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Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0
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Whitepaper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0

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  • 1. White Paper Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Published: April 2009
  • 2. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Contents Enterprise 2.0: Culture and Technology in Tandem ................................................1  Cultivating Enterprise 2.0 Culture .............................................................................3  Leadership..............................................................................................................4  Championing Corporate Communications – Blogs..........................................5  Balancing Freedom and Control.............................................................................6  Making Enterprise 2.0 Safe..............................................................................9  Knowledge as Currency .......................................................................................10  Realising the Virtual Enterprise ............................................................................10  Business Drivers of Enterprise 2.0 .........................................................................12  Optimise Customer Service..................................................................................12  Enable Channels and Partnership Networks .......................................................12  Spot Opportunities in Unexpected Places ............................................................13  Cultivate Brand Engagement and Loyalty ............................................................13  Use Customer and Partner Communities.............................................................13  Manage Human Capital........................................................................................14  Provide Self-Service and Peer-to-Peer Empowerment........................................14  Protect and Value Corporate Memory ..................................................................14  Achieve Transparency and Corporate Governance .............................................15  Support the Virtual Enterprise ..............................................................................15  Empower the Frontline .........................................................................................15  Open Text and Enterprise 2.0 ..................................................................................16  Open Text and Social Computing............................................................................17  Targeted Content Delivery....................................................................................17  Success Stories from The Content Experts™ .......................................................18  Northrop Grumman Accelerates Employee Productivity ......................................18  STA Travel Reaches Out to New Markets ............................................................18  CARE Canada Empowers Women ......................................................................18  Conclusion.................................................................................................................19  Definitions..................................................................................................................20  Social Marketplace ...............................................................................................20  Social Workplace..................................................................................................20  Social Compliance................................................................................................20  About Open Text .......................................................................................................21  Connect People, Process and Content ................................................................21  The Content Experts: Learn from Shared Experience .........................................21  www.opentext.com i
  • 3. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Enterprise 2.0: Culture and Technology in Tandem Web 2.0 is becoming increasingly prevalent in the enterprise, especially as organisations hire a new generation of employees who use these technologies in their personal lives and expect to use them at work. The 2.0 phenomenon is entering the workplace as Enterprise 2.0, creating not only a technical shift but a cultural shift. To be relevant in today’s market, it is imperative that organisations adapt their business strategies and foster this generational investment. Whereas Web 1.0 introduced an array of technologies such as Enterprise Content Management (ECM), search engines and directories, Web 2.0 exploits these foundational, autonomous technologies to enrich the user experience through collaboration. Web 2.0 is comprised of a highly interactive, intelligent set of tools that are co-dependent and act more like a service than a system, working together like the synapses of the brain. Web 2.0 tools like platforms (e.g. Wikipedia), video and image communities (e.g. YouTube) and link collections (e.g. del.icio.us) provide easy access to information where every user can contribute, change improve upon existing content. Referred to as collective intelligence, these collaborative sites provide a virtual space for diversity, quality and controlled content and encourage exchange and participation. Which of the Following Definitions of Enterprise 2.0 Most Closely Aligns with Your Definition? Figure 1 AIIM, Market IQ, Q1 2008 “Enterprise 2.0: Agile, Emergent & Integrated.” www.opentext.com 1
  • 4. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 More than just the sum of its parts, Web 2.0 connects people with their processes and content on the Web through these collaborative spaces, resulting in meaningful idea exchanges. Enterprise 2.0 is the use of Web 2.0 in a business context, a paradigm shift in the way we traditionally construct and conduct business, regard knowledge and interact with stakeholders. The world of work is changing. The increasing globalisation of commerce, economic uncertainties, demographic shifts in the workplace, greening of the enterprise, excess of email and regulatory legitimisation of 2.0 tools are compelling organisations to rethink traditional content communication and the way we define a knowledge worker. Organisations must address these forces to stay competitive, deliver services, manage risks and costs and protect the corporate memory that resides in employees and applications. A Social Workplace and a Social Marketplace raise productivity even as resources become scarce: they tap into the collected intelligence across employees, customers and other external stakeholders and they open the door to mentorship and knowledge sharing to information workers who are not traditional desktop PC users. The ability to enhance a company’s online presence with user-generated content and other Web applications presents an ideal opportunity for organisations that seek to communicate more efficiently with internal and external audiences. The enterprise with a vision to reach a more mature level of collaborative culture will provide easy access to socially networked communities via Web or mobile devices, opening the door to content sharing, information exchange and mentorship with a broader range of people: employees in the field or remote locations and trusted advisors, clients and partners. www.opentext.com 2
  • 5. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Cultivating Enterprise 2.0 Culture Enterprise 2.0 is not just a fad; it is a social and cultural movement that relies on real business drivers and a shift in understanding the framework around an organisation’s communications, processes and structure. There are numerous technological and sociological changes that support the creation, utilisation and future development of social computing and Enterprise 2.0 and users are looking for the next level of interactivity. Moreover, a new generation of online users are coming of age during a period where the ability to communicate via the Web is not only widely accepted but almost second nature. Never before has the ability to publicise one's opinion, personal information and professional expertise been as easy or accessible as in today's world of online communication. But this cultural shift explains why just as many companies are struggling with Enterprise 2.0 today as are thriving. In a recent report, McKinsey found that although organisations plan to spend more than ever on Web 2.0, “as many survey respondents are dissatisfied with their use of Web 2.0 technologies as are satisfied. Many of the dissenters cite impediments such as organisational structure, the ability of managers to understand the new levers of change and a lack of understanding about how value is created using Web 2.0 tools.”1 Figure 2 The McKinsey Quarterly, June 2008, “Building the Web 2.0 Enterprise.” www.opentext.com 3
  • 6. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Enterprise 2.0 is not technology heavy; it is culture laden. The expenditure required to create an Enterprise 2.0-ready organisation is relatively light and inexpensive, an overlay on existing technologies. It is true, however, that organisations that integrate Web 2.0 too early or without a well-prepared implementation strategy are usually unsuccessful due to immature technology, excessively rapid implementation or common human error. But with a solid technological foundation, innovation on top of existing mature technologies provides a significant head start over attempts to build 2.0 solutions from the ground up. With the right foundation, organisations do not have to reconcile Enterprise 2.0 technology or usability–they need to cultivate Enterprise 2.0 culture. Excluding the incoming workforce, the shift into the digital world has taken a lot of change management for workers raised on paper. Even today, the use of computers still is not wholly embraced by employees who dealt with paper for decades. Although they find computers helpful, these workers often admit that they are not entirely comfortable. Adopting new systems and programs and working around bugs has been a struggle for many of the paper generation. Introduce Enterprise 2.0 and treat it like yet another system that workers have to master for the sake of management and failure is imminent. But using a solid ECM system and best-of-breed Web 2.0 technologies combined with a culture that champions leadership, balances freedom and control and values the harnessing of knowledge, you can make Enterprise 2.0 easy to use and relevant to your workforce. By establishing a supportive foundation both technologically and socially, this collaborative technology will take hold. Leadership As detailed in the McKinsey report “Six Ways to Make Web 2.0 Work,” successful Enterprise 2.0 essentially requires a “[b]ottom-up cultural shift that needs the support of the top. Senior executives often become role models and lead through information channels to build participation…A higher level of usage is found at companies that encourage [Web 2.0 technology] by using tactics such as integrating the tools into existing work plans, launching Web 2.0 in conjunction with other strategic initiatives and getting senior managers to act as role models for adoption…Dissatisfied respondents are likely to note [more barriers to Web 2.0 technology] including the inability of management to grasp the potential financial return for Web 2.0, unresponsive corporate cultures and less-than enthusiastic leaders.”2 Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, might say that enterprises need to look for the connectors and mavens in their organisation to incite Enterprise 2.0 participation. Connectors are people reachable by anyone in the enterprise in only a few steps; they occupy many different worlds, subcultures and niches.3 Mavens, on the other hand, “have the knowledge and social skills to start word-of-mouth epidemics. What sets mavens apart, though, is not so much what they know but how they pass it along. The fact that mavens want to help, for no other reason than because they like to help, turns out to be an awfully effective way of getting someone’s attention.”4 In other words, organisations need to elect people to lead this cultural www.opentext.com 4
  • 7. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 shift who have the connections, skills and knowledge to make valuable contributions. To make Enterprise 2.0 successful, managers and influencers within an organisation should respect two well-defined characteristics of leadership: having a clear vision and trusting in your people. Enterprise 2.0 is a cultural shift that needs a clear commitment from leadership; it is about giving employees, an organisation’s greatest asset, the baseline for enriched engagement and productivity so that they can grow to their full potential. Championing Corporate Communications – Blogs Leadership considerations must be carried through to corporate blogging. A corporate blog should align with preconceived organisational goals and strategies, but unless it is a marketing-specific blog, it is not a place for press releases, blatant marketing or public news; it is a medium for exploring corporate culture, values, strategies and direction. Figure 3 The McKinsey Quarterly, June 2008, “Building the Web 2.0 Enterprise.” “Forrester Research looked at 90 blogs from Fortune 500 companies and found that most corporate blogs are ‘dull, drab and don’t stimulate discussion.’ Sadly, two-thirds hardly ever get any comments, 70 percent stick strictly to business topics and worse 56 percent just republish press releases or already-public news. That has led many to think that corporate blogging isn’t really worth much effort.”5 The reason why so many of the corporate blogs that Forrester evaluated were unsuccessful was precisely because enterprises “think that corporate blogging isn’t really worth much effort.” Although the medium is more personable than www.opentext.com 5
  • 8. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 other marketing methods, such as articles and ads, enterprises must not take blogs for granted. As discussed previously, an enterprise must elect people to lead this cultural shift who have the connections, skills and knowledge to make valuable contributions. Blogs have to be respected as a vital component in an organisation’s overarching branding and communications strategy. A corporate blog must be contributed to and monitored regularly to prevent stale material and to keep readers interested. An important component of successful blogs is to enable feedback and introduce forums for further discussion, helping to inspire participation and interaction. Thought leadership in blogs becomes meaningless if stakeholders are not permitted to enrich the discussion with their experiences and views; preventing employees, partners and customers a voice undermines the value to the company and of the tool itself, which is meant to illicit open, trustful and transparent discussion to help improve enterprise goals and strategies. Think bottom-up. Because of the diversity of stakeholders apt to publish to a corporate blog, an enterprise needs to choose Web 2.0 technology that is easy for everyone to use, whether technically inclined or not. With a good technological foundation that encourages usability, policies should be developed with the organisation’s Legal team to protect confidential information such as trade secrets, financial data and even personal details. Potential structure for enterprise blogs:  Employee blogs for projects, working documentation and internal knowledge networking  PR blogs for communicating with various target groups, such as the media, investors and customers  Marketing blogs for publishing company information and syndication in external media  Forums for engaging customers, partners and other target groups in discussions and processes, such as support forums for customers Balancing Freedom and Control But how do you get management buy-in for this bottom-up shift? Management has traditionally been the gatekeeper of enterprise knowledge, but with Enterprise 2.0, control over information is given to all participants. In his book Everything is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Order, David Weinberger explains that “the change [management is] facing from [Enterprise 2.0] is deep and real. Authorities have long filtered and organised information for us, protecting us from what isn’t worth our time and helping us find what we need to give our beliefs a sturdy foundation. But with [Enterprise 2.0], it’s all available to us, unfiltered. This creates a conundrum for businesses as they enter the digital order. If they don’t allow their users to structure information for themselves, they’ll lose their patrons. If they do allow patrons to structure information for themselves, the organisations will lose much of their authority, power and control.”6 . www.opentext.com 6
  • 9. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Figure 4 The McKinsey Quarterly, February 2009, “Six Ways to Make Web 2.0 Work.” The benefits of social computing need to be weighed against the associated risks, but the right Enterprise 2.0 solutions have security controls, such as auditing trails that divulge information about all transactions. In addition, users should be able to flag unscrupulous information. In effect, to be successful, an organisation must exercise a balance between freedom and control when it comes to Enterprise 2.0. “Prudent managers should work with Legal, IT and HR security functions to establish reasonable policies, such as prohibiting anonymous posting. Fears are often overblown, however and the social norms enforced by users in the participating communities can be very effective at policing user exchanges and negotiating risk.” 7 Aside from security controls, some argue that Enterprise 2.0 is not safe because users will have free reign to share confidential enterprise information. And, with access to all sorts of data and a degree of power over content, there are worries that the “inmates will be running the asylum.” But Enterprise 2.0 is not about relinquishing all knowledge and control; it is about contributing information that employees can use to improve their performance, customer service and time-to- market. www.opentext.com 7
  • 10. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 The risks of social computing in the enterprise:  Ownership of content is delegated to a community of users rather than one individual.  Editors have less control over what gets published on the Web site.  Quality assurance is the responsibility of the user community. Technical problems that could emerge in the enterprise:  Security loopholes via separate content and user repositories.  Infiltration by hackers, spam bots and other undesired spam.  Heterogeneous software platforms conceal risks in security and use of content by unwanted third parties. However, with the proper benchmarks in place, social computing can benefit companies in a variety of ways:  Improved, structured communication to support business processes.  Increased use of collective intelligence for quality assurance.  More diversity through the inclusion of individual specialist knowledge.  Additional visibility and speed through broader authorship.  Enhanced productivity through positioning as an expert in the community. What are share workspaces best suited for in your company? Figure 5 The Gilbane Group, June 2008, “Collaboration and Social Media - 2008.” www.opentext.com 8
  • 11. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Making Enterprise 2.0 Safe Like email, the tools of Web 2.0 are forms of digital content that record communications between people. As such, Web 2.0 generated content has many of the same issues that were discovered with email in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Both litigators and regulators seek to uncover employee communications and decisions and the choices made through Web 2.0 applications are no exception. Using the principles developed for email and the proper use of content management technologies to preserve and destroy records within the organisation, it is possible to create similar Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC) processes for Web 2.0 content and collaboration. Many applications within Web 2.0 involve the sharing of unstructured content, including documents and image files. The natural tendency of Web 2.0 applications to operate outside of business departments, cutting across traditional organisational boundaries, creates an interesting challenge for GRC. Because Web 2.0 operates outside of conventional constraints, developing, monitoring and managing content control policies becomes more complicated. Another issue with GRC for Web 2.0 is cost. Web 2.0 makes use of every byte of a data stream available to present compelling uses of content and conversation. Currently, Web 2.0 content and file transfers are the driving forces for storage and bandwidth on the Internet, eclipsing email as the dominant application. The vast networks of Web 2.0 application servers will continue to expand, driving both storage and bandwidth costs while IT budgets dwindle. Clearly, a thoughtful approach to developing a GRC process for Web 2.0 applications is required. There are simply not enough servers and fiber lines in the world today to digitise every conversation of every person on the Internet. The growing Web 2.0 risk management problem needs to be addressed fundamentally, from the ground up. Part of the core approach is to recognise that not all content is created equally. Different kinds of Web 2.0 applied content need to be retained for different periods of time; the challenge lies in identifying the important content, separating that important information from the unimportant and determining an appropriate retention period. The “content lifecycle” concept – what is done with collaborations and content after they have been processed – introduces another important aspect of Web 2.0 content management. The lifecycle of Web 2.0 content can be divided into three different phases:  Active Phase: During the short active phase, people work with the information contained in Web 2.0 content such as wikis; they respond to blogs and create conversation threads.  Reference Phase: During the reference phase, Web 2.0 content is retrieved from the file store as required.  Evidence Phase: During the evidence phase, Web 2.0 content is primarily used to address regulatory concerns—a blog or an instant message from a chat room is a business record in many contexts and must therefore be retained for the same time period as any other record in the same classification. Retention (and disposition) policies can be purely internal or imposed by an external regulatory body. www.opentext.com 9
  • 12. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Knowledge as Currency Organisations need to realise the value of owning their data, of treating knowledge as currency. Enterprise 2.0 is a combination of tools used to harness this knowledge. At its most rudimentary, think of Enterprise 2.0 as a bank machine tied to an account with ever-increasing value. To start with, users must have access to the account and a security code to make deposits or withdrawals. Once inside, all of your transactions are monitored and recorded. You can only take the amount of currency that has been deposited since there is no credit, but thankfully, the account balance never depletes. If you make withdrawals and never deposits, the value is stagnant. And when employees change jobs or leave the company, their deposits stay in the account. By creating this account, by putting information into a system that is shared by all, value is constantly compounded. Instead of having silos or separate accounts for each department that are inaccessible by other employees an organisation becomes what it was meant to be: a grand, interconnected web of knowledge and data, rich in compounding currency. Today’s enterprises rely on these knowledge shares, but they have to be about more than just plain data. Enterprise 2.0 embodies the culmination of what Daniel Pink calls the notion of high concept and high touch.ix With Web 1.0 technologies such as ECM, knowledge shares were created and laid the foundation for Web 2.0 technologies and social networking. Through the exchange of content and knowledge in social networks, the subtleties of human interaction are embraced, narrative developed and purpose and meaning stretched alongside the concept of time and space. In effect, knowledge workers can free themselves from the isolating confines of their desk and collaborate with practically anyone, anywhere in the world, at almost any time. With tools such as communities, mash-ups, instant messaging and blogs, a worker can contribute information in real time across the organisation. And in combination with a solid ECM system that includes Digital Asset Management, workers can share documents, video, photos, blurbs–practically anything they desire. Realising the Virtual Enterprise So far, this paper has discussed how to successfully implement an Enterprise 2.0 strategy. By laying a solid foundation, an organisation can focus on overlaying social networking technologies and cultivating the Web 2.0 culture to bloom–from electing knowledgeable leaders to balancing freedom and control to regarding knowledge as currency. We know that the culture of Enterprise 2.0 is bottom-up and that management will have to accept the free flow of ideas and data within the digitised organisation. But what of the traditional structure of an organisation, the physical brick and mortar, the office furniture, the lunchroom and the nine-to- five workday? Enterprise 2.0 has created an alternative business universe, a Social Workplace and Marketplace and for many, “every day, more of our life is lived there... Instead of atoms that take up room, it’s made of bits. Instead of making us walk long aisles, in the digital world everything is only a few clicks away. Instead of having to be the same way for all people, it can instantly rearrange itself for each person and each person’s current task. Instead of being limited by space and operational www.opentext.com 10
  • 13. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 simplicity in the number of items it can stock, the digital world can include every item and variation [customers] could possibly want. These differences are significant. But they’re just the starting point. For something much larger is at stake. The physical limitations that silently guide how we organise our businesses have guided and limited how we organise knowledge itself. From management structures to encyclopedias to the courses of study we put our children through to the way we decide what’s worth believing, we have organised our ideas with principles designed for use in a world limited by the laws of physics.”8 For the knowledge worker, the Social Workplace transcends physical workspace, moving away from buildings with desks, offices and cubicles; because the knowledge worker is most productive in the digital realm, the physical realm can be almost anywhere. As well, the conventional categorisations that have limited information management – divisions not unlike the walls between offices – begin to break down. From atoms to bits, the interconnectedness created by Enterprise 2.0 removes the limits on how we organise information and our lives. Enterprise 2.0 unites stakeholders globally, at anytime, with the people, process and content they need. Although technology is the enabler, Enterprise 2.0 relies on participation; both people and technology need to work in tandem to make Enterprise 2.0 a success. As a result, new jobs will be formed, new leaders found, new customers unearthed, new information brought forth. The consequences are limitless. But enterprises need to understand this cultural shift by being open to possibilities. “[In the digital universe] knowledge doesn’t have a shape. There are just too many useful, powerful and beautiful ways to make sense of our world.” 9 www.opentext.com 11
  • 14. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Business Drivers of Enterprise 2.0 Organisations will have different objectives for social computing depending on the industry and the positioning of products and services offered to the marketplace. However, irrespective of product or industry, the success of a company's social computing strategy will be based on how well it is integrated with corporate culture and processes. All companies share the common goal of building stronger networks, connecting internal and external target groups and improving communication channels throughout the organisation; social computing can transform content recipients into suppliers of rich and useful information. Optimise Customer Service As your organisation is compelled to serve more customers with fewer resources in this financial environment, companies need to use innovative tactics to meet quality metrics, cultivate loyalty and ensure repeat business. Engagement and the cultivation of new opportunities with customers are possible with transparency, peer-to-peer support and two-way dialogue with clients, providing a new customer engagement model uniquely offered by rich interactive media. Companies today are achieving targets, pipeline generation and cost-reduction goals by using focus groups, self-service sites, discussion groups, online rich media catalogues, test drive centers and feedback management systems: this is the new language of customer service and engagement in the 2.0-enabled world. The Social Marketplace of products, policies and ideas generates loyalty, commitment and inspires information exchange. Enable Channels and Partnership Networks The ecosystem of business has always extended to a network of contractors, outside specialists, suppliers and partners. Responding to common challenges, competitive pressures and new opportunities means a shared clarity of purpose, responsibility and ability to accurately exchange information. Enterprise 2.0 delivers the fabric to hold trusted relationships together to meet shared business and personal objectives. Efficiencies and expert sources emerge, reducing the duplication of efforts, the reinvention of content and minimising the consumption of inaccurate or incomplete information as the collected wisdom of the network quickly vets and ranks content. Companies that can capitalise in the knowledge economy find new revenue sources by packaging and monetising their experience and intellectual property for their external trusted network. Social supply chains emerge as organisations adopt rich Web and mobile based communities to communicate shared content, set mutual objectives and adopt common customer service obligations. www.opentext.com 12
  • 15. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Spot Opportunities in Unexpected Places The rise of personal and consumer social networking sites provides opportunity for people to converse, collaborate and discuss a range of topics, interests and preferences. Word-of-mouth recommendations from trusted peer networks carry a heavy weight when consumers or businesses are looking to invest time and money in products or services. Capitalising on this interaction and providing timely education to prospects and targeted audiences can be a tremendous competitive advantage for the organisation willing to extend Enterprise 2.0 to where interested and informed people congregate. It is important to note that the Social Marketplace – even as it moves into the less moderated open Web – succeeds only when authenticity underpins the development of this extended trusted network. Ensuring the prevention of unauthorised disclosure and consistency of message and brand with Social Compliance mitigates the risk of inappropriate communication or inaccurate representation to new markets and prospects. Cultivate Brand Engagement and Loyalty The concept of a brand is no longer limited to colour schemes or logos. Modern and emerging mediums provide the expectation of interactive, involved, bi- directional communication. Companies with a strong brand image must work through these new channels and customer expectations to ensure that the perception of their image matches the state desired by the enterprise. The days when a customer’s only online interaction with a brand was a Web site URL are gone. Organisations that fail to heed customer feedback risk reputation damage. Enterprise 2.0 delivers on the recognition that customers who invest time, money and resources with your company expect to be viewed as a stakeholder in key decisions. The one-way push of marketing or technical content to customers and prospects no longer resonates; the socially networked world requires interactive engagement: customer reviews, recommendations, feedback and consultation on product and service delivery. The Social Marketplace provides the trusted community in which such interaction can take place in an authentic yet appropriately moderated capacity. Use Customer and Partner Communities Companies can strengthen their relationship with existing customers by offering them a platform upon which they can present their experiences with the company's services and products. By reading reviews that other consumers have submitted, new customers have the opportunity to gather information from neutral sources to form an opinion. More companies are harnessing the innovation found in online communities by creating a place where customers and partners can participate in product improvement via the Web. www.opentext.com 13
  • 16. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Manage Human Capital Recruitment, attraction and the cultivation of a skilled workforce remain an expensive challenge for organisations. Organisations that operate with diverse teams, multilingual employees or siloed business units can benefit from the Social Workplace in the area of human capital management. Skills and learning management, recruitment, employee on-boarding and mentorship, alumni networks, succession planning and career development are the key functions that often determine an organisation’s ability to attract, maintain and cultivate a talented employee base. Collaborative tools deliver in-house networks that weave the strong social fabric of trust, connection and shared goals among colleagues. Accelerating employee engagement by articulating goals, company culture, values and expectations builds a sense of teamwork and shared objectives, even across the hierarchies of a formal organisational chart. Provide Self-Service and Peer-to-Peer Empowerment Productive teams share common goals and a sense of purpose–as well as experience, information and lessons-learned–with their peers. However, the world of the information worker today often feels less than optimal: spending time on repetitive tasks, struggling with email inbox overload and trying to track down the right teams or individuals to help get correct answers to urgent questions. Measurable productivity gains, reduced search times and efficient reuse of shared content are demonstrated with simple and intuitive Web-based content creation tools like FAQs, site-visit notes, project knowledge bases, product documentation or meeting notes. Community-friendly tools suited to team environments capture this essential content while ensuring the personal perspective remains intact. The easy location of in-house experts, regardless of level or role, becomes a natural part of internal knowledge discovery. Protect and Value Corporate Memory Preserving corporate memory–the content, context and discussion that result from engaging with peers and markets, leading to decisions and actions–is essential for continuity of operations, consistency of goals, archival preservation and the education of employees. The capture of content alone, however, is not sufficient. Forums, wikis, blogs and other collaboration tools can be used to allow people to share, reuse and learn from collected knowledge and to contribute to productivity and accurate information disclosure. Internally managed knowledge bases provide employees with easy access and efficient utilisation of this company information in one, central location. Investing in an intranet strategy that incorporates Web 2.0 capabilities encourages knowledge sharing and ongoing collaboration provides a greater degree of topicality, relevance and diversity for organisational content and corporate communication in a secure and central repository. www.opentext.com 14
  • 17. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Achieve Transparency and Corporate Governance It is vital that executive management communicates with employees about shared objectives, strategy, values and culture. Knowledge sharing and more transparent collaborative tools allow for broader perspectives and internal expertise to voice concerns on patterns of risk or incorrect assumptions. Companies in sectors that are highly regulated often struggle to educate all employees, including frontline, field and remote workers regarding obligations to observe health, safety, disclosure or information-handling policies. The Social Workplace enables consistent communication to educate and inform by moving beyond traditional methods to rich discussion and peer-to-peer support networks. Audio, video and rich graphic content transcend language, geography and generations to communicate acceptable practices and instill understanding. Support the Virtual Enterprise As economic difficulties hit a broad range of industries across the globe, many organisations will find access to capital stalled, which can result in consolidation of traditional brick and mortar facilities. With more organisations looking to operate virtually, it is important to provide an online experience of engagement and productivity for employees who work away from the physical office. Geographical separation can lead to a disconnection from team or organisational goals. The adoption of a Social Workplace allows distributed organisations to offer the same virtual water cooler networking experience to remote staff as office-based employees. It can also open awareness to all employees of hidden skills and undervalued experience, facilitate finding common interests and encourage the building of personal trust among colleagues. Empower the Frontline Sales teams, customer service representatives, marketers, inspectors and emergency responders are mobile professionals who require accurate, timely data at their fingertips; they need this information to move quickly to execute on opportunities. Often, the most accurate intelligence on field conditions, competitors, hazards or safety issues will come through first-hand observational knowledge. Organisations that get better at capturing and disseminating the intrinsic knowledge held in the frontline field will find competitive advantage with the Social Workplace. Quick and easy Web or mobile capture of data, images or text notes shared with a broader team leads to timely awareness of trends and conditions on the road. Companies can flourish by allowing this field intelligence to become a part of mainstream corporate memory. Seeking input directly from frontline services deepens collected wisdom and allows responsiveness to changing conditions. www.opentext.com 15
  • 18. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Open Text and Enterprise 2.0 Enterprise 2.0 allows organisations to take advantage of the technology innovations of Web 2.0 to meet business objectives and Open Text delivers on this vision by making 2.0 safe. ECM has evolved to support collaboration between people within and outside an organisation. Web 2.0 opens new channels of person-to-person information exchange to find hidden expertise and deliver on the promise of enhanced productivity at a low cost. Open Text facilitates cooperation among your information workers by providing a secure and managed collaborative environment that helps to orchestrate your people, processes and content to achieve strategic success. Social and rich media-driven Web experiences and mobile accessibility can deliver meaningful and measurable results. Whether building customer loyalty and retention as part of Social Marketplace or bridging communication gaps among staff in the Social Workplace, 2.0 technology and behaviours enrich these experiences. Figure 6 Aberdeen Group Report, June 2008, “Customer 2.0. The Business Implications of Social Media.” www.opentext.com 16
  • 19. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Open Text and Social Computing Open Text Web Solutions provides an ideal platform for creating content quickly and easily while delivering it dynamically and in a personalised context. Many of the problems and risks associated with social computing are minimised or eradicated through the use of Open Text Web Solutions by deploying collaboration tools across a uniform and secure Web Content Management (WCM) platform. External systems can be dynamically linked with the support of commonly used interfaces through mash-ups that allow the enrichment of content through data and external applications. Targeted Content Delivery Open Text Web Solutions makes it possible to automatically and proactively deliver the right content to the right Web visitor at the specific time of need. Explicit personalisation allows specific content to be served up to an identified, logged-in Web visitor. This type of content can include, for example, a customised list of product documentation based on purchase history or a list of relevant news articles based on previously identified preferences. Implicit personalisation enables Web sites to learn from a user's behaviour and respond with content that meets their needs in real time. For example, Open Text Web Solutions will deliver information based on an unidentified visitor’s level of interest in a particular item or recommend similar items for future purchases. Web site visitors automatically see the content that is relevant to them without explicitly logging onto a Web site, extranet or intranet. By supporting Web site behaviour with optimised content, companies can drive customer motivations by focusing on benefits and encouraging purchases that they may not have considered prior to browsing the site. Developing a strategy for combining contextual delivery with user-generated content is inherent to online success. Web content and user entries must be linked logically in order to present content within a context that makes sense to the user. Open Text Web Solutions provides administrative controls that easily manage user profiles and assign appropriate metadata to ensure that users receive content that is relevant to their needs. www.opentext.com 17
  • 20. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Success Stories from The Content Experts™ Northrop Grumman Accelerates Employee Productivity 10 Northrop Grumman uses Open Text solutions to support more than 40,000 users from different business sectors enterprise-wide. Prior to implementing the system, knowledge sharing was done via emails, phone calls and one-on-one conversations. The organisation now uses Open Text to provide online communities and 2.0 capabilities, such as blogs and forums to bring together people with similar backgrounds and interests or expertise, improving communication and knowledge sharing. Open Text’s rich interface enables users to customise the look and feel of their Web site within corporate and brand guidelines, create their own graphics, bring in data and essentially offer a one-stop shop for members, which is the reason why many groups at Northrop Grumman are taking advantage of the Community module to exchange information for each specific area. The key to Northrop Grumman’s success with 2.0 is their embrace of the culture. Employees are able to see the benefits of participation; be it resolving a problem or looking for an expert, they know that information is readily available as a result of everyone’s efforts. STA Travel Reaches Out to New Markets 11 STA Travel is the world’s largest student travel organisation and drives 80 percent of its customer engagement on the Internet. Their global e-commerce technology strategy ensures expeditious deployment and control across multiple Web sites while still offering the flexibility and adaptability to tailor local content to regional needs and demands. STA Travel uses Open Text Web Solutions’ powerful and easy-to-use localisation capabilities for creating different language variants while ensuring that the appearance is consistent globally. For delivering contextualised content to visitors, STA Travel has been able to integrate dynamic content from other relevant Web sites, providing a one-stop destination for comprehensive information and advice on travel. STA Travel also allows Web visitors to create their own user profiles and to read other visitor’s travel journals. Keeping friends and family updated while travelling has never been easier. CARE Canada Empowers Women 12 CARE Canada uses Open Text ECM as its primary tool for information storage, knowledge sharing and distribution to help support their I Am Powerful campaign. CARE’s community-based programs in approximately 70 countries place a special focus on working with women because they are disproportionately affected by poverty and crucial to fighting it. Comprised of women responsible for spreading the I Am Powerful message within their own circles of the organisation, the users from CARE’s reference group champion the repository filled with documents for distribution, information for personal use and in-depth knowledge. It has proven to encourage collaboration and informational consistency throughout the organisation within a secure repository. When there is a story about a community or person in need or a partner or advertising request that requires immediate attention, Open Text’s 2.0 tools help to instantly capture the opportunity and deliver CARE’s I Am Powerful message worldwide. www.opentext.com 18
  • 21. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Conclusion The next generation of corporate content has begun to enter the mainstream enterprise. Information workers are increasingly interacting with peers, partner networks and markets with simple tools that can be consumed over the Web or on mobile devices. People are connected with shared purpose, collected knowledge and experiences and meaningful content. Communication can now flow across geographies, generation gaps and language barriers. The demands of this uncertain and competitive world demand adaptation, strong networks and creativity. Companies that are ready to embrace this change recognise that Enterprise 2.0 is able to contribute to increased top-line revenue as well as decreased bottom- line costs. Bringing engagement, productivity and cost-effective communication to a culture of safe and trusted sharing uncovers new channels for innovation and competitive advantage. Whether targeting internal stakeholders by cultivating the Social Workplace or engaging with external audiences in the Social Marketplace, embracing a more open, transparent enterprise wraps employees, partners and customers into the trusted social fabric that is your ecosystem. Enterprise 2.0 will not be without challenges. Organisations must be prepared to work through the cultural and change management challenges implicit in new approaches to solving problems. Managers and influencers must recognise their leadership responsibilities in championing the bottom-up cultural shift. They must also be open to electing new leaders as they emerge, cognisant of the balance between the freedom and control of individuals and information needed for success. Workers now have the power share information like never before, interact with more subject experts and break down information silos that have typically confined the information worker. The virtual office gives an enterprise the power to connect people regardless of location or language. Teams are united, developing a sense of purpose, promoting transparency and protecting corporate memory. By extending Enterprise 2.0 to partners and clients, customer service and brand engagement are leveraged. Open Text Web Solutions supports companies in the quick implementation and secure use of their Web 2.0 and social computing platforms. Forums and blogs are easily displayed and searchable within a context that makes sense to the user while protecting the author's content within a secure and controlled environment. As Web 2.0 and social computing technologies introduce new ways for users to create, direct and rate corporate content, content relevancy and interactive applications will become even more important in helping to build a rewarding user experience. Working in tandem, a solid technological foundation such as the best-of-breed solutions from Open Text and an accommodating corporate culture will allow Enterprise 2.0 take hold. www.opentext.com 19
  • 22. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 Definitions Social Marketplace The Social Marketplace recognises that the Web has opened up conversations among customers, prospects, employees and other trusted advisors. Business is increasingly done based on peer-to-peer or word-of-mouth recommendations. Organisations that see the value of Web and mobile interaction with their external stakeholders can preserve market share, accelerate pipelines, cultivate customer loyalty and reduce the costs of frontline customer service. The fundamental values that the Social Marketplace can deliver include customer engagement and proactive peer-to-peer support and recommendations, the development and solidification of communication and recommendation channels, the ability to spot and react to new opportunities for markets and prospecting and community engagement with your brand to build loyalty and customer commitment. Social Workplace The Social Workplace is an ideal expression of Web 2.0 technologies to connect people with their peers and with critical content and information. Culturally, it helps break down hierarchical and administrative barriers to innovation and idea exchange among employees. Technologically, it introduces simpler content creation and communication tools and uses the Web to bridge geographical and generational gaps. Where individual knowledge was previously hidden, successful companies are seeing shared information and experiences becoming part of corporate culture. Employees who actively share their knowledge emerge as experts and companies that encourage employees to share their knowledge build stronger networks. Social Compliance Social Compliance is a necessary consideration for organisations that recognise the value of the Social Workplace and Social Marketplace but need to balance the risks inherent in opening new channels of communication. Traditional compliance pressures are reactive: records retention mandates and restrictive access to content are often driven by external regulations. Beyond the reactive compliance compelled by regulation and e-discovery rules, Social Compliance ensures proactive prevention of unauthorised information exchange as communication channels become more transparent and allows the enterprise to monitor outward facing communication to ensure appropriate use and disclosure practices are respected. Social Compliance brings a protective layer to the Social Workplace and Social Marketplace by providing the assurance and comfort to corporate legal and management that a more open culture will not compromise consistency of message, brand, vision, risk leaking proprietary information, personal data or inappropriate language. www.opentext.com 20
  • 23. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 About Open Text Connect People, Process and Content Remaining agile and innovative in a challenging economy requires a new perspective on productivity and performance to achieve competitive advantage. Open Text envisions a world in which our customers orchestrate their people, processes and content to achieve strategic success. Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is not just about controlling and managing business content and the repositories where it resides. It is about understanding the relationships between people, processes and content in an organisation. It is about documenting how content flows within and across departments and how it is experienced in the marketplace. It is about the systems content touches, the processes it is tied to and the people it empowers. It is about experiencing all types of content and managing it across an entire lifecycle from creation and collaboration through to consumption and disposal. The Content Experts: Learn from Shared Experience With 17 years experience in helping organisations across every industry and around the globe overcome the challenges associated with managing business content, Open Text stands unmatched in the ECM market. With more than 46,000 successful deployments globally and by fostering truly collaborative relationships with our customers and business partners, Open Text has developed a keen understanding of how content flows throughout an enterprise and how organisations can leverage it to drive growth, mitigate risk and generate business advantage. Our knowledge of the business challenges organisations face today and the richest array of content management applications and solutions in the industry, along with our ability to provide organisations with the guidance required to most effectively address these challenges based on rich subject matter and domain expertise, makes Open Text, along with our customers and partners, The Content Experts. www.opentext.com 21
  • 24. Leading the Cultural Shift to Enterprise 2.0 1 Jacques Bughin, James Manyika and Andy Miller, “Building the Web 2.0 Enterprise,” The McKinsey Quarterly (July 2008). 2 Michael Chui andy Miller and Roger P. Roberts, “Six ways to make Web 2.0 work,” The McKinsey Quarterly (February 2009). 3 Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (New York: Black Bay Books, 2002), p. 48. 4 Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (New York: Black Bay Books, 2002), p. 67. 5 Ben Worthen, Most Corporate Blogs Are Unimaginative Failures, http://blogs.wsj.com/biztech/2008/06/30/most-corporate-blogs-are-unimaginative-failures (The Wall Street Journal: June 2008). 6 David Weinberger, Everything is Miscellaneous, The Power of the New Digital Order (New York: Times Books, 2007), p. 132-133. 7 Michael Chui andy Miller and Roger P. Roberts, “Six ways to make Web 2.0 work,” The McKinsey Quarterly (February 2009). 8 David Weinberger, Everything is Miscellaneous, The Power of the New Digital Order (New York: Times Books, 2007), p. 8. 9 David Weinberger, Everything is Miscellaneous, The Power of the New Digital Order (New York: Times Books, 2007), p. 50. 10 http://www.opentext.com/download/livelinkdownload.html?path=/corporate/customer/casestudy/ northrup-grumman-ss.pdf 11 http://websolutions.opentext.com/customers_case_study_sta_travel.htm 12 https://www.opentext.com/download/livelinkdownload.html?path=/corporate/customer/casestudy/ care-canada-powerful-ss.pdf Sales Corporate Headquarters European Headquarters www.opentext.com 275 Frank Tompa Drive Technopark 2 sales@opentext.com Waterloo, ON Werner-von-Siemens-Ring 20 N2L 0A1 D-85630 Grasbrunn North America Sales Canada Germany 1 800 499 6544 Phone:+1 519 888 7111 Phone:+49 89 4629 0 International Sales Fax:+1 519 888 0677 Fax:+49 89 4629 1199 1 8004996 5440 If you are an Open Text partner or customer, visit online.opentext.com for more information about this and other Open Text solutions. Open Text is a publicly traded company on the NASDAQ (OTEX) and the TSX (OTC). © Copyright 2009 by Open Text Corporation. Open Text, The Content Experts and Livelink ECM are trademarks or registered trademarks of Open Text Corporation. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved. www.opentext.com 22

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