The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study

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These days, everybody in online media seems to be talking about content. The same questions keep coming up: Do authorship and originality really matter? …

These days, everybody in online media seems to be talking about content. The same questions keep coming up: Do authorship and originality really matter?

Why do users choose one brand of content over another? How can online publishers create brands that users care about? To find the answers, we looked at the hard numbers.

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  • 1. - - The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study Final Report September, 2010 Commissioned by AOL The Future is Seen Content Now 2010
  • 2.
    • Introduction
    • To better serve the AOL business and the publishing and advertising industries of which it is a part, AOL has commissioned D&MC to undertake a study the defines the relationship between consumers and online content. Specifically, it seeks to develop and deliver insights into each of the following areas:
        • Define what it means to consumers and how they talk about it.
        • Uncover patterns of consumer behavior in seeking content.
        • Understand relative importance of content value drivers (e.g., brand, author, advertisers, site, timeliness, etc.).
        • Determine impact of content type on behaviors and attitudes.
        • Understand the impact of advertising on the user content experience.
        • Pursue an understanding of any other relevant consumer insights that may emerge in the exploratory research process.
    Background The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study
      • Content:
      • Behaviors:
      • Value:
      • Impact:
      • Advertising:
      • Other:
    - - Table of Contents Background..……………………..….…… 2 Methodology.…………………...………….5 Executive Summary……………..………. 6 Implications for Content Development…13 Content……………….…………….……..16 Aggregated & Original Content.………...38 Paying For Content…….……….………..45 Max Diff Assessment: Content Hierarchy..………………….……………...51 Advertising……………...……….………...58 Influences on Content..…………….…. ...64 Use of Websites ……...……….…………72 Profiling ………………...……….…………76
  • 3.
    • The following report is based on an integration of three stages for this research study. The three stages are as follows:
    • Stage 1 of this research consisted of 12 focus groups that were conducted among Consumers in four markets: New York, Denver, Charlotte and Indianapolis. In each market groups were segmented as follows:
      • Age 18 to 34 year olds;
      • Age 35 to 69 year olds;
      • “ Lifestyle” (mix of age).
    • Stage 2 of this research consisted of an online quantitative assessment.
    • Stage 3 of this research consisted of Personal Interviews with Advertising Professionals and Content Producers.
    Background The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 4.
    • Acknowledgements of Industry Expert Participation
    • A special thanks to the following industry experts who shared their time and perspectives to help guide the scope and context of this study.
    • David Bell , Chairman Emeritus, The Interpublic Group
    • David-Michel Davies , Executive Director, International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences
    • Keith A. Grossman , Associate Publisher, WIRED
    • Michael Hayes , EVP, Managing Director, Initiative, U.S.
    • Dina Kaplan , Co-founder, Blip.tv
    • Jack Myers , Media Economist & Investment Advisor
    • Michael Perlis , Partner, Softbank Capital
    • Jim Stengel , President & CEO of The Jim Stengel Company, LLC
    Background The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 5.
    • Stage 2: Quantitative Methodology
    • There were 1,000 surveys conducted among Consumers via an online national panel between August 11 th and 17 th , 2010. The survey length was 20 minutes.
    • Target demographics of respondents were representative of the U.S. Census.
    • Essentially 95% of the U.S. ‘Target Market’ are: adults age 18 to 69 who have broadband or high-speed Internet service and spend more than 1 hour per week on the Internet for personal activities.
    • Qualification criteria for respondents included:
      • Age 18 to 69;
      • Must have high-speed Internet service ( dial-up termination = 4% incidence);
      • Must have broadband Internet access in their home ( terminate for no Internet access in home = 1% incidence ) ;
      • Must spend more than one hour per week on the Internet for personal (non-work) reasons ( terminate for on Internet 1 hour or less per week = 1% incidence );
      • Cannot work for competitive industries (market research, ad / public relations agency, company whose primary business is providing online or Internet service, publishing or media company).
    Methodology The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 6. Section I Executive Summary
  • 7.
    • Broad, Active Market
    • The consumer market for this research is broadly defined as those with broadband access to the Internet who are active online users of content and communication (email and social networking). This market is pervasive -- 95% of those with online access in their home .
      • By inference, the virtual ubiquity of broadband makes the overall content consumption experience far more seamless and enjoyable than in years past .
    • What is Content?
    • “ Content” is not a consumer word. Rather, consumers use many terms in defining what they look for on the Internet – in the industry parlance of “content”. To the consumer, content is “information” or “stuff” or simply the “web pages” they use .
    • Nonetheless content is a dominant part of their lives. Consumers report that over half of their online activity is spent consuming information or content.
    • Broadly, consumers think of content as: News sources (news, sports, finance, health, etc.), Entertainment (news, music, videos, games), and Shopping. Moreover, even Ads, when personally- and contextually-relevant, have merit as “content” of value.
    •  
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 8.
    • Content Consumption is Personal
    • The consumption of online content has evolved to be habitual and routine as well as innately personal and unique .
      • “ What” = Personal: Content consumption is very personal in that it represents the things that specifically meet each individual’s own needs and interests.
      • “ How” = Unique: How do consumers get to content? Some go directly to a site, others via a portal, or search engine, or through links or the growing use of mobile. Each user’s navigational behavior is unique.
      • Habituated: Consumers are fairly habitual in their content consumption. Once established, they navigate and consume based on what is comfortable and satisfying.
    • Thus, content preferences are personal. Each person has needs-based information requirements that are unique, illustrating each consumer’s individuality .
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 9.
    • The “How” of Content Consumption
    • When seeking and finding “news”, “entertainment” and “shopping”, the use of search is less dominant vs. going to a specific site or portal directly.
    • For News & Entertainment : Just over half of the time consumers go directly to a news or entertainment site or use a portal or homepage to get there. To a lesser degree they use search.
    • For Shopping the “how” is different. Half the time they go directly to a shopping site with supporting activity of using search. The use of a “portal or homepage” is minimal.
    • Consumer Hierarchy of Content Attributes
    • There is an important set of core values that span content types. Most important is content that is credible and trustworthy . Consumers routinely reject content sources they feel have duped or manipulated them .
      • The second “tier” of ‘ important ‘ core values relates to content source and authority. This includes content that is: “Recent”, “Relevant”, “Authentic” and “Quality”.
    • Less important for consumers is content that is “first among search results” and “friend recommended”. When seeking out news, in particular, visual appeal plays a lesser role for consumers .
    •  
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 10.
    • Original and Aggregated Content
    • Consumers assign trust to content that is contingent on their experiences with its source -- such as the specific brand carrying it, or the author who generated it. Recommendations play a lesser role in their value system .
    • Those who prefer diversity of content, or who tend to be distrustful of online content, prefer content aggregators, thus increasing the likelihood of getting to something they can trust.
    • Those who say they are willing to pay for content want it to be exclusive: not be available anywhere else (i.e., original content). Furthermore, just under half of online consumers consider well-known authors / bloggers and experts to be influential to their content selections – further reflecting the value of original content .
    • Proponents of original content are often highly passionate about and loyal to these sources of original content.
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 11.
    • Sponsored Content
    • Sponsored content is largely understood by consumers as a means of delivering an advertising message while engaging them with content. While some are skeptical and routinely dismiss it, other consumers believe sponsored content (especially from major brands) to be of higher quality since the sponsoring brand was willing to risk their brand reputation on the association with the content.
    • It was clear from consumers and experts that sponsored content should be directly relevant to the brand with which it is associated as this relevant connection is more likely to increase brand recall and the likelihood of ultimately generating a transaction for the advertiser .
    • Well-known, established brands convey inherent trust. When their content is enhanced with relevance, quality, authenticity, and “recency”, these brands become even more trusted.
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 12.
    • Ads…at Their Best
    • Consumers believe that most of the content they experience online is supported by advertising. With the exception of ads that are invasive, consumers have largely come to accept advertising as a part of online life. When these ads are relevant (highly-targeted and engaging), they become valued to consumers .
      • In addition, ads that stand out with strong visual appeal (e.g., with high-quality photos as in a magazine) are also more acceptable to consumers and more likely to engage them .
    • Ads…at Their Worst
    • Ads that are disruptive and cannot be ignored (like pop-ups, pre-roll ads or takeovers) are the least impactful. Moreover, sites with “too many ads” on a page are considered “cluttered” and “intrusive”.
    •  
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 13.
    • Implications for Content Development
    • Key overarching headlines….
    • Brands Are Important
    • Authors Are Influential
    • Advertising Becoming Accepted as Content
    • Looking more closely at each….
    • 1.) Brands are Important
      • Whether a branded site, branded content, or an “author as a brand”, each matters to consumers and helps determine which content they will trust and therefore what they will consume.
      • Good content brands will identify and surface the best content to save consumers time and frustration.
      • Also, a valued and trusted content brand can enhance the overall consumer experience by providing opportunities for discovery (e.g., providing complementary content or links) to exceed the expectations of consumers.
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 14.
    • Implications for Content Development
    • 1.) Brands are Important (cont’d)
      • Trust and credibility are the hallmarks of the best content brands – an attribute that must be continuously nurtured and vigorously defended in every aspect of the consumer content experience.
      • Great content brands respect the needs of their consumers by being relevant and delivering content in ways that fit their lifestyle (e.g., customizing content for the proliferation of Internet-connected devices that are expanding into every part of consumers’ lives).
    • 2.) Authors Are Influential
      • Well-known authors/blogger and experts carry significant sway in content decisions for nearly half the online population.
      • The best of these authors bring unique and highly valued perspectives, personality and tone, allowing them to generate a strong, loyal following of appreciative consumers.
      • As a source of original content, good authors provide the “uniqueness” and “quality” that together represent the ideal equation for consumers who place high value on original content.
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 15.
    • Implications for Content Development
    • 3.) Advertising Becoming Accepted as Content
      • Advertising is strongly recognized as a form of content to consumers. It is therefore an important element in the overall content equation. However, it must be delivered in an engaging, relevant and visually appealing manner to meet the needs of online consumers.
      • Identifying consumers’ habits and preferences in order to provide relevant advertising must be done respectfully and in a transparent and confidence-inspiring manner – with the primary goal of benefiting the consumer .
      • Sponsored Content in particular must be developed with extreme care – not breaching the trust of those who are skeptical of this form of content. When executed well and in a relevant way, this form of content brings value to both the consumer and the sponsor.
    Section I: Executive Summary The Consumer and Content: Benchmark Study - -
  • 16. Section II Content Note: All charts are based on the total sample of respondents unless otherwise noted.
  • 17. - -
    • Findings on “Content” as Term
    • Content: In the focus groups, consumers had difficulty defining “content.” Even though one in ten in the survey claim to “always” use the term “online content” in conversation, the discussions of the term indicate they don’t really understand it or think of it in such a way (causing some overstating of its use in the quantitative study).
    • Terms consumers said they are more likely to use that match the industry definition of “content” are: “information”, “stuff” or simply the “web pages” they use.
    • “ I think of it as how do you search for stuff? Not, content or information. I don’t look at it that way. It’s just if I think of something, I’m going to get it. And it depends on how I’m getting there.”
    • Consumer Quote
    Section II : Content Original Content Experts on Consumers “ [Content], it is not a consumer word.“ – Jim Stengel President & CEO The Jim Stengel Co., LLC Content Expert "Consumers would say content is any bit of information that they are able to access." – Keith A. Grossman Associate Publisher, WIRED Content Expert
  • 18. - -
    • Impact of Age Dynamics on “Content”
    • Content: From the focus group discussions there were clear differences between Younger and Older consumers in terms of:
      • How they seek and find content;
      • Activities they do online;
      • Devices used to access the Internet (in particular: mobile);
      • Type of sites they frequent;
      • Influence of online reviews;
      • Contributions made online (commenting on articles, uploading photos / video, etc.);
      • Paying for content.
        • Note: “younger” is defined as age 18 to 34. “Older” being age 35 to 69.
    • The quant also reinforces these differences ( see following slide ).
    • “ Most of the time I use my Blackberry for all Internet activities.”
    • “ I do a lot of shopping and spend most of my time looking at things on different websites and Facebook.”
    • Consumer Quotes ( Age 18 to 34 )
    Section II : Content Original Content
  • 19. - - Section II: Content Profile of Younger vs. Older Users Profile of Those “Age 18 to 34”:
    • Age 35+ are:
      • More E-mail centric (41% of their online time is spent emailing)
      • Less social networking (9% of their online time is spent social networking)
      • Spend less time seeking online content (45% spend more than half of their online time)
      • Less use Internet-capable mobile device ( 68% )
      • Less consider themselves “mobile focused” (6%)
      • More seek “news” by going directly to news site or via portal (65% of time seeking news)
      • Less seek online “news” via search engine (17% of time seeking news)
      • Less consider themselves “very tech-savvy” (17%)
      • Less influenced by online reviews (two in ten are very influenced)
      • Less contribute online - comment on articles, upload photos, etc. (60%)
      • Less pay for online content (32%)
    Profile of Those “Age 35+”:
    • Age 18 to 34 are:
      • Less focused on E-mail (25% of their online time is spent emailing)
      • More social networking (23% of their online time is spent social networking)
      • Spend more time seeking online content (58% spend more than half of their online time)
      • More use Internet-capable mobile device ( 85% )
      • More consider themselves “mobile focused” (18%)
      • Less seek “news” by going directly to news site or via portal (56% of time seeking news)
      • More seek online “news” via search engine (24% of time seeking news)
      • More consider themselves “very tech-savvy” (36%)
      • More influenced by online reviews (approx. a third are very influenced)
      • More contribute online - comment on articles, upload photos, etc. (85%)
      • More pay for online content (57%)
  • 20.
    • Seeking Content
    • Seeking content is a fundamental value for consumers – and primarily what they need from the Internet . Consumers spend a little more than half of their online time seeking and consuming information-based ‘content’, specifically:
      • Seeking and getting news and information (sports, finance, politics, health information, etc.);
      • Entertainment (e.g., video, games, music, etc.);
      • Shopping.
      • “ Online I just do research and play.”
      • Consumer Quote
    • The other half of their online time is “communication activity” -- emailing and social networking .
      • Older consumers (age 55 to 69) are more e-mail centric.
      • Younger consumers (age 18 to 34) are more social network-centric.
      • “ When I’m online, I probably do email the most – probably Facebook is second most.”
        • Consumer Quote
    Section II: Content Summary - -
  • 21.
    • How They Typically Find Content Online ( Fulfilling Content Needs )
    • Consumers’ methods or processes in finding content vary on what types of content are being sought and depending on what specific form or source of content they are seeking.
      • When seeking out news or entertainment information, over half of the time they are going directly to a news/entertainment site or via a a portal / homepage. To a lesser degree they will use search.
      • When shopping , half the time they go directly to a shopping site with supporting activity of using search. The use of a “portal” is minimal.
    • So, for these types of content, the use of search is less dominant vs. going to a site or portal directly.
      • “ For me everything is information based. And I’m gonna go to the specific website that I already use and am comfortable with . ”
      • Consumer Quote
    Section II: Content Summary - -
  • 22.
    • Highlights
    • In total, half of respondents spend half or more of their time online seeking and getting online information.
    • A quarter report spending nearly all of their online time (75%+) seeking / getting online information.
    Base: Total Q3d Approximately what percent of your weekly time online do you spend seeking and getting online information – for personal reasons? Section II: Content Percent of Time Seeking & Getting Online Information - - Mean = 52%
  • 23.
    • Highlights
    • Over half of online time is spent seeking / getting information-based content, which includes:
      • Seeking/getting online information (news, sports, finance, politics, etc.)
      • Entertainment
      • Shopping
    • The other half of their time spent online is communication-based: “email” and “social networking”.
    Base: Total Q3e How do you typically spend your time online? Please allocate 100 points across the following ways. The more points you allocate to a choice the more time you spend. The fewer points you allocate the less time you spend. If you do not use a particular way, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100. Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Spend Time Online Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Seeking / getting Info Entertainment (video, games and music) Shopping Email Social Networking Content Activity = 53 Communication Activity = 47
  • 24.
    • Highlights
    • Those who are older (age 55 to 69) are significantly more likely to spend their online time emailing.
    • Younger adults (age 18 to 34) are significantly more likely to be social networking than older consumers.
    Base: Total Q3e How do you typically spend your time online? Please allocate 100 points across the following ways. The more points you allocate to a choice the more time you spend. The fewer points you allocate the less time you spend. If you do not use a particular way, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100. Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Spend Time Online By Age Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Content Activity Communication Activity
  • 25.
    • Highlights
    • Consumers with higher incomes ($100k+) spend more of their online time consuming content.
    • Those with lower incomes (Under $50k) are more likely to spend their online time doing communication activities (email, social networking).
    Base: Total Q3e How do you typically spend your time online? Please allocate 100 points across the following ways. The more points you allocate to a choice the more time you spend. The fewer points you allocate the less time you spend. If you do not use a particular way, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100. Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Spend Time Online By Income Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Content Activity Communication Activity
  • 26.
    • Highlights
    • Similarly, in terms of importance, “content consumption” makes up half of their online activity importance.
    • Communication activities – “email” and “social networking” – make up the other half.
    Section II: Content Importance of Ways Consumers Spend Time Online Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Seeking / getting Info Entertainment (video, games and music) Shopping Email Social Networking Content Activity = 50 Communication Activity = 50 Base: Total Q3f How important are each of the following ways you spend time online? Please allocate 100 points across the following. The more points you allocate the more important it is . The fewer points you allocate the less important it is . Your total must equal 100 .
  • 27. Base: Total Q3f How important are each of the following ways you spend time online? Please allocate 100 points across the following. The more points you allocate the more important it is . The fewer points you allocate the less important it is . Your total must equal 100 . Section II: Content Importance of Ways Consumers Spend Time Online By Age Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - -
    • Highlights
    • Those who are older (age 55 to 69) are significantly more likely to consider “email” important.
    • Those younger (age 18 to 34) are significantly more likely to find “social networking” important.
    Content Activity Communication Activity
  • 28. Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Find News & Entertainment Online Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Portal / Homepage Search Engine Email Alerts Links from Friends Base: Total Q10a How do you typically find news online? This could include news related to business, financial, government, sports, etc. Please allocate 100 points across the following ways of finding news. The more points you allocate to a method the more you would rely on this method to find news. The fewer points you allocate the less you would rely on it to find news. If you do not use a method, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100.
    • Highlights
    • The most common way of finding “news” and “entertainment” online is by:
      • Going directly to a News or Entertainment site or
      • Via a Portal / Homepage.
    • To a lesser degree, they use search.
    Total: 57 News / Entertainment Site Total: 20
  • 29.
    • Highlights
    • Those who are older (age 55 to 69) are more likely to find news online by going “directly to a news site or via a portal”.
    • Those younger (age 18 to 34) are more likely to use “search” and “links from friends” to find news online.
    Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Find News Online By Age Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Direct to Site / Portal Links Base: Total Q10a How do you typically find news online? This could include news related to business, financial, government, sports, etc. Please allocate 100 points across the following ways of finding news. The more points you allocate to a method the more you would rely on this method to find news. The fewer points you allocate the less you would rely on it to find news. If you do not use a method, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100. Search
  • 30. Section II: Content Ways Consumers Typically Shop Online Summary of Means (points based on constant sum exercise) - - Shopping Site Portal / Homepage Search Engine Email Alerts Links from Friends Base: Total Q10c When you are shopping online which methods do you typically use? This could include researching products / services, reading reviews, purchasing music downloads, etc. Please allocate 100 points across the following ways of online shopping. The more points you allocate to a description the more you would rely on this method to shop. The fewer points you allocate the less you would rely on it to shop. If you do not use a method, you may assign it zero points. Your total must equal 100.
    • Highlights
    • The most common way of “shopping” online is by:
      • Going directly to a shopping site. So, “direct to site” is strong for shopping and behaviorally different than News and Entertainment.
      • The use of a “Portal / Homepage” for online shopping is minimal.
    • To a lesser degree search is used.
    Total: 58 Total: 18
  • 31.
    • Use of Search
    • Thus, consumers’ use of search varies slightly with the type of content they are seeking.
    • When seeking and finding “news”, “entertainment” and “shopping”, the use of search is less dominant vs. going to a specific site or portal directly.
    • “ If I want to know more about a movie, I typically go directly to IMDB.com.”
    • Consumer Quote
    • However, when asked to describe themselves in terms of how they seek and find content, the majority (seven in ten) describe themselves as “Search-Focused”:
    • So, there appears to be a contradiction in terms of their perceived use of search and how they report they actually use it.
    Section II: Content Summary - -
  • 32.
    • Self-Perception of How They Seek & Find Content
    • When asked to describe themselves in terms of how they seek and find content, the majority describe themselves as:
      • Search-focused -- primarily use search to organize their activity and then seek and find content;
      • Specific-site focused -- meaning they go directly to specific sites to seek and find content (e.g., ESPN.com for sports, CNN.com for news, People.com for celebrity gossip, etc.).
    • Other “types” are:
    • “ Portal focused ”, three in ten heavily rely on portals such as Yahoo, AOL and MSN for content.
    • “ Links Focused ”, two in ten rely on links either sent by friends (via email, Facebook, etc.) or links found online from other websites.
    • “ For a lot of my stuff I click on email links because I’m looking for that flight to Seattle or I’m looking for that vacation rental in Florida.”
    • Consumer Quote
    • “ Offline Focused ”, two in ten get ideas about where to go online from “offline” sources such as friends, TV shows, or print.
    • “ Mobile focused ”, one in ten use their mobile device (plus app) when finding / seeking content (mostly those age 18 to 34).
    Section II: Content Summary - -
  • 33. Search Focus = primarily use a search engine to get to information and web sites Specific Site Focus = primarily go directly to a specific sites that concentrate on that topic Portal Focus = primarily use a “portal” – (multi-use websites like Yahoo, MSN or AOL) that cover lots of topics Links Focus = tend to rely on links either sent by friends (via email, Facebook, etc.) or links I find online from other websites Offline Focus = tend to get ideas about where to go online from “offline” sources such as friends, TV shows, or print. Mobile User = primarily use my mobile device and if appropriate use a mobile app to find it Base: Total Q11 Generally, how would you describe yourself in terms of how you seek out and find online information or sites? Section II: Content Self-Perception of How Consumers Seek & Find Online Information Top 3 Boxes (in 10-pt. Scale) - -
  • 34.
    • Highlights
    • “ Search-Focused” users and “Specific Site-Focused” users have very similar profiles.
    - - Section II: Content How Consumers Seek & Find Online Information Base: Total Q11 Generally, how would you describe yourself in terms of how you seek out and find online information or sites? Profile of “Search-Focused” Users:
    • Specific Site-Focused Users:
      • Half Male, Half Female
      • Mean age = 44 – 50% are age 45-69 ;
      • Household income (mean = $64,330)
      • Caucasian ( 81% )
      • Time Spent Online ( 48% are online more than 20 hours per week for work/personal reasons ).
      • Time frequenting social networking sites – 45% are on at least once a day ;
      • Employed full-time (46%);
      • Business owners (10%);
      • Married (56%);
      • Kids in household ( 34% );
      • Use the term “online content” (15%)
    Profile of “Specific Site-Focused” Users:
    • Search-Focused Users:
      • Half Male, Half Female
      • Mean age = 45 – 52% are age 45-69 ;
      • Household income (mean = $63,270)
      • Caucasian ( 81% )
      • Time Spent Online ( 46% are online more than 20 hours per week for work/personal reasons ).
      • Time frequenting social networking sites – 47% are on at least once a day ;
      • Employed full-time (41%);
      • Business owners (10%);
      • Married (55%);
      • Kids in household ( 33% );
      • Use the term “online content” (14%)
  • 35.
    • Highlights
    • “ Mobile-Focused” users have a very different profile.
    - - Section II: Content How Consumers Seek & Find Online Information Base: Total Q11 Generally, how would you describe yourself in terms of how you seek out and find online information or sites? Profile of “Mobile-Focused” Users:
    • Mobile-Focused Users are more likely:
      • Male (63%);.
      • Younger ( mean age = 34) – six in ten are age 18 to 34 ;
      • Have higher household income (mean = $72,820)
      • Ethnically diverse ( 13% Hispanic, 13% Asian. 12% Black, 62% Caucasian )
      • Online longer ( six in ten are online more than 20 hours per week for work and personal reasons );.
      • Frequent social networking sites – two-thirds are on at least once a day ;
      • Employed full-time (58%);
      • Business owners (18%);
      • Single (52%);
      • Have kids < age 13 in household ( four in ten );
      • Always use the term “original content ” (42%)
  • 36. - -
    • Search Engine’s Influence on Content Consumption
    • In the focus groups, consumers were observed as they performed familiar navigation exercises (e.g., getting latest news or celebrity gossip, checking out a restaurant, looking up movie info, etc.).
      • Some consumers often typed the name of the website they were going to into a search engine instead of typing the URL into the address bar. This less-direct process presents consumers with additional content options based on what appears on the SERP.
      • There are highly varying levels of sophistication in developing effective search queries – again presenting consumers more content options and opportunities for distraction.
      • More often than not they tended to select content from among the first results appearing on a SERP (including sponsored content) or by clicking on results from well-known or familiar web brands – rarely venturing beyond the first SERP to explore other results.
      • The ads that showed up in navigation exercises did not appear to disrupt or influence content selections. Consumers tended to overlook display ads. The exception was among the few consumers who volunteered that periodically click on appealing ads to explore their content further.
    Section II : Content Seeking and Finding Content “ I put in recipes for shrimp into Google. Or go straight to Food.com or Food Network. It loads way too slow. That’s why I usually do Google and try to pick a website that’s not them.” – Consumer Quote
  • 37. Base: Total Q14b When using a search engine, how would you describe yourself in terms of how you decide which search result to click on? For each of the following statements please use a 10-pt. scale where ‘1’ means this ‘does not describe you at all’ and ‘10’ means it ‘describes you very well’. Section II: Content Behavior When Using a Search Engine Top 3 Boxes (in 10-pt. Scale)
    • Highlights
    • When using a search engine, most (six in ten) will “read the description on each search result to see what is most relevant.”
    • Four in ten tend to “choose the results from familiar sites that come up”.
    • Only 14% report typically choosing the “sponsored search results”.
    - -
  • 38. - - Section III Aggregated & Original Content
  • 39. - -
    • Findings on Content-Related Terms
    • Aggregated Content: The least understood of the tested terms, consumers relied on context clues to guess at its meaning.
      • “ I’m not sure I’ve heard [of aggregated content] but I can imagine it’s a lot of content from disparate sources pulled together into one place.”
    • The idea of aggregated content held appeal, particularly to skeptics and those who appreciate a variety of points of view as they believe varied sources offer freshness and allow them to cross-reference and validate information as facts.
    • Some users of original sites (especially sites that are less-well-known or trusted) accomplish this by comparing information between sites.
      • “ So I want to know what I’m getting. So if it’s a news story or whatever it is, I want to see as many sides of it as possible.”
      • “ I don’t like to read the same article on different news sites. I like to get it at one source and know that it’s accurate and original.”
      • ” I’m looking at sourcing here and I’m trying to be aware of my own bias. So I may go to Huffington Post to see what another perspective is.“
    • Consumer Quotes
    Section III : Aggregated & Original Content Original Content
  • 40.
    • Highlights
    • As heard in the focus groups, most consumers are not really aware of what “online content” is and don’t really understand it -- even though one in ten claim to always use this term.
    • Six in ten report never using the term “original content”.
    • Three-quarters never use the term “aggregated content”.
    Base: Total Q12 When you have conversations about the Internet do you use any of the following terms in your discussions? Please indicate for each if you ‘never use’, ‘sometimes use’ or ‘always use’ the terms. Section III : Aggregated & Original Content Consumer Use of Terms - -
  • 41. - -
    • Findings on Original Content
    • Original Content: Once understood, to consumers “original content” in and of itself does not necessarily imply value but does imply “unique.” When this uniqueness (or exclusivity) is combined with quality it takes on real value. These perceptions of quality are determined by numerous factors such as the content's source (author or brand), freshness, context, etc.
    • “ Quality content is in the eye of the beholder.”
    • Dina Kaplan, Co-founder, Blip.tv Content Expert
    • “ Whether it’s original or aggregated, I don’t think that necessarily ties to quality at all.”
    • David Michel-Davies , Executive Director, IADAS Content Expert
    Section III : Aggregated & Original Content Original Content Consumers on Content Types “ When the Reds play a ball game you can get that story from a lot of different places. There is a fellow that writes for the Dayton Daily News and I always read his. I like his writing style. In a case like that you want his original.” - Consumer Quote Unique + Quality = Valued Original Content Trusted Fresh Relevant Authentic Experts: Original vs. Aggregated Content
  • 42. - -
    • Findings on Original Content (cont.)
    • Few consumers believe that there is much truly original content that is exclusively available from any one source.
    • However, a significant share of online consumers (45%) indicate that content from well-known authors / bloggers and topic experts (all sources of original content) are influential in their choice of content.
    • While there may not be much that is recognized as (high quality) original content online, there is a sizeable audience among whom these “elite authors” have influence and – apparently – provide value.
    • “ Credible is the word – that’s the word that describes (quality content).”
    • “ Secure is another good word (to describe quality content).”
    • “ Brand means author – there’s a connection there.”
    • Consumer Quotes
    Section III : Aggregated & Original Content Original Content
  • 43.
    • Highlights
    • Eight to nine in ten consider the following to be content:
      • Online Advertising;
      • Text / Articles;
      • Videos
      • Photos
      • Music.
    Base: Total Q13 If you came across any of the items below while you were online, would you classify them as “online content”? Please indicate if you consider each item to be “not online content”, “possibly online content” or “definitely online content”. Section III : Aggregated & Original Content What Constitutes Content? - - Other mentions included:  Anything / everything online  News  Blogs  Information  Shopping  Reviews
  • 44. - -
    • Navigation Exercises Revealed More About Content Selection
    • Observing consumers going through routine online navigation exercises revealed that even when they knew exactly where they are headed, they often noticed or were drawn into “other” attention-grabbing content – sometimes in search results but more commonly on destination pages.
    • Content creators can tactically or strategically lure consumers into primary or secondary content by leveraging other content selection influences….
      • Poignant Imagery. Once consumers arrive on a site, large, vivid, emotive photographs or motion-based imagery (such as video or flash – even in advertising) are most often the first things to grab attention even when this is not part of the consumer’s original consumption plans.
      • Clever Headlines. Although trumped by imagery, bold or provocative headlines –– are the next most likely things to grab consumer’s attention, followed by body (or less prominent) copy/text.
      • Audio. In the way that it typically showed up, audio was integral to the central experience of a web page and therefore not observed to be a motivator for drawing consumers into other content. Some consumers described their typical experiences with non-central audio as an annoyance (as when piped into display ads) and unappreciated.
    Section III : Aggregated & Original Content Influences When Choosing / Selecting Online Information
  • 45. Section IV Paying For Content
  • 46.
    • Currently, four in ten pay for some type of online content.
    • This primarily consists of:
      • Music downloads (e.g., iTunes);
      • Online video streaming (e.g., from Netflix)
    • The top qualities that would make online content worth paying for are:
      • Something I use all the time;
      • High quality;
      • Original – can’t find anywhere else;
      • Time-saving.
    • “ (Paid content has to be) original, fresh, new and valuable…and interesting.”
    • David Bell
    • Chairman Emeritus
    • The Interpublic Group Content Expert
    Section IV: Paying For Content Summary - - Consumers on Paying for Content “ [Content worth paying for is] something you can’t live without; something you need.”   “ If you wanted to get information…you used to have to pay for it like a subscription…. Now there are ways you can go about getting it without paying for it.” - Consumer Quotes Experts on Paying For Content
  • 47.
    • Highlights
    • In total, four in ten report paying for some type of online content.
    • A little over a quarter currently pay for music downloads online.
    • 16% pay for online video streaming.
    • One in ten pay for E-books online.
    • Those who are younger (age 18 to 34) are much more likely to pay for content.
    Base: Total Q17a Which of the following do you currently pay for? Section IV: Paying For Content Online Content Consumers Currently Pay For - - Pay For Content By Age: Age 18 to 34 = 57% Age 35 to 54 = 39% Age 55 to 69 = 25%
  • 48.
    • Highlights
    • Top qualities that would make content worth paying for:
      • Something I use all the time;
      • High quality;
      • Original – can’t find anywhere else;
      • Time-saving;
      • Fun
    Base: Total Q17b What makes anything online worth paying for? For each of the following, please use a 10-pt. scale where ‘1’ means it is ‘definitely not worth paying for’ and ‘10’ means it is ‘definitely worth paying for’. Section IV: Paying For Content Qualities That Make Online Content Worth Paying For - - Top 3 Boxes (in 10-pt. Scale) Other mentions included:  New  Only source  Cool  Breaking news
  • 49.
    • Among those willing to pay for online news…
    • The mean amount consumers would pay monthly if the News content were….
    • Something I use all the time $7.15 28%
      • High Quality $7.11 29%
      • Ad-free video $7.03 35%
      • No ads $6.89 30%
      • Original – can’t find elsewhere $6.70 28%
      • Fun $6.66 37%
      • Time-Saving $6.40 31%
    • Highlights
    • Those who are “news-focused” and would consider paying for online content are likely to pay approximately $7 monthly for a subscription-based online news source.
    Base: Those who are News-Focused and Would Consider Paying for Online Content Q18a Generally, how much would you be willing to pay monthly for a “subscription to an online news source” based on each of the following?&quot; Section IV Paying For Content Price Willing To Pay For a “ Subscription to an Online News Source” - - Would Not Pay Anything
  • 50.
    • Highlights
    • Those who are “entertainment-focused” and would consider paying for online content are likely to pay approximately $7 to $8 monthly for subscription-based entertainment information.
    Section IV: Paying For Content Price Willing To Pay For “ Subscription-Based Entertainment Information” Base: Those who are Entertainment-Focused and Would Consider Paying for Online Content Q18b Generally, how much would you be willing to pay monthly for “subscription-based entertainment information” based on each of the following?&quot; Would Not Pay Anything
    • Among those willing to pay for online entertainment information…
    • The mean amount consumers would pay monthly if the entertainment content were….
    • Something I use all the time $8.26 29%
      • Original – can’t find elsewhere $7.83 30%
      • High Quality $7.76 27%
      • Fun $7.66 31%
      • Time-Saving $7.45 35%
      • Ad-free video $7.29 32%
      • No ads $7.16 28%
  • 51. Section V Maximum Difference Assessment: Content Hierarchy
  • 52.
    • Maximum Difference Decision Judgment Analysis
    • This analytic approach evaluates “true relative importance ” of attributes – and develops assessment in term of weight and scale of attributes.
    • Maximum Difference is a dynamic measurement technique which employs an experimental design or conjoint-like design framework. Thus, Maximum Difference is based on an experimental design foundation – and allows us to evaluate individual scaled ratings of all items measured.
    • For this research, a set of descriptors of information / content were measured via a Maximum Difference assessment.
    • The Maximum Difference task is an easy activity for the respondent. For the specified descriptors in each task, we ask the respondent to indicate which feature is “Most” important when seeking information online and which is “Least” important – for three settings: when seeking “news”, “entertainment information” and when “shopping”.
    • The measures of “most” and “least” allow us to actually scale the relative impact of the features. This scaling process provides a clear discrimination in the importance of the individual features. These scale values were standardized to fit a scale of “0 to 10”.
    • The relative importance of these content features are shown in “tiers”. Each tier is significantly more important than the other.
    Section V: Maximum Difference Assessment: Content Hierarchy Summary - -
  • 53.
    • In all three settings (“news”, “entertainment” and “shopping”), the most important content feature is “from a credible and trusted source”.
    • Interestingly, w hen seeking “News” and “Entertainment” information, the findings are very similar.
      • For both news and entertainment, “Credible and Trusted Source” is of primary importance. However, when seeking “news” they are a lot more discriminating in terms of importance (stronger scaled ratings).
    • “ It comes down to trust and trusting that content, and that’s what makes it quality. (Trust) is based on who wrote it, the author, the person or people behind that, the venue it was published at, the reputation of that venue. The author of it certainly has a big impact.”
    • David Michel-Davies Executive Director, IADAS Content Expert
    • “ Quality content is trustworthy content – it has to add something to the consumer’s life. It has to be something that is in their mind genuine and true and factually correct or factually incorrect if that’s what they’re seeking out.”
    • Michael Hayes EVP, Managing Director
    • Initiative, U.S.
    • Content Expert
    Section V: Maximum Difference Assessment: Content Hierarchy Summary - -
  • 54.
    • Other dominant factors
      • After “Trusted/Credible” the next most important factors describing valued content are: “Recent”, “Relevant”, “ Authentic” and “Quality”.
    • “ Quality content should be useful, authentic, and factual .”
    • Michael Hayes EVP, Managing Director, Initiative, U.S. Content Expert
      • “ Pictures and headlines in the search context I think are very important. Brand I think is moderately interesting for them. Authorship I don’t think is highly important. Original content: they really don’t care as long as it’s interesting.”
      • Jim Stengel
      • President & CEO of The Jim Stengel Co., LLC
      • Content Expert
      • [Recency is important when shopping.] “When I search Amazon, and I’m looking for reviews, I don’t want reviews on a product from three years ago. I need what’s going on with the product within this year.”
      • Consumer Quote
    • The lesser factors (in all three settings) are related to “visual appeal”, “first among search results” and content that “friends recommend”.
    Section V: Maximum Difference Assessment: Content Hierarchy Summary - -
  • 55.
    • Highlights
    • When seeking online information and content for “news”, most important is content that is:
      • From a credible and trusted source;
      • Recent;
      • Relevant;
      • Authentic;
      • Quality
    Base: Total Below are several descriptions of online information and content for news. Thinking about your online preferences for news, check the ONE that is MOST important to you when seeking such information online, and the ONE that is LEAST important to you when seeking such information online. Section V: Max Diff Assessment Importance When Seeking “News” Online - - 3 rd Tier 2 nd Tier 1 st Tier 4th Tier
  • 56. Base: Total Below are different ways of describing online information when seeking out anything entertainment-related. This could include celebrity gossip, information on music, movies or TV shows, watching videos or listening to music. Thinking about your online preferences for entertainment, check the ONE that is MOST important to you when seeking such information online, and the ONE that is LEAST important to you when seeking such information online. Section V: Max Diff Assessment Importance When Seeking “Entertainment” Info. Online - -
    • Highlights
    • When seeking online information and content for “entertainment”, most important is content that is:
      • From a credible and trusted source;
      • Relevant;
      • Recent;
      • Quality;
      • Authentic
    3 rd Tier 2 nd Tier 1 st Tier 4th Tier
  • 57. Base: Total Below are several ways of describing online information / content when shopping. Thinking about your online preferences for shopping, check the ONE that is MOST important to you when seeking such information online, and the ONE that is LEAST important to you when seeking such information online. Section V: Max Diff Assessment Importance When Seeking “Shopping” Online - -
    • Highlights
    • When shopping online the process is slightly different.
      • “ Quality” and “Known established brand” are more important (than for news and entertainment).
    3 rd Tier 2 nd Tier 1 st Tier 4th Tier
  • 58. - - Section VI Advertising
  • 59. - -
    • Acceptance & Appeal of Ad Formats
    • Consumers recognize and accept that online advertising is simply a part of the online experience. The most acceptable are the least disruptive ones versus those that cannot be ignored (like pop-ups, pre-roll ads or takeovers).
    • The most acceptable – and likely most effective – are those that are directly relevant (targeted to their likes) and visually appealing imagery (i.e., ads with photos like a magazine).
      • Consumers want “fewer ads” on a page so they are less intrusive (and page is less cluttered).
    • &quot;(I don't mind ads) that show me new ways I can use things - like something I might have at my house or something I buy or that I’ve bought in the past. And it’s going to tell me something else that I can use for the better.“
    • “ Ads can be useful depending on adaptability.  Everybody has favorites, what they type into their home page, what their favorites are so they can go straight to those sites. If you could type in what your favorite topics are into an advertising registered site and it’s only going to display things that apply to the list that you created that you can change or alter -- then it will filter out what you don’t want anymore, keep bringing in the stuff that you’re interested in, and it will be less intrusive.”
    • Consumer Quotes
    Section VI : Advertising Ad Formats Targeted Ads “ I think it’s going to move to be more intuitive with people’s habits (and) be highly mobile. The winners are going to be those who respect privacy, who are in touch on an individual basis on what people do, what they love and like to do. And provide them ideas.&quot; — Jim Stengel President & CEO Jim Stengel Co., LLC Content Expert On Clicking a News Video… “… and the first thing is a 15-second commercial for Ford. So that is aggravating. It’s something I didn’t want. I didn’t need it!” – Consumer Quote
  • 60. - -
    • Sponsored Content – A Form of Advertising
    • Consumers understand what sponsored content is, but are ambivalent about its impact, effectiveness and appeal. Nonetheless, it has positive implications for content purveyors.
    • On the positive side, consumers made the observation in focus groups that content sponsored by a major brand is likely to be of high quality given the sponsoring brand’s willingness to be associated with it.
      • “ A lot of advertisers will spend a very high premium to reach a very targeted, engaged, responsive audience. Others are trying to sell something that everyone in the world could buy…they’re looking for region, audience and price frankly.”
    • David Michel-Davies Executive Director, IADAS Content Expert
      • “ I would think if it was brought to you by Kraft or something then you know maybe the content is probably a little bit more reliable. Why would Kraft put their name on this to sponsor it if it wasn’t something that was going to be reliable? It would hurt their image.”
      • Consumer Quote
    Section VI : Advertising Sponsored Content The Brand / Content Marriage &quot;Brand marketers are very interested in the relationship between the advertising and the relevance of the content. Context is incredibly important .&quot; — Michael Hayes EVP, Managing Director Initiative, U.S. Content Expert What Consumers Want “ Consumers want advertisers to provide content that adds value, provides value in several forms and provides new and important information. And does that in a way that surprises and delights and even in a way that can entertain.&quot; — Jim Stengel President & CEO Jim Stengel Co., LLC Content Expert
  • 61. - -
    • Sponsored Content (cont’d)
    • Sometimes though sponsored content raised a warning flag, as some suspected it might simply be an ad dressed in content, with the primary objective of trying to sell them something.
    • Echoing what content experts said, consumers mentioned that sponsored content should be directly relevant to the brand with which it is associated.
      • It seems reasonable that a relevant connection between content and sponsoring brand is more likely to increase brand recall and the likelihood of ultimately generating a transaction for the advertiser.
    Section VI : Advertising Sponsored Content Experts & Consumers Agree…. Sponsored content must be relevant to the sponsoring brand. One expert-cited example was that Kraft-sponsored content definitely needs to be about food Kraft offers.
  • 62. Base: Total Q16b How acceptable are the following types of online advertising? Please indicate whether each type is “not at all acceptable”, “not very acceptable”, “somewhat acceptable” or “very acceptable”. Section VI: Advertising Acceptability of Online Advertising (1 of 2) Very / Somewhat Acceptable
    • Highlights
    • The online ads that are most acceptable to them are:
      • Ads targeted to your likes;
      • Ads with photos (like in a magazine);
      • Sponsored ads in search results.
    • Consumers are clearly more open to minimally disruptive ads – ones that are consumable on their own terms – versus those that cannot be easily ignored.
    - -
  • 63. Base: Total Q16b How acceptable are the following types of online advertising? Please indicate whether each type is “not at all acceptable”, “not very acceptable”, “somewhat acceptable” or “very acceptable”. Section VI: Advertising Acceptability of Online Advertising (2 of 2) Very / Somewhat Acceptable - -
    • Highlights
    • The online ads that are least acceptable to them are:
      • Take over ads;
      • Pop-up ads;
      • In video ads
  • 64. Section VII Influences on Content
  • 65.
    • Influence of Online Reviews
    • Consumers are similarly influenced by the following types of online reviews. About a quarter find these reviews “very” influential:
      • Online reviews from consumers they know (e.g., on Facebook).
      • Online reviews from experts – perceived as “unbiased”;
      • Online reviews from consumers they don’t know.
    • About two in ten report using these reviews “very” frequently.
      • “ I read reviews of products and Consumer Reports. In my opinion that’s an expert recommendation. I like those because they’re unbiased.”
            • Consumer Quote
    • Online Contributions
    • Two-thirds of consumers report contributing to online sites in some way.
      • About half have uploaded a photo to an online site;
      • A third have commented on articles;
      • A quarter have written an online review.
    • Younger consumers (age 18 to 34) are significantly more likely to have contributed online vs. Older consumers (age 55 to 64).
    Section VII: Influences On Content Summary - -
  • 66.
    • Highlights
    • Three in ten find “ Online reviews from consumers they know” (e.g., on Facebook) very influential when looking for information before making a purchase.
    • About a quarter find “Online reviews from experts” and “Online reviews from consumers they don’t know” very influential.
    Base: Total Q6a How much influence do the following have when you are looking for more information before you make a purchase? Section VII: Influences On Content Influence of Online Reviews - - Very Influential
  • 67.
    • Highlights
    • Younger users (age 18 to 34) are significantly more likely to be influenced by the three different types of reviews shown.
    Base: Total Q6a How much influence do the following have when you are looking for more information before you make a purchase? Section VII: Influences On Content Influence of Online Reviews By Age - - Very Influential
  • 68.
    • Highlights
    • Approximately two in ten use these types of reviews “very” frequently.
    Base: Total Q6b How frequently do you use the following when you are looking for more information before you make a purchase? Section VII: Influences On Content Frequency of Using Online Reviews - - Use Very Frequently
  • 69.
    • Highlights
    • Two-thirds report contributing to online sites.
    • About half have uploaded photos to an online site.
    • A third have commented on articles.
    • A quarter have written an online review.
    Base: Total Q7 Please indicate if you do any of the following? Section VII: Influences On Content Online Contributions - - 32% do not contribute to online sites
  • 70.
    • Highlights
    • There are significant differences by age in terms of online contributions.
    • Over eight in ten of younger consumers age 18 to 34 contribute online vs. about half of those age 55 to 69.
    • Younger consumers are substantially more likely to upload photos vs. older consumers.
    Base: Total Q7 Please indicate if you do any of the following? Section VII: Influences On Content Online Contributions By Age - - Contribute: Age 18 to 34 = 85% Age 35 to 54 = 67% Age 55 to 69 = 53%
  • 71. Base: Total Q14a How influential are the following when choosing or selecting online information? For each of the following, please use a 10-pt. scale where ‘1’ means it is ‘not at all influential’ and ‘10’ means it is ‘very influential’. Section VII: Influences on Content Influences When Choosing / Selecting Online Information Top 3 Boxes (in 10-pt. Scale)
    • Highlights
    • A little less than half consider a “Well known brand website” influential when choosing / selecting online information.
    • Approximately a third find “Articles by a topic area expert” and “Articles by well –known journalists/authors” influential.
    • About two in ten find “well known bloggers” influential.
    - -
  • 72. Section VIII Use of Websites
  • 73.
    • Among consumers, there is a proliferation of many different types of websites used.
    • The sites most frequently used (once a day or more) are:
      • Social Networking sites;
      • News sites;
      • Local news sites;
      • Online game sites;
      • Sports sites.
    • The sites least frequently used (once a day or more) are:
      • Travel sites;
      • Beauty / style sites;
      • Photo sharing sites;
      • Parenting sites;
      • Health / Medical sites
    • Of the specific websites shown, Google is the most used (eight in ten frequently or sometimes use) followed by Yahoo (two-thirds use).
    • Two in ten report using AOL frequently or sometimes. Slightly less than two-thirds never use AOL.
    Section VIII: Use of Websites Summary - -
  • 74.
    • Highlights
    • The sites they most frequently use are:
      • Social Networking sites;
      • News sites;
      • Local news sites;
      • Online games;
      • Sports sites.
    Base: Total Q5 Please indicate how often you use the following types of sites? Section VIII: Use of Websites Frequency of Using Types of Websites (1 of 2) - - Note: Listed in order of frequency of use
  • 75.
    • Highlights
    • Of the types of sites shown, the ones that are not as frequently used are:
      • Travel sites;
      • Beauty / style sites;
      • Photo sharing sites;
      • Parenting sites;
      • Health / Medical sites.
    Base: Total Q5 Please indicate how often you use the following types of sites? Section VIII: Use of Websites Frequency of Using Types of Websites (2 of 2) - - Note: Listed in order of frequency of use
  • 76. Section IX Profiling
  • 77.
    • Highlights
    • In total, nearly half are online 20+ hours per week for both work and personal reasons.
    • A little over a quarter are online 20+ hours per week just for personal reasons.
    Base: Total Q3b Approximately how much time do you spend online weekly in total – for both personal and work-related reasons? Q3c. Approximately how much time do you spend online weekly just for personal reasons ? Section IX: Profiling Weekly Amount of Time Online - -
  • 78.
    • Highlights
    • Two-thirds report using a notebook / laptop.
    • A third have a Smart Phone.
    • A quarter use a Web-Connected Music Device.
    Base: Total Q8 Which, if any, of the following Internet-capable mobile devices do you currently use? Section IX: Profiling Use of Internet-Capable Mobile Devices - -
  • 79. Section IX: Profiling Frequency of Using Mobile Devices - -
    • Highlights
    • “ Email” and “Accessing the web” are the primary daily activities on their mobile device.
    • A little over four in ten “read news articles/stories” and “social network” on a daily basis.
    • Less than two in ten are using “mobile apps” on a daily basis. Half of mobile users never use mobile apps.
    Base: Those Who Use Internet Capable Mobile Devices (n=739) Q9 Generally, how frequently do you use any internet-capable device (or devices) for the following activities?
  • 80.
    • Highlights
    • iPad / Tablet PC users use their device significantly more frequently for:
      • Accessing local info.
      • Mobile apps;
      • E-Books;
      • Downloading music
    Base: Those Who Use Internet Capable Mobile Devices (n=739) Q9a Generally, how frequently do you use any internet-capable device (or devices) for the following activities? Section IX: Profiling Frequency of Using Mobile Devices By Type of Device - - Use Daily / Several Times a Day Significant Differences Circled
  • 81.
    • Highlights
    • Nearly a quarter of respondents consider themselves “very tech-savvy”, defined as:
      • Keeping up with latest technology trends and you access the Internet using different equipment / devices
    • Most (a little over half) consider themselves “somewhat tech-savvy”.
    Base: Total Q3g How “tech-savvy” would you consider yourself in terms of online use? Section IX: Profiling Tech-Savvy - -
  • 82. - - Section IX: Profiling Demographic Profile (1 of 2)
  • 83. - - Section IX: Profiling Demographic Profile (2 of 2)