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Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes
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Metadata lecture 3, metadata schemes

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  • Starting point is really the “particular purpose”. After reading slide: Do you know of any metadata schemes?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Richard Sapon-White March 11, 2013
    • 2. Scheme:A set of metadata elements and the rules for their use that have been defined for a particular purpose 2
    • 3.  Dublin Core Metadata  Government Element Set (DC) Information Locator Visual Resources Service Profile Association Core  GEM (Gateway to Categories (VRA) Educational Encoded Archival Materials) Description (EAD)  ONIX Data Documentation  Content Standard for Initiative Digital Geospatial Metadata (CSDGM) 3
    • 4.  Semantics – meanings of metadata elements Content rules – selection and representation of metadata element content Syntax – encoding of elements 4
    • 5.  AACR2 specifies element names and definitions (e.g., author, other title information, publisher) [semantics] AACR2 also specifies content rules (e.g., selection and representation of author names) ISBD and MARC specify syntax ◦ 245 $a Title : $b other title information / $c author. 5
    • 6.  Some schemes can accommodate multiple content standards Examples: DC + DACS + LCSH DC + AACR2 + LCSH MARC + AACR2 + MeSH
    • 7.  Documenting the creation, version, and reuse of information resources Organization and description Validation – documenting the authoritativeness or trustworthiness of the information resource Search and retrieval Utilization and preservation Accessioning and deaccessioning
    • 8.  Is metadata always digital? ◦ No. Metadata can also exists in paper form. Is metadata always descriptive? ◦ No. Metadata can also record the creation, management, preservation, and history of an information resource. True or False: Metadata for a given information resource can come from many sources. ◦ True.
    • 9.  True or False: Metadata accrues during the life of a digital object. ◦ True. True or False: Metadata is not data and data is not metadata. ◦ False. “The distinctions between what constitutes data and what constitutes metadata can often be very fluid.”
    • 10.  Increased accessibility Retention of context Expanding use Learning metadata System development and enhancement Multiversioning Legal issues Preservation and persistence
    • 11.  High quality descriptive metadata… ◦ Enhances retrieval ◦ Enables searching across multiple collections ◦ Enables creation of virtual collections Especially possible when common elements are present in different metadata schemes Example: OSU’s conversion of EAD/DACS-based finding aids to MARC bibliographic records (M. Elwood Smith papers) http://oasis.oregonstate.edu/
    • 12.  Metadata can document the relationships that an information resource has with people, places, and things, including other information resources Example: Archival finding aids can indicate other related collections as well as the structure of within a collection, providing context for users
    • 13.  Provides access to the entire universe of users, wherever they are Enables the manipulation of the information resource for users with special needs, different language skills, etc.
    • 14.  Specialized forms of metadata can be used to promote learning by students of all ages. Example: http:// www.thegateway.org/browse/20651
    • 15.  Metadata can document changing uses of systems and content In turn, can use this feedback to make systems development decisions Examples: search log data, download counts, etc.
    • 16.  A digital object may exist in several forms within a resource, such a images in thumbnail and full-size Metadata enables users and machines to distinguish between the multiple versions of a resource
    • 17.  Metadata documents: ◦ Licensing ◦ Legal rights ◦ Reproductions ◦ Restrictions on access or use ◦ Privacy concerns
    • 18.  Technical, descriptive, and preservation metadata ◦ Document how an information resource was:  created,  maintained,  how it relates to other information objects

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