered with flame retardant tarps and a fire watch must be posted. • Floors and surfaces within a 35-foot radius of the hot work area must be swept free of combustible dust or debris. This is part of the pre-inspection.
  • 106 The HOT WORK PERMIT: All openings or cracks in the walls, floors, or ducts that are potential travel passages for sparks, heat and flames must be covered. A fire extinguisher must be readily available and readily accessible. Fire Watches are posted by a PAI if the situation requires one, during hot work, and for at least 30-60 minutes after work has been completed.
  • 107 The First and Last Rule of Fire Life Safety- If an Alarm is sounding- don’t assume they heard it. Always dial 911
  • 108 DON’T 1 2 3 4 PLAY WITH MATCHES! Safety Message:
  • 109 ~Thank you for attending today’s presentation on Fire Life Safety~
  • 110 Click to add text •Add text 1 •Add text 2 •Add text 3 D C B A D C A B Add text title Add text title Add text title Add text title Your Text Here
  • 111 Concept Concept Concept Concept 1 2 3 4 Add text title Add text title Add text title Add text title Click to add text •Add text 1 •Add text 2 •Add text 3 Your Text Here