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Steelcase 360-issue63
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Steelcase 360-issue63

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Executives everywhere are being asked to deliver higher performance from every company asset. Yet they often overlook an asset that’s both highly leverageable and pivotal to the organization’s …

Executives everywhere are being asked to deliver higher performance from every company asset. Yet they often overlook an asset that’s both highly leverageable and pivotal to the organization’s success: the office.

Like all executives around the world, Steelcase president Jim Keane is always looking for ways to gain a competitive advantage, especially in today’s tough economic climate. And he knows first-hand what others may not recognize yet – the power of real estate to help organizations create, innovate and drive growth.

This insight has been pivotal in Steelcase’s ability to face today’s business challenges: complexity, global competition for customers and talent, cost pressures and the driving need to innovate. With pressures like these, the workplace is an opportunity waiting to be discovered by most businesses today.

Keane says many executives admit that their offices haven’t kept up with the sweeping changes in business. “They know that innovation requires a more agile organization and a more collaborative workforce, and a workplace that encourages both,” he says.

When designed and equipped to meet the challenges of the new, interconnected world, the workplace can help shape the kinds of employees that leaders want most: creative and highly engaged workers, who can collaborate with teammates anywhere in the world, iterate work easily and make quicker decisions.

To meet the challenge of optimizing its own workplaces for competitive advantage and to leverage opportunities created by an interconnected world, Steelcase recently completed a series of strategic real estate projects. Each sets new standards for what the workplace can be – and, more important, what it can accomplish: a better place for people to work that enhances collaboration and innovation, attracts and engages workers, strengthens the organization’s brand and culture – and optimizes the company’s real estate investment.

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  • 1. Even the alternativeshave alternativesNot just third places: now thereare ‘fourth’ places, coworkingspaces and more.Issue 63Exploring workplaceresearch, insightsand trends360.steelcase.comSustainability SpotlightBusiness and environmentalgoals sync up beautifullyat Vertical Screen.Small is beautifulA new study reveals whatevery company can learnfrom the little guys.WHY CEOS AREPAYING ATTENTION
  • 2. On the priority list for senior executives everywhere: maximize assets, cut costs, competein the new economy, boost innovation, build the brand. Meanwhile, topping the list ofmost-overlooked yet waiting-to-be-leveraged assets: the office. The solution is Steelcase’sconcept for the “next” office: an Interconnected Workplace. It does more in less space,whether it’s a building, a campus or offices separated by thousands of miles. This isn’t justa new look, it’s rethinking the office for the new economy, today and tomorrow.about this issue40% of workers come to theoffice for access to the tools& technology they need.Mobile workers spend 60%of their time at the office.72% of workers say theoffice is the best place tointeract with colleagues.
  • 3. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 3360 Magazine is published by Steelcase Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright 2012. Material in this publication may not be reproducedin any form unless you really want to help people love how they work – just ask us first, okay?The next officeExecutives are asked to deliver higher performancefrom every company asset. Yet they often overlookan asset that’s both highly leverageable and pivotalto the organization’s success: the office.6 Madrid getsinterconnected A new WorkLifespace demonstrateshow to create aninterconnectedworkplace.42 Distant colleagues– right here! How a distributedteam uses newtechnology tokeep everyonein the room.64 Even thealternatives havealternatives Not just thirdspaces: now thereare ‘fourth’ places,coworking spacesand more.79 A whole newlearning curve This new columnexplores ideason planning anddesigning 21stcentury learningspaces.Join the conversationConnect with Steelcasevia social media and letus know what you’rethinking. Or email usat 360magazine@steelcase.comSteelcase 360 for iPad on theiTunes App Store: itunes.apple.comDownload Steelcase 360 and enjoyit on your iPad today.Departments4 Perspectives 10 Trends 360 44 Lessons Learned 82 Design Apps 86 Atoms BitsContents12Sustainability SpotlightTony D’Orazio created a LEEDPlatinum certified gem of a workplacethat’s good for the environment andhis business, too.Small is beautifulA new study revealswhat every companycan learn from thelittle guys.6048Exploring workplaceresearch, insightsand trends360.steelcase.com360 on the ipad
  • 4. 4 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comMeet some of the people who contributed informationand ideas to this issue.perspectivesperspectivesCherie Johnson Barbara GoodspeedThe editor of a major design publication had just toured the newWorkCafé at Steelcase’s Global Headquarters. “You know whatthis is? The culmination of what Steelcase has been talking aboutfor the last few years: the blurring of professional and personallives. New products. New ways of working. Technology integration.Living your brand. Now I understand what you’re talking about.”Music to the ears of Johnson and Goodspeed, designers whoreclaimed a corporate cafeteria to create the multifunctional dining/meeting/working/socializing WorkCafé. Goodspeed is a seniorinterior designer. Johnson is design manager in the company’sNorth American industrial design studio.Keane has observed firsthand how business has grown increasinglyinterconnected, mobile, global and complex. He’s president of theSteelcase Group, which includes Steelcase, Turnstone, PolyVision andDetails brands.“We know business today is more challenging and business leaders arealways looking for ways to gain a competitive advantage. Yet we oftenoverlook how real estate can be used as a lever to help organizationsinnovate and drive growth. Space shapes behavior, so if you want peopleto share information, collaborate better and innovate more, you have toJim Keaneinvest in the kinds of spaces that help them do that. It is possibleto leverage real estate and better utilize it by providing workerswith choice and control – these are the new status symbols forknowledge workers.”Based on these insights Steelcase prototyped two newenvironments (pg. 12) at their Global Headquarters building thatgive workers more of what they need: stronger connections withtheir colleagues, better ways to collaborate, and shared accessto technology and tools.
  • 5. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 5perspectivesJoey Shimoda Susan Chang, Shimoda Design Group“I don’t think any corporation in the U.S. has an entry like this,”says Joey Shimoda of the dramatic entrance into the new WorkCafé(pg. 1). His architecture firm, Shimoda Design Group, has worked formany innovative companies: Rolex, Harwood International, Mikimoto,Malin and Goetz, MTV Networks. He credits his associate partner,Susan Chang, for hatching the idea of “blowing out the space to thesecond floor for a big entrance and to tie it in with the rest of the building.”The Los Angeles-based architect says the WorkCafé architecturalconcepts “came from thinking about how our personal and professionallives have meshed. This environment blends spaces for both.”Shimoda has also designed Steelcase WorkLife spaces in Chicago,Illinois, and Santa Monica, California.Melanie RedmanThe senior design researcherwith Steelcase’s WorkSpaceFutures Explorations groupco-led the in-depth study ofsmall companies (pg. 48) withSudhakar Lahade (pictured right).She also has conducted extensiveresearch in the healthcareindustry for Nurture, the Steelcasehealthcare brand, work which ledto an innovative line of infusiontreatment furniture. She’s alsostudied workplace issues rangingfrom collaboration to Gen Yworkers in Asia.Sudhakar LahadeFor more than 15 years, Lahade has worked to discover the hiddenneeds of users in North America, Asia and Europe as a design researcherfor Steelcase. Now manager of growth initiatives for the company,he has been studying the emergence of coworking spaces around theworld (pg. 64). “As businesses become more global and the world moreinterconnected, “one size fits all” workplaces won’t do. “Understandingthe differences between cultures is more important than ever.”
  • 6. Reshaping The Collaborative Experiencemedia:scape boosts collaboration and helpsteams excel. Scan the code to learn more,or visit steelcase.com/mediascape.media:scape™with HD Videoconferencing
  • 7. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 7MADRID: READY FOR ANINTERCONNECTED WORLDun ensayo fotográfico WorkLife Madrid was recently renovated to demonstrate how the workplace can helporganizations thrive in our accelerated, interconnected world. The space reflects new insights,ideas and solutions that address the diverse ways people are working today and demonstrateshow the workplace needs to be designed to support them.The Madrid WorkLife space opened on October 20 and joins 30 other locations around theworld. The opening night event was attended by nearly 800 guests, including Esperanza Aguirre,the president of Madrid (shown top right, third from left).
  • 8. 8 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.commedia:scape®Team Theater™ boosts thecollaborative experience by creating dynamicspaces that help local and distributed teamsstay connected.The new 1,800m2(19,000ft2) facilityshowcases a variety of solutions designedto support the ways people work in aninterconnected world.WorkLife Madrid gives guestsinsight into how to createan interconnected workplacethat supports the ways peoplework today.
  • 9. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 9Benching solutions like FrameOne™ adaptto meet individual needs and workstyles.This classroom designed for active learningis created using node™ seating within aLearnLab™ environment design.An interconnected workplace provides a palette of place –a diverse range of settings, organized into interrelated zones;a palette of posture – a variety of options for people to sit,stand or move throughout their day; and choice and controlover how and where they work.
  • 10. trends360trends 360At last countTalk about virtual connections: Around the world,247 billion emails are sent daily, according toRadicati Group.Data in the world is doubling every 18 months, andby 2013 most computing experiences in the worldwill go through a smart device, says USA Today.Taking measure of an interconnected world.Phone etiquettegoes retro?In the beginning, phones were sold only for businesspurposes. Phone companies tried to stop peoplefrom using telephones for social interactions forabout 30 years because it was considered improper,according to Claude S. Fischer, author of two bookson the history of the phone.Today, many people still consider phone calls rude andintrusive, even at work. Increasingly, business-relatedphone calls are scheduled in advance.10 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com247,000,000,000
  • 11. trends360Waiting for the bell to ringDo you remember as a child at school when you waited for thebell to ring to signal “time to go home” or “time to go play”?Unfortunately, more than two-thirds of workers around the worldhave the same feeling, according to Gallup researchers in theirrecent book titled Wellbeing. These disengaged workers arejust waiting to leave, while workers who are highly engaged arehappier throughout the work day and not ready to rush out thedoor. Not only are disengaged workers not as productive, they’relikely to cost an organization more because of the physical andmental health issues associated with stress.Mobile workforce growingMore than one-third of the global workforce willbe mobile by 2013. The U.S. and Japan haveby far the highest percentage of mobile workers(75 percent and 74 percent, respectively),followed by Western Europe (50 percent), AsiaPacific (37 percent), and the rest of the worldat 15 percent.Global reachFor multinationals, globalintegration can’t happen rapidlyenough. Gross domestic growthis still expanding in China, India,Russia, Brazil and other emergingmarkets. The 1 billion customersof yesterday’s global businesseshave been joined by 4 billionmore, according to strategy-business.com, and 75 percentof them need the infrastructure,products and services that globalcompanies can provide.Together the following 20countries now house 70 percentof the world’s populationand generate 80 percentof its income:ê Developed: Australia, Canada,France, Germany, Italy, Japan,the Netherlands, Spain,the United Kingdom,the United Statesê Emerging: Brazil, China, India,Indonesia, Mexico, Russia,South Africa, South Korea,Thailand, Turkey360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 114 BILLIONMORECUSTOMERSÛof workersaround the worldare disengaged
  • 12. 12 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com89% of workers say it’s important forthe workplace to attract + engage97% of workers want access to toolsand technology; 98% want accessto people; and 99% want access toinformation.
  • 13. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 1360% of CEOs rank creativity as themost important leadership skill.WHY CEOS AREPAYING ATTENTIONExecutives everywhere are being asked to deliver higher performancefrom every company asset. Yet they often overlook an asset that’s bothhighly leverageable and pivotal to the organization’s success: the office.
  • 14. 14 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comThis insight has been pivotal in Steelcase’sability to face today’s business challenges:complexity, global competition for customersand talent, cost pressures and the drivingneed to innovate. With pressures like these,the workplace is an opportunity waiting tobe discovered by most businesses today.Keane says many executives admit that theiroffices haven’t kept up with the sweepingchanges in business. “They know thatinnovation requires a more agile organizationand a more collaborative workforce, and aworkplace that encourages both,” he says.When designed and equipped to meet thechallenges of the new, interconnected world,the workplace can help shape the kindsof employees that leaders want most:creative and highly engaged workers, whocan collaborate with teammates anywherein the world, iterate work easily and makequicker decisions.To meet the challenge of optimizing its ownworkplaces for competitive advantage andto leverage opportunities created by aninterconnected world, Steelcase recentlycompleted a series of strategic real estateprojects. Each sets new standards for whatthe workplace can be – and, more important,what it can accomplish: a better place forpeople to work that enhances collaborationand innovation, attracts and engages workers,strengthens the organization’s brand andculture – and optimizes the company’s realestate investment.Drawing insights from its extensive researchand behavioral prototypes – spaces where thecompany tests new theories on itself in realwork environments – Steelcase reinventedspaces at its global headquarters in GrandRapids, Michigan, and at its Europeanhub in Strasbourg, France, to deliver morecollaboration, greater employee satisfactionand more agility for the future, while alsoreducing the amount of real estate neededto support its workforce.Like all executives around the world, Steelcase president Jim Keane is alwayslooking for ways to gain a competitive advantage, especially in today’s tougheconomic climate. And he knows first-hand what others may not recognize yet –the power of real estate to help organizations create, innovate and drive growth.
  • 15. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 15Ó New work environment, Steelcase GlobalHeadquarters, WorkCafé, Collaboration ZoneQuality of work environment isthe second most important factordetermining job satisfaction.Choice and control is the new statussymbol – workers want freedom tochoose where and how they work.
  • 16. 16 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comAt the global headquarters campus, a wingthat formerly housed just one department isnow home to three – Finance, Procurementand Quality. Another redo project, theWorkCafé, creates an on-site third place byreclaiming traditional cafeteria space andintegrating areas designed for collaborativeand individual work, creating the best of bothworlds: a coffee shop vibe with the functionalityof a well-planned office.In Strasbourg, a redesigned environment nowsupports 340 mobile, nomadic and residentusers in a varied range of worksettingsdesigned to encourage communicationand collaboration.“We’re always looking ahead to see whatthe next evolution of space needs to be andwe always start by testing our concepts andideas on ourselves,” says Keane. “These newspatial concepts will work for any industryand location, and will contribute measurablyto a company’s business results.”NEW ECONOMY, NEW DEMANDS, NEW OFFICEBusiness today is more challenging, tasksmore varied. People move constantly fromfocused individual work to one-on-onemeetings, project sessions to impromptucollaborations, a series of planned andunplanned interactions throughout the day,and 5 o’clock is no longer day’s end for mostworkers with colleagues spread across timeÓ New WorkCafé space at Steelcase’s Global Headquarters“ This is the kind of office a company needsif you want it to be a competitive asset.” Dave Sylvester Steelcase CFOLeaders spend 43% of their timemeeting with small groups, only 9%with groups of 12 or more.The average worker visits40 websites a day.43%09%
  • 17. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 17zones and countries. A recent IBM studyof human resource executives found that80 percent of organizations want workersto collaborate more. Given the increasinglydistributed and mobile workforce, however,they aren’t quite sure how to do it: 78 percentof executives want their organizations to bebetter at it.Meanwhile, offices in every organization standempty for hours each day simply becausebusiness has changed while offices havestagnated. Running a successful businessrequires teamwork and frequent collaboration,but rare is the office that can ably host even atwo-person meeting. Technology and tools areoften hard to access and operate. Teams areneeded to tackle most business problems, yetworkers search in vain for meeting rooms anddedicated project space.“Space influences behavior, so if you wantpeople to share information, collaboratebetter and innovate more, you have to investin the kinds of spaces that help them do that,”says Keane.Organizations have tried to offer choices.A recent study of businesses throughoutNorth America and Europe by Steelcase andCoreNet Global shows that 86 percent ofcompanies offer alternative work strategiessuch as home offices, hotelling and mobilework. The rationale is that technologyis mobile, information can be accessedanywhere, and alternative work strategiescan help support work-life balance.Yet few workers are rushing to set up shopoff-site. Nearly half of the companies reportedthat 10 percent or less of their employeesregularly work remotely. In that same study,72 percent of workers say the office is the bestplace to interact with colleagues. It’s also theplace to access tools and technology.Besides the need to choose how andwhere you work, people need a sense ofparticipation in the collective enterprise,as well as a connection to the organization’sculture. The best place to meet all of theseneeds is the office.Can choose to work at home butchooses to work here – it’s the bestplace to connect with people.
  • 18. 18 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comNEW WAYS OF WORKINGBut not just any office. Rather, an entirelynew approach to it, like the office LaurenRenner uses.A full-time employee in the Finance departmentat Steelcase, Renner doesn’t have an assigneddesk or workspace. She commands fewof the traditional trappings associated withbeing a financial analyst for a global company.No office with a nameplate outside the door,no shelf of family photos and memorabilia,not even her own file cabinet.Instead, each day she chooses one of manyshared desks in the open, daylight-filledFinance department, and selects the mostappropriate individual and group spacesduring the day as her work changes. She andher colleagues, about 75 total, are typical oftoday’s knowledge workers: highly connected,mobile, full-time workers doing businessin a world that itself is global and mobile,and more unpredictable than ever. Havingthe right workspace and tools at hand is farmore valuable to them than having anassigned desk.These Finance workers are like any otherknowledge workers, switching between workmodes throughout the day, moving fromfocused work to collaboration with coworkers,spending time in meetings, learning,networking, communicating.“People are always surprised when theyvisit our workspace,” says Dave Sylvester,Steelcase’s chief financial officer. “They ask,‘Where are the enclosed offices? Why isn’teveryone in heads-down work? This is so...open. People are working in groups, movingaround. Is this really Finance?’”90% of employees say a great viewis important – working in that greatview is even better.Ó Outdoor Terrace, WorkCafé
  • 19. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 19With three departments housed in the newspace, cross-functional collaboration iseasier than ever. Another big plus: The threedepartments now occupy a bit more than halfthe amount of real estate each used previously.Floor space per person decreased from 191 to154 square feet. Desk-sharing ratios went fromone desk for every person to one desk for 1.4to 1.9 people, depending on the group. Post-occupancy surveys will address the qualitativefactors after a settling in period, but recentanecdotal evidence and worker feedback hasbeen overwhelmingly positive.“Everyone now has more choices in group andindividual workspaces, more tools, even moreaccess to natural light, important elementsthat people need to be productive,” saysNancy Hickey, senior vice president and chiefadministrative officer.Augment collaboration byproviding the right spaces,tools, and technology.Ô Financial analyst Lauren Renner (far right) doesn’t havea dedicated workstation. Instead she and her colleagueschoose where and how they work by selecting the mostappropriate individual or group spaces throughout theday as their work changes.Ó Photos - top: media:scape TEAM theater meeting space, WorkCafé;bottom: Library, 3rd Floor, Global Headquarters
  • 20. 20 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comCREATING THE BEST PLACE“No matter what we consider our office orhome base, work keeps us moving. Peoplecan determine where and how they work best.The best place at 10 a.m. might not be thesame at 2 p.m. because you do different kindsof work,” says Hickey.“Using a strategy we call ‘Best Place”, wecreated a great range of flexible workspaces tomeet changing needs. You have the freedomto move, to collaborate, to put your headdown and focus. Freedom to seek the bestexperience at work, however you choose todefine ‘best.’”“‘Best place’ for Lauren and her colleaguesmeans a range of settings so they can choosehow and where they work,” saysJulie Barnhart-Hoffman, design principalwith WorkSpace Futures, the Steelcaseresearch and design group, and principaldesigner of this new work environment.“They have a palette of place – individual andgroup workspaces in the department,across the entire floor, the building and theSteelcase campus. People and work aremobile. A one-size workspace doesn’t fitanyone anymore.”The new approach fits Renner just fine. “I workin different places around the department, butI usually set up shop in the nomadic camp(an area of bench-style workspaces) becausepeople are so accessible here,” she says. “It’snice to be able to bounce ideas off of other“ Yes, there are more people inthe same space, but they havemore and better places towork. That helps productivityand wellbeing and that’s goodfor business.” Nancy Hickey Steelcase Chief Administrative Officer
  • 21. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 21people. You might work on a spreadsheet allday and can’t find something, and someoneelse will find it right away.” (For a typical dayat work for Lauren, see “It’s all in a day’s work”on pg. 36.)FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONSThe planning for “best place,” of course, beganwith the financials. “It started for us as it doesfor most organizations, as a real estate issue.We had two buildings and we needed to bringpeople together into one so they could workand collaborate better. The question became:How do we put more people into one buildingbut at the same time give them more of thespaces they need and better tools to workwith?” says Hickey.The factors that are easiest to measure –such as square footage, net usable spaceper person, desk sharing ratios, the cost oftechnology, etc. – aren’t always the things thatadd the most value to the organization. Moreimportant are issues such as encouragingmentoring to share knowledge and reinforceorganizational culture, supporting a range ofworkstyles for healthier, more engaged andmore satisfied employees, improvements insocial networks for better cross fertilizationbetween departments, and other qualitativefactors. These factors lead to the outcomesCEOs seek today: new product and serviceinnovations, talent attraction and retention,better customer support, etc.“It’s not just about compression. Yes, thereare more people in the same space, but theyhave more and better places to work, andmany more choices. They can work moreproductively, communicate more easily,collaborate at a moment’s notice, and adjusttheir environment to their work. That’s good forbusiness now and in the future,” says Hickey.Sylvester believes this new type of workplaceshould become the norm. “This is the kindof workplace companies everywhere shouldbe creating if they want to make real estatea competitive asset for the company.”34.9 % of the global workforcewill be mobile in 201234.9%Ó Global Headquarters, 3rd Floor, Cafe
  • 22. 80% of companies want peopleto collaborate more.80%Ó The nomadic camp, a series of bench-style workspaces open to everyone.
  • 23. QUESTION ASSUMPTIONS“Some people need a dedicated space for theirwork, but most people don’t. Those peoplewho need a dedicated space have them, butthey also can get up and move around, changepostures, or meet with others in a differentspace,” says Hickey.Any next workplace should be inherentlyadaptable. Gone are the days when cookie-cutter solutions could work – each organizationneeds its own blend of spaces, and it’simportant to balance owned and sharedspaces.Collaboration shouldn’t just happen inmeetings, It should happen effortlessly ininformal interactions in lounge areas, teamspaces, project rooms, and throughout theday as people communicate easily in thisopen office. Private spaces for focus orprivate conversations are equally important,of course, and it’s important to provide spacewhere small collaborations can break off fromlarger groups.84% of workers say they stayconnected to the organization viateam meetings.Doesn’t need a dedicated spaceanymore, but does need to be ableto easily connect with other people.
  • 24. 24 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com24 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comA “PALETTE OF PLACE”A “PALETTE OF POSTURE”Workstyles, mobility and job requirementsdiffer, so an interconnected workplace shouldinclude assigned workspaces for peopleconsidered residents, a “nomadic camp”shared by mobile workers, and a variety ofplaces for individual and group work thatanyone can use. A “palette of place” designstrategy assures a range of settings organizedinto interrelated zones.In addition to “palette of place,” there’s animportant corollary design strategy: “paletteof posture.” Steelcase research showsthat workers will switch between a varietyof physical postures during their work – ifthe space allows them to do so. Changingpostures is physically energizing and mentallystimulating, and it supports different workmodes. Workplace designs that allow peopleto vary postures help keep them refreshed andengaged, and support overall wellbeing.steelcase globalheadquarters:an interconnectedworkplace(continued on page 29)
  • 25. THE INTERCONNECTEDWORKPLACEHow to leverage the complexities ofcompeting in an interconnected world.PEOPLE NEEDPEOPLEPEOPLE NEEDTECHNOLOGYPEOPLE NEEDSPACES THAT BRINGTECHNOLOGY ANDPEOPLE TOGETHERCHALLENGEUNDERSTANDPALETTE OF POSTUREa range of solutions thatencourage people to sit, standor move throughout the dayPALETTE OF PLACEa range of settings organizedinto interrelated zonesCREATECHOICE AND CONTROLover how and where people workOFFERThis framework provides a methodology forcreating and assessing a workplace designedfor an interconnected world. It recognizesthat people need to do both individual “I”work and group “We” work. And it alsobreaks the paradigm that all individual spacesshould be assigned or “owned” or that allgroup spaces should be shared. The rangeof spaces in an interconnected workplaceneed to support focused work, collaboration,socializing and learning.360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 27
  • 26. 3rd FloorResident NeighborhoodThe LibrarySpaces where you can work alone,and concentrate.ResidentNeighborhoodCollaboration ZoneCollaboration ZoneCollaboration ZoneSpace metrics Pre Project Post ProjectNet usable square feet 51,681 26,925Net usable SF per person 191 154Net usable SF by function: Finance 26,975 11,550 Procurement 21,340 12,782 Quality 3,366 2,618Net usable SF per person by function: Finance* 184 154 Procurement* 198 154 Quality* 198 154Mobility/utilization metrics Pre Project Post ProjectDesk-Sharing ratio by function: Finance 1 to 1 1 to 1.36 Procurement 1 to 1.77 1 to 1.80 Quality 1 to 1 1 to 1.89Note: * The Finance pre-project space was intended for 146 occupants, the figures above reflect that. 75 people occupied the space at the time of the move. ** The Procurement pre-project space was intended for 108 occupants, the figures above reflect that. 83 people occupied the space at the time of the move.Steelcase Global Headquarters
  • 27. workcafÉNomadic CampA space shared by mobile workersNomadic CampThe CommunityCafe HiveA space designed for everyone touse when they want to see and beseen, but also get work done.LoungeKitchenDenCollaborationZoneLiving RoomBase Camp ConnectBoothsDining AreaINFORMATIONBARTerraceCollaboration Zone
  • 28. 28 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comThe workplace can be a competitive advantage when it’s designedto leverage opportunities created by an interconnected world.To accomplish this goal the workplace must address the five keyworkplace issues affecting organizations around the world. Lookingthrough the lens off these workplace issues, here are some designprinciples to consider:For more information on how to create an interconnected workplacecontact us at 360magazine@steelcase.com.OptimizeReal Estateê Provide a range ofsettings that supportsa variety of workstylesand the four modesof work: collaborate,focus, learn andsocialize.ê Organize intointerrelated zoneswith specific intentand vibe.ê Design settings formultiple functions.ê Consider alternativeworkplace strategies.EnhanceCollaborationê Create spacesdesigned to supportdifferent typesof collaboration:informative, evaluativeand generative.ê Support bothphysical and virtualcollaboration.ê Create spaces topromote unplannedinteractions:collaboration isiterative and rolling.ê Allow fortransparency whichbuilds trust – theheart of collaboration.Attract, Develop,Engage Peopleê Provide choiceand control overwhere and howpeople work.ê Create “third places”on campus forpeople to gather,or get away.ê Foster learning andmentoring in closeproximity to workers.Build Brand andActivate Cultureê Create spacesthat communicateyour brand to bothinternal and externalaudiences.ê Space shapesbehavior – createauthentic spacesthat foster thedesired culture tobuild your brand.ê Design spaces thatreflect your valuesand demonstrate thevalue of the peoplewho deliver yourbrand promise.Wellbeing@Workê Design spaces toencourage a varietyof postures – sitting,standing, perching,lounging, walking.ê Create zones thatamp up or down theamount of sensorystimulation – frombustling activity toquiet concentration.ê Create settingsthat encouragesocialization andcollaboration,and help peoplefeel a part of theorganization.Creating anInterconnectedWorkplace01 02 03 04 05
  • 29. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 29In the Strasbourg group’s previous office, 80percent of the real estate was dedicated toprivate, enclosed workspaces; now just 30percent is enclosed. The floorplan co-locatesspaces for different types of users, whichmakes it easy for people to find space to worknear colleagues with whom they regularlycollaborate, whether they’re a resident, nomador mobile worker.“Research shows that if people have to walkmore than 21 meters/65 feet to see someone,they’ll send an email instead. If they’re close,they’ll walk to see each other and communi-cate in person. Shortening the physicaldistances between people is one factor thathelps us improve our productivity. In fact,we’re handling twice as many projects now,with the same number of people,” saysGeorges Roux, architect and sales consultantin the Strasbourg office.Ó The new Steelcase space in Strasbourg supports 340 mobile, nomadic and resident users in a varied range ofworksettings designed to encourage communication and collaboration. Previously 80% of the real estate was private,enclosed workspaces; now just 30% is enclosed.(continued from page 24)91% of employees say it’s importantto have a space where they canrecharge and reenergize – but 49%say they don’t have them.91%49%Having the right workspace andtools is far more valuable toknowledge workers than havingan assigned desk.
  • 30. 30 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comResearch shows workers switchbetween a variety of physicalpostures during their work –if the space lets them.95% of employees say they needspaces for focused work – 40% saythey don’t have them.
  • 31. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 31Heads down focused work orteamwork? This space does both!SINGLE-USE SPACES NO MORETo optimize real estate, in Strasbourg a keyfeature of the new workplace is Le Kitchen.“Our cafeteria space is a place for doingbusiness,” says Roux.Overall, the Strasbourg floorplan dedicates10 percent of the space to Le Kitchen, coffeecorners and other spaces that purposelycombine dining and working. “These spacesbecome a crossroads, places where peoplesocialize and communicate and do business,”says Roux.If people have to walk morethan about 65 FEET/21 METERSto see someone, they’ll sendan email instead.
  • 32. 32 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comIn Grand Rapids, Steelcase’s formerheadquarters cafeteria had drawbacks typicalof many corporate dining areas. It was busy inthe morning for coffee, during lunch and againfor afternoon breaks. Outside of those times itwas a ghost town. Furniture was designed fordining, not working, and its basement locationput it out of the main traffic flow.Researchers examined how people were usingtheir lunch and break times. “Free time, inNorth America is now used for exercise, takingmeetings instead of breaks, eating lunch atthe desk while you make phone calls, searchon the web or catch up on work. People wantmore freedom to schedule their time andchoose when and how they work,” says CherieJohnson, a Steelcase design manager.Workdays are longer, schedules are erratic.“When your client or team is in another timezone, you need to work early or late, outside oftraditional business hours. When you can getfood easily and work alongside your colleagueswho are having a similar experience, it’s moresatisfying and it’s healthier, too,” she says.This understanding led to design strategiesfor WorkCafé, an on-site third place thatcombines dining and working. Food andbeverages are available throughout the day.Focused and collaborative areas for bothindividual and group work are blended withareas for dining. Social and respite areassupport socializing, working, networking andrelaxing. Informative learning spaces helpworkers connect with colleagues and learnabout the global company.The space is welcoming, inspiring andwell-equipped (including Wi-Fi, power outlets,media:scapes, etc.)People now come from across the Steelcasecampus and other locations worldwide tothe WorkCafé to eat, work, meet, socialize,network, relax. “The space has become anattractor because you meet more people faceto face,” says Johnson.This space supports so many different activitiesthat it’s become a crossroads for a global,interconnected company.PEOPLE NOW COME TO THE WORKCAFÉFROM ACROSS THE STEELCASE CAMPUSAND OTHER LOCATIONS WORLDWIDE TO EAT,WORK, MEET, SOCIALIZE, NETWORK, RELAX.
  • 33. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 33This space supports so many differentactivities that it’s become a busy intersectionfor Steelcase employees who are working in anincreasingly global, interconnected company.MANAGEMENT LEADS THE WAY“Leadership has to have faith that even thoughmobile workers aren’t always immediatelyvisible in the space, they have to trust thatthey’re making the best choices to get thework done,” says Barnhart-Hoffman. “Theyalso have to model the behavior they want.”Steelcase leaders and staff were fully engagedin planning the new work environments, andmany brought their own work experiences tothe planning process.For example, Sylvester, the CFO, worked inEurope before moving back to Grand Rapidsand had direct reports in the U.S., Europeand Asia. “I was in Strasbourg, France,so I worked a lot via email and phone and gotvery comfortable with a distributed team.”John Shull, vice president of procurement,spends much of his day moving betweenmeetings and projects around the GrandRapids campus. He has an office on theexecutive floor of global headquarters, butmost days carries a backpack with a laptop,smartphone, and materials he needs for theday’s events as he picks the best place suitedto what he plans to do, often in an open area.“Many times people will come up and we’lldiscuss a problem or cover something that willsave us a series of emails or even the need tohave a meeting,” says Shull.The Procurement department that Shullleads worked in a prototype space inSteelcase’s RD center for three years beforemoving into their new space at headquarters,testing the fit between new work behaviorsand different workspaces.CHANGE THE WORKPLACE,ACTIVATE THE CULTUREAn organization’s culture is often thought tobe hard to define, a qualitative measure witha tenuous connection to business results.Today’s most progressive organizations knowthe opposite is true: employee engagement inthe culture is fundamental to success.Engagement is driven by many factors,including effective management andchallenging work. Today more than ever, it’salso driven by the autonomy to choose thespaces, technology and tools to get workdone. A corner office used to be the mostcoveted workplace status symbol; today, thefreedom to choose where to work best is fastbecoming what workers want most, regardlessof rank.An interconnected workplace can enhanceengagement by supporting mobile workstyleswith a range of individual and groupworkspaces. It can provide the means forOne-size workspace doesn’t fit anymore.Work early. Stay late. This space givesmobile workers freedom to scheduletime and choose when and how to work.A definite advantage.Ó WorkCafé, Global Headquarters
  • 34. 34 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comconnection and collaboration, such asgroup workspaces, content-developmenttools and technology. People are moreengaged when their space supports thepredominant work mode in business today –project work – through team project spaces,content displays, etc.For most companies, successful changesin worker mobility, collaboration, andalternative work strategies require a shift inthe culture of the organization. Accordingto the Steelcase/CoreNet Global survey 48percent of companies believe culture changemanagement is very important to successfuladoption of a new work environment.Steelcase began the culture changemanagement process two years before theyopened new workspaces. “Using employeesurveys, we identified organizational practicesthat needed to change and then gotmanagement alignment around them.For example, we saw a need to make decisionsfaster and made it a priority. We workedwith leadership to encourage employees tomake more decisions at lower levels of theorganization, identified the resources peopleneeded, and worked with managers on thediscipline required to support new approachesto decision making,” says Hickey.Since more workers would be mobile in thenew workplace, “we focused on helping peoplelearn how to manage employees when youdon’t have line of sight of your staff, howto set objectives and measure results insteadof seat time.”A culture change management groupwith cross-functional representation createda playbook with information and directionfor managers.“The playbook is one tool for helping to changethe culture of the organization and ease thetransition to the new behaviors,” notes Hickey.TEST, MEASURE, ADJUSTBefore redesigning and renovating Steelcase’snew spaces, Steelcase designers builtprototype spaces. Worker feedback helpedrefine the spaces, and post-occupancyevaluations and ongoing observationalresearch will not only help to further refinethese spaces, but also will inform other spacesto be renovated in the future.No workspace is ever completely finished,says designer Barnhart-Hoffman. “At the Pixaranimation studio, they say they never reallyfinish a film, they just release it. I think that’s theway we have to look at work environments. Notjust because you want it to be as good as itcan be, but business changes so quickly now.You can’t relax. You have to give users moreoptions, more control over their space, and beready to change any space, even the spacesyou love the most.”°Space preferences vary by style, not age.“ Innovation requires amore agile organization,a more collaborativeworkforce and a workplacethat encourages both.” Jim Keane Steelcase PresidentStimulates and supportsthe ways people work now.
  • 35. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 35Eat, work, meet, socialize, network, relax.
  • 36. 36 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comLauren Renner represents much of what’srefreshing and new about business today.At 26, she’s a part of Gen Y, the youngpeople who are seemingly comfortablewith all technology, eager to learn fromeveryone, ready and willing to collaboratewith colleagues.A financial analyst at Steelcase, her careerexemplifies how much business has changed.Little more than a generation ago, womenmostly held clerical positions. Today they holdover half – 51.5 percent – of management,professional and related occupationsaccording to Catalyst, a nonprofit foundationthat advocates for women in business.Renner’s workplace is especially new. Her“office” is a series of workspaces at theSteelcase global headquarters, a workenvironment of individual and group spaceswith flexible furniture and tools that supporta range of workstyles, and a palette of placeand posture that are essential elements of aninterconnected workplace.Her typical day starts with a visit to theWorkCafé, an on-site third place for diningand working and where she often has animpromptu meeting with a colleague abouta current project. Sometimes she grabs aspace to catch up on email, make some calls,write a report. The WorkCafé is purposelydesigned to support this blend of individualand collaborative work common among mobileworkers like Renner.08:07It’s All In aDay’s Work(continued on page 43)
  • 37. Knowledge work today means frequent collaboration. Renner’ssupervisor, Tim Fennema (shown with Lauren above), schedulestwice-weekly team updates so everyone stays in touch. Even so,managers must adjust to not having “line of sight” to their directreports. “You have to trust that, as long as the work gets done,it doesn’t matter if I can see my team at work,” says Fennema.08:16Dropping into the WorkCafé,financial analyst Lauren Rennercollects breakfast at the coffeebar. She often meets colleaguesshe works with on differentprojects, and they take anearby workspace to discussa current issue.
  • 38. A height-adjustable desk is one option for Renner, who hasno assigned workspace. A favorite home base for the day:one of the bench-style workstations in the department’snomadic camp, spaces available to any worker.10:0902 coffee, cream, no sugar07 voicemails114 emails05 work spaces16 accidental encounters04 projects
  • 39. “We look at spreadsheets all day long andmedia:scape has really helped with that.Two of us put spreadsheets on the screens,you pull in others and everyone contributes.It’s great.”13:1214:15
  • 40. 40 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com
  • 41. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 4115:17This Collaboration Zone has everything Lauren needs to workthrough the budget process with the Brand Communicationsteam: display and projection surfaces, data and power accessand easily reconfigured tables and chairs.
  • 42. 42 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comThe Finance group closes the company books during the first twoweeks of each month. “You need to be visible to others when you’reclosing the books because it can get pretty stressful,” says Renner.“We work closely together so we can help each other out, getanother perspective on an issue.”16:22
  • 43. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 43Renner’s colleagues are sometimes located inother countries and telepresence helps bridgethe distance. When team members are locatedin different time zones, a mobile worker’s dayoften extends beyond normal business hours.17:40The new work environment for Finance,Quality and Procurement serves the threegroups (it used to support just one), as wellas visitors from other areas of the company.Most spaces are unassigned and can beused by anyone. Configurations range fromwide open to fully enclosed, in sizes right forindividuals, and small or large groups.Renner’s day is a series of collaborativemeetings punctuated by solo work. Her tools ofchoice are a smartphone, laptop and portablelaptop stand, a wireless mouse, keyboardand numeric keypad. She carries few papers,working almost exclusively with digital files.Although she’s assigned a drawer in a filecabinet for storage, she uses it rarely. “I usedto store my purse there, but I’m moving aroundso much I just carry it with me now.”Renner’s generation is often reported to preferworking at the local coffee shop, hunchedover a keyboard and plugged into an iPod. YetSteelcase research, including recent planningwith the people in the Finance, Procurementand Quality departments, show that “apreference for a certain type of workspacevaries more by workstyle than by age,” saysJulie Barnhart Hoffman, design principal withWorkSpace Futures, the Steelcase researchand design group, and principal designerof the new work environment.“There are different workstyles within eachgeneration – Boomers, Gen X and Gen Y.The important thing is not labeling workers bygeneration. We all need to be able to choosethe places we work, the tools we use, what’sbest for the work at hand,” she says.Tim Fennema, director of finance and Renner’ssupervisor, says, “We all had assigned desksbefore, but we’re all mobile, we deal with globalfinance issues and people around the world,so we’re used to working without ‘line of sight’to each other. We use instant messaging,media:scape to compare documents and shareideas, and we meet face-to-face if needed,either in person or using telepresence. As longas the job gets done, that’s the test. Peopleappreciate this level of freedom. It makes itmore enjoyable to come to work.”Renner changes locations throughout theday, switching between her bench workspace,a media:space collaborative work setting,a client’s office in another building, theWorkCafé on the first floor, and other spaces.“Sometimes I finish a meeting in the WorkCaféand just stay there and work for the restof the afternoon.”CHOICE + CONTROLShe doesn’t have an assigned desk or othertraditional totems of corporate success.Instead she has much more choice and controlover her work environment than previousgenerations, as well as better tools to supportthe ways she works.“I think success today is measured by the workyou’re doing and the responsibility you have.It’s not about having your own desk. I’d ratherhave the ability to choose where and howI work.” For Renner and knowledge workerslike her, the new status symbol is the freedoman interconnected workplace provides.°(continued from page 36)
  • 44. 44 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comDistributed But NotDistant: Bringing RemoteTeamMates to the TableKnowledge work is becoming increasingly collaborativeas we tackle more projects in groups, working side by side withcolleagues. But what if your job requires collaboration with peopleyou rarely, if ever, meet? Distributed teams are common in business,but that doesn’t make the essential challenge easier: How can widelydispersed people work well together? Better yet, how can theybecome true teammates whose work is greater than the sum of theirindividual efforts?Stephen Gale thinks he’s found the answer. He’s director, sales andmarketing communications for Steelcase’s Global Business Centerin Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a group of 350 people who provideproduct specification, renderings, and other sales and marketingsupport for various Steelcase offices and dealerships throughoutAsia. “Our people in the Global Business Center work in teams thatsupport particular markets. We wanted them to better understandthose markets and get to really know the people they’re working with,whether they’re in Beijing, Mumbai or Melbourne,” says Gale.Thus began the One Team initiative to turn distributed teams into tightlyknit colleagues. About a third of the Kuala Lumpur teams receivedhigh-definition cameras and life-size monitors linked to correspondingequipment in the cities they support. These telepresence links arelocated at the end of each team’s FrameOne bench workstation,and they’re always connected, always on.“You look up, there’s your colleague in Sydney, Australia. It’s likethey’re seated at the table with you even though they’re over 4,000miles away. You don’t have to start up a computer, connect it, putin a password and all that. It’s real-time communication; you feel likeyou’re in the room together.”This type of real-time telepresence link is sometimes called a“wormhole,” which is a hypothetical large-scale shortcut throughspace and time. Steelcase has been using real-time telepresencefor a few years, but this is the company’s first large-scaleimplementation of the system.Gale says they started seeing results in a matter of weeks. “It reallysimplifies the business. It eliminates putting out a phone call ormessage, hoping to reach someone, waiting for a response or evenhaving to schedule a conversation. You just look up and see if they’rethere and start talking.”The Kuala Lumpur team tested a variety of hardware and softwaresolutions before settling on telepresence. Training was minimal.Workers were told to consider the wormhole link another person orgroup at the table, and to use the same standards of office etiquette:consider what the person is doing before interrupting, keep yourvoice down, etc.Eleven teams in Kuala Lumpur have wormhole links with colleaguesin other cities and, given the growth of the company’s business in Asia,more links will likely be installed in the future.“What it does is remove the demarcation between offices,” says Gale.“Before, the relationship between the people in the other cities andour folks in the Global Business Center was kind of a customer/supplier relationship. Now there’s more of a sense that we’re on thesame team, we’re in this together, sharing wins and losses. People aregetting to know each other better, they’re looking out for things ratherthan waiting for them. It’s like having your coworkers sitting rightnext to you.”°“it’s like they’reseated at the tablewith you,even though they’re4,000 miles away.”
  • 45. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 45Ó Steelcase’s Global Business Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysiahas real-time telepresence links with 11 different cities in Asia.kuala lumpurbeijing
  • 46. 46 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comlessonslearnedlessons learnedPeople prefer working at an office because it’swhere colleagues, technology, and tools (in thatorder of importance) are most accessible. Keepthat ranking, and these lessons, in mind whenplanning an interconnected workplace.Honestly ASSESS corporate cultureHow much change does the organization need? How muchchange can it handle? What does the company need to do toadapt to the new economy? How broadly distributed are teams?A clear understanding of the organization’s culture shouldprecede any significant work environment changes.Communication is key, and it extends from the initial examinationof company culture into planning, designing and testing of theproposed new work environment through post-occupancyevaluation and tweaks to the space.Value real estate effectivelyBalance sheet valuations, while important, miss the point. How welloffice real estate fosters communication and supports collaboration, howwell it contributes to worker engagement and activates culture, how itcontributes to health and wellness – these are the measures of an office’svalue to the organization.Post-occupancy evaluations can show if collaboration has increased.They also measure how well people can access tools, technology andworkspace, how well departments are communicating with each other,indicators of how well your real estate is contributing to your businessresults. So, go figure.Determine critical success factorsWhat must the company do to achieve its goals? Since the office mustsupport these factors, identifying them helps drive workplace planningand design. Example: To enhance organizational collaboration,space must support one-on-one meetings at workstations, groupcollaboration and impromptu meetings, while also supporting thedifferent types of collaboration: informative, evaluative and generative.020301
  • 47. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 47Management sets the toneWorkers won’t adapt to a new work environment and newwork processes if leadership doesn’t model the behavior theorganization needs.Involving both management and employees in developing newwork environments also helps generate earlier employee buy-inand support for new ways of working.Understand the generations,but think agelessYes, the generations are different, but everygeneration borrows from and models theothers, so you can’t plan spaces based on agealone. A thorough understanding of businessgoals, group objectives and work styles drivesthe work environment design for all ages.REFINE. REDESIGN. REPEAT.Prototype the space, use it, refine it. After move in, check it again. What’s notused? Any places overbooked? Need more collaboration space? What’s in theway of better staff communication? Are there any work process workarounds?Great workspaces get that way because they are continually measured,reevaluated and improved.No single-use spacesWould you hire a person who can do only one thing? Don’t pay for real estatethat can’t multi -task. Consider how many different ways the space can beused. How easily the users can configure the space for the work at hand.How furniture can be used for multiple types of activity.Consider adding Wi-Fi, collaboration and technology tools to dining spaces,lobbies and in-between spaces to better leverage those spaces and provideworkers with more choice and control.LEVERAGE MOBILITY + MAKE IT EASYPlan for nomadic workers to easily find a space. Provide places forbackpacks, room to spread out, access to colleagues. More workersare going mobile every day; the office that offers a variety of spacesthat workers can easily find and adapt, will be the most successful.lessonslearned0506040807
  • 48. 48 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com
  • 49. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 49Small companiesare just like bigcompanies...onlydifferent.It’s not the size of the dog in the fight that matters,it’s the size of the fight in the dog, according to theold saying. It’s the same with a company in today’sglobal, mobile, interconnected world.Large or small, every company competes in the samemarketplace for talent, suppliers and, of course,customers so it takes something special for a smallcompany to thrive in this environment.Since their resources are comparatively limited, smallcompanies have to think and operate differently. Hiringfrom the same overall talent pool, they use their uniqueenvironments and workstyles that are seldom found at bigcompanies to attract workers. Hiring decisions are oftenbased on how well a person fits the company culture asmuch as the skills they offer. Company assets, such asreal estate, furniture and technology, are not only carefullyhusbanded but used in different ways, too.
  • 50. 50 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comThese insights and more were gatheredin a study of small companies conductedrecently by the Steelcase WorkSpace Futuresresearch and design group and sponsored byTurnstone, the Steelcase brand inspired by thespirit of small business. It’s the second studyof small companies sponsored by Turnstone.“We work with many small companies. Someact like big companies; others act completelydifferently. We wanted to understand newways to create a better experience for ourcustomers,” says Jim Abraham, head ofproduct marketing for Turnstone. “OurTurnstone team itself numbers about 30people, so we learned some things aboutbeing a better company, too.”Ó At RocketSpace, a shared office space in San Francisco for high-tech companies, benchworkstations support impromptu collaboration, knowledge-sharing and a sense of sharedendeavor. Benches reconfigure at, well, rocket speed.
  • 51. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 51The research involved on-site visits, interviewsand observations at 19 different companiesin the U.S., including private and nonprofitorganizations across a range of product andservice industries. The average company sizewas 40 to 50 employees.“We discovered some important nuancesin how small companies view their businessand how their size changes the way theyoperate,” says Melanie Redman, one of thelead researchers.A focus on employee wellbeingFor example, small companies are like smalltowns. Everybody knows each other, individualdistinctions are apparent, even celebrated. It’simpossible for the president of a Fortune 500company to personally know every employee,but the owner of a small company can.Consider an employee for a cleaning productscompany in Chicago. The woman’s car brokedown on the way to work. It was an old vehicle,the single mother’s only transportation, soshe caught a cab to the office. The companyowner soon heard the story. That afternoon hetook her out to find another car, loaned her themoney to buy it, and arranged for her to pay itback through payroll deduction.“Small companies are better able to reactto individual situations, instead of relyingon corporate policies and procedures,”says Redman.Other small companies have their own waysof watching out for their people:ê A software design firm founder believes thatthe industry’s typically crazy-long hoursaren’t good for a healthy lifestyle; he insistson maintaining regular business hours, and at3 p.m. each day all employees take a groupwalk outside to get refreshed.ê The owner of a search marketing firm foundedhis business where he could enjoy an outdoorlifestyle; he had a bike track built outside theoffice door for everyone to use.ê One company’s human resources departmentis named the “people department,” torecognize employees as individuals.
  • 52. 52 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comMaxing out workspacesSmall companies don’t have the resourcesof their larger cousins, so they expect space,furniture and tools to be hardworking. Furniturethat’s simple, adaptable and technology-friendly is a continuing theme, allowingemployees to move between individual andcollaborative work. Entry areas are used insome businesses for company meetings. Afew organizations rearrange desks on a regularbasis to keep people from getting into ruts.“We use space as a platform for building anecosystem for technology and new mediacompanies,” says Duncan Logan, founder ofRocketSpace, a shared office space in SanFrancisco for high-tech organizations. Logan’scompany (not part of the research study)uses its Turnstone furniture in its marketingefforts to prospective customers. “Try hiringa programmer these days and asking themto work on beat-up old furniture.”RocketSpace’s open plan offices include avariety of workspaces, technology and toolsin its monthly fee. “We know the importanceof good office space as well as the enormousbenefits in sharing with like-minded,fast-growth companies. Companies herespecifically mention RocketSpace in their adsas a draw for potential employees becausethe environment makes a difference to thesepeople, and the market for talent is verycompetitive,” says Logan.“Pretty muchevery week we’removing furniture.It’s like a giantgame of Tetris.” Duncan LoganRocketSpace founder
  • 53. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 53360.steelcase.com | Issue 62 | 53Open offices are popular in small companies.Walls, panels and doors can inhibit opencommunication and collaboration, key workmodes for these small organizations. Openenvironments encourage employees to beinformal, get to know each other and, notincidentally, have fun at work. Employees onskateboards, roaming pets and bikes used forcommuting are frequent sights at smaller firms.At an online sports equipment retail company,the staff is so passionate about sports that it’snot unusual for people to bike to work and startwork while still in their bike clothes.Small company wisdomOrganizational culture is duly recognized ascritical to a small company’s success and theycommunicate their culture at every opportunity,often using their products, packaging andmarketing materials as decor. Company valuesare posted prominently. And since peopledrive culture, finding the right employees isapproached with great care. Prospectiveemployees at an online craft and art marketingfirm are interviewed over a game of tabletennis, since the owners believe it reveals howwell people deal with competition and stress.Small company insights have influencedthe experiences that Turnstone provides itscustomers. “Employees put bikes, skateboardsand snowboards on display on shelves likeartwork. They have a passion for their spaceand how it reflects their company. The wayindividuals can express themselves is a bigreason why they work at small companies,”says Abraham. It also inspired some uniquestorage approaches, incorporated into thenew Bivi™ benching system.At RocketSpace, with nearly 100 companiesand 400 people using its 40,000 square feetof shared space, “Pretty much every weekwe’re moving furniture,” says Logan. “It’s likea giant game of Tetris. One company says‘We want to take that corner space and wewant to reconfigure the desks,’ and anotherone will say ‘We’ll take their space.’When the company owner heardhis employee’s car had brokendown, he bought her a new one.Ó Open-plan offices at RocketSpace reinforce thetransparency that inspires employees of small companies.People know how their work impacts their coworkers andthe overall company.Ó Small companies believe it’s crucial that newemployees can work well with others and fit easilyinto the company culture.Small BusinessInsightsIndividuals matterEmployees are individuals, not “people”or “staff.”Employees are hired first for culture fit,not skill fit.What is appropriate in personal lifeis appropriate at work.Employees are empowered to makedecisions and take on different roles.Community mattersInterdependency between the company andthe local community is mutually beneficial.Invest time, resources and money in the localcommunity, regardless of direct benefits.External transparency engenders trustamong customers and employees.Space mattersSpaces need to quickly and easily transform.Open spaces promote energy in an informal,fun and sociable context.These spaces were never intendedto be offices.Financial mattersInvest in people regardless of direct benefits.Business critical issues may be different thanthat of large companies.Spend money on what’s available and what’swithin budget, and be intentional about it.Spirit mattersBe nimble, respond quickly and thinkoutside of the box.Question yourselves and try new things.Be true to who you are in terms of valuesand mission.Success is not about becoming big.Passion mattersMake the world better.Be extremely passionate aboutcustomer service.Passion and purpose attract new employees.Passion for the environment isn’t justabout marketing.For more information about Turnstone,visit myturnstone.com.
  • 54. 54 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com“It’s absolutely no problem for us. We justdisassemble the Bivi desks, move andreassemble them. All the fasteners are metalon metal, or going into bolt holes. You candisassemble and assemble it as many timesas you want. Whether it’s a one-person officeor a meeting room or a desk for six people,it’s the same legs, so we’re not constantlylooking for parts. It’s been easy.”Turnstone, in turn, learns from RocketSpaceusers. Workers at one start-up turned a smallTurnstone table on its side so they could use itin a new way. Few of the high-tech firms ask forpedestals, since workers store most contentdigitally, yet many tech workers want a lot ofdigital display – as many as four, 30” monitorson a single desk.Most any company can learn from how smallcompanies operate: Real estate shouldcontribute to your business performance.Space, furniture and tools must be utterlyadaptable in today’s globally competitiveenvironment. Each individual brings uniquecharacteristics to the organization’s cultureand identity.“A CEO at a large corporation can’t help everyemployee whose car breaks down,” notesRedman. “But the idea of supporting theindividual, fostering better communication andcollaboration, using space to express companyculture – those are helpful insightsfor organizations of any size.”°For more insights from Turnstone’s small companyresearch, contact Jim Abraham at jabraham@myturnstone.comCompany sizeinfluenceshow firms thinkabout people,real estateand furniture.
  • 55. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 55
  • 56. 56 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comWhat do people respond to the most in The Shift?Two things. The first is the 32 trends (implications of the five forces) we’ve identified through our research,and the second is the shift around networks. I think people have really begun to realize the importanceof your “posse,” the people that surround you who are your community of support.Meet Lynda Gratton. She says the forces shaping the future are here now, changing how we work todayand how we’ll work for the next 10 to 15 years. She’s a London School of Business professor, consultant,author and global entrepreneur, and she explores a deeply challenging future in The Shift: The Future ofWork is Already Here. HR magazine recently named her Most Influential UK Thinker. The Times and TheFinancial Times rank her as one of the most influential business thinkers around. Gratton spoke with 360from London.QA withLynda grattonLife would be so much easier if someonegave us a peek at the future, right?LONDON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS PROFESSOR AND AUTHORSEES FIVE FORCES AFFECTING OUR LIVES: TECHNOLOGY,GLOBALIZATION, DEMOGRAPHY AND LONGEVITY, SOCIETYAND ENERGY RESOURCES.
  • 57. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 57You say that people strugglewith networks. How so?Their ideas of networks have beentoo simplistic that the best thingyou can do is to meet everybodyelse. You have to be much moreexplicit about the quality andtype of networks you want. Whatwe know is that networks formthrough proximities. The layoutof a place and the circulationprocess are absolutely crucial.In my book Hot Spots, I talkedabout how gaining a level ofmastery of your skills is influencedby who you decide to sit nearor next to. Are you sitting nextto the right people?How can space help an organization adapt to the five forcesshaping the future?One way is through flexibility in terms of where you work. A number ofcompanies are considering how to create a way of working that suitspeople from many different backgrounds and will also allow them to havesome of the excitement that comes from working in great locations, andalso the comfort of occasionally working from home. But it’s complicated.British Telecom (BT) put a lot of people to work from home, and foundthat these people got really lonely. At the same time they didn’t wantthem all commuting into the center of London. So they’re creatingcommunity hubs where people from all different parts of BT can cometogether, to actually see each other and get an opportunity to use videoconferencing and other tools. Just putting everybody into a home officeisn’t necessarily the right solution. You also have to think about how toconnect them.
  • 58. 58 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comHow can companies help workersupgrade and adapt their skills toadapt to the five forces?A company can play a hugerole by encouraging people todo so and by making resourcesavailable. Not only technicalresources, but actually givingpeople time to think. In academiawe get sabbaticals where wecan go and do something elsefor six months at a time.I remember talking to a man lastyear about sabbaticals and hesaid, ‘Yeah, I had a sabbatical.’And I said, ‘That’s great, did itlast for six months?’ And he said,‘No, it was a day.’ That’s not abreak! The sheer pressure oftechnology – hundreds of emailseveryday, meetings, the level offragmentation and the level ofinterruption that occurs – makeit terribly difficult for people tostep back for the learning anddevelopment that’s so important.Are teams getting larger becausethe problems are more complexor is it because technologyallows us to connect easily withso many people?It’s a bit of both. Organizationsthat go across more than onecountry are, in a sense, forcedto create these very diverseteams. Some of them can bereally quite large and as a resultthey struggle.What are the offices like for yourcompany, Hot Spot?We’re now located at SomersetHouse, an old governmentbuilding in London that’s beenturned over to become the largestcreative cluster in Europe. It’s fullof little creative companies likeours, with a buzzing, amazingatmosphere. We were a virtualteam and now work together.It’s made such a difference tous in terms of creative energyand excitement. SomersetHouse also has an art gallery,exhibitions, fashion shows. It’san extraordinary place. If you cancreate different hubs where youget different people together, theopportunities are endless.What’s your office like?I have four of them and they’reall quite different. At SomersetHouse I work at a table in themiddle of our office. My officeat home I use for my writing,because I need to have completesilence when I write. My LondonBusiness School office is only formeetings. I carry a little MacBookAir with me. I do all my emailsoff my iPhone. I also work in aweekend home near Barcelona.What’s your workstyle? Do youarray information around you?I don’t put stuff on the walls.I use different screens. WhenI write books I do that on myown, in silence, in my house inLondon. Or in Barcelona, where Isit on a couch that looks over theMediterranean. I just put my feetup, and write.
  • 59. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 59How prepared is Gen Y to confrontthese five shifts?Gen Y people are very keen foran opportunity to work. Thetragedy for this generation is thatwhen a person doesn’t work inthe first three or four years oftheir careers, according to ourresearch that actually blights theircareer for decades. They don’testablish work habits; working atthe university is not the same aswork. And work habits, the habitsof getting in and working andfocusing, take time to develop. Myworry is that these young people,especially educated individualsthat struggle to get an opportunityto work, lose the capacity tobuild work-ready skills. But oncethey’re in the workforce you canstand back and let them get onwith it, and you’ll find that they doextraordinary things.You write a lot about theimportance of tacit knowledgeand sharing it with youngerpeople. How can companiestap this knowledge?It’s a huge challenge. Thereare some American companieswhere three-quarters of the workforce will be leaving within fiveyears. And a lot of the knowledgethey’ve got is tacit knowledgein the sense that it’s knowledgethey haven’t really shared yet.Mentoring and coaching are goingto play a very important role. Weneed more experienced workersto mentor young people andshare with them the knowledgethey’ve got of the market, ofcustomers, and so on.How do you encourage mentoring?We did a lot of research on it,and we found that whetheror not companies made it arequirement didn’t seem to makeany difference as to whether itwas happening. You have to makeit an explicit role and then youtrain people how to do it.But what really made a differencewas the role modeling of seniorexecutives. Once peoplesee management mentoringothers, they’re more likely todo it themselves.°
  • 60. 60 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comA look at people and organizations that are making theworld better for us all.sustainabilityspotlightTony D’Orazio is like a lot of people.He’s a businessman who doesn’t think of himself as an environmental activist. But in the processof pursuing business goals, he’s discovered ways to have big impact. And the more he’s learnedabout sustainability, the more he wants to do.VerticalScreen
  • 61. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 61As CEO of Vertical Screen, Inc., anapplicant screening company in Warminster,Pennsylvania, D’Orazio recently movedmore than 300 employees into a new50,000-square-foot LEED PlatinumCertified headquarters building.“We’d been growing for years and I neededto make a decision: lease another buildingor build new. We couldn’t find the right spaceto lease, so I was stuck with the other option.Everybody knows that built structures havea huge negative impact on the environmentif they’re done in the standard way. I felta personal responsibility to build in anenvironmentally responsible way,” he says.Creating a building that could achieve LEEDPlatinum certification offered practical businessadvantages, too. D’Orazio knew it couldhelp make Vertical Screen an employer ofchoice among the Gen Yers that comprisemost of his workforce. He knew it wouldtangibly position Vertical Screen to clients as aprogressive company by providing a real-worlddemonstration of what a green building cando. He knew investing in a sustainable buildingwould pay off down the road in energy savings.And there were tax advantages. It all added upto the right thing to do.Built at the end of a large runway on theformer Naval Air Warfare Center, the newbuilding resembles a huge hangar. In total,
  • 62. 62 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com
  • 63. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 63it’s a testament to an accumulation ofenvironmentally responsible choices madein concert with Erdy McHenry Architecture– from the barrel shape that encloses spacewith minimal surface geometry, to theredevelopment of an existing Brownfield site,to construction processes that minimizedwaste, to materials such as bamboocasework and recycled tire carpeting, to theenergy-efficient mechanical systems includinggeothermal HVAC and rainwater harvestingsystems. Even the art collection displayedthroughout, which depicts environmentalneglect, is integrated into the message: thebuilding represents a conservation-focusedfuture, rather than the wasteful past.Just as important was creating a workplacethat supported the comfort, productivity andwellbeing of his employees.Having started his business in 1989 in an extraroom of his apartment, D’Orazio knows howmuch space can matter. In this new building,he didn’t want his employees to feel closed in,especially because of the kind of work they do.“My employees are basically knowledgeworkers who do a lot of focused, solitaryresearch. Like most businesses, and especiallybecause we’re still growing, we needed tomaximize our real estate, which translates intodensity. I wanted to create a functional settingthat would look and feel great, too,” he says.With lots of glass on three sides, including40-foot-high glass curtain walls on the eastand west sides of the building and a 10-foot-high, all-glass south wall, the building wasdesigned to let the sunshine in and providepicture-perfect views of the countryside.A large garden wall brings nature inside,and private offices were sited in a centralmezzanine instead of on outer walls. As aresult, non-management employees enjoythe best views.D’Orazio gave his employees a choice atthe beginning of the project: an open benchsetting or separate workstations. They choseworkstations to improve concentration, butthat hasn’t put them in cubicles. Instead ofpanels, Steelcase Post and Beam screensbetween workstations provide visual privacywithout enclosure.With his new headquarters, D’Orazio is clearlymoving his business forward by putting theneeds of people and planet first.“I wanted to create a unique building andprovoke discussion,” he says. “I’m not tryingto convert everybody to be green, but I amhoping this building will help more peopleat least think about the choices they have.I’ve had the advantage of being able to learnthrough this project. I hope others can learnfrom it, too.”°
  • 64. Ó Outdoor Terrace, WorkCafé, Steelcase Global HeadquartersThe NewThird Place
  • 65. Giving workers controland choice over whereand how they work
  • 66. 66 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comFree-address workplaces. Collaboration hubs.Third places, and now even fourth places.Alternative workplaces. Coworking spaces.Serviced offices.Whatever they’re called or where they’relocated, they’re the workplace equivalentof the Zipcar – spaces that are shared,swapped, reserved, rented or simply claimedfor a time, versus individually “owned.” Likethe Zipcar, these new workplaces offer atrio of advantages: financial, cultural andenvironmental. No wonder they’re fastbecoming an important component of thenew normal for progressive companies allover the world.The timing is right – some say overdue – for anextreme makeover of the traditional workplace.Shared spaces give owners a way to shrinkreal estate or optimize what they have toaccommodate more people, which translatesquickly into cost savings. At the same time,shared spaces are more appealing to buildcommunity and give workers choice andcontrol over where they work, dependingon the task at hand. And, as a form ofcollaborative consumption, they’re an Earth-friendly way to use fewer resources while stillhaving everything that’s needed for productivework in an interconnected world.No wonder a growing number of organizationsrecognize that non-traditional workplacestrategies and spaces can contribute to theiroverall business effectiveness and efficiency.By increasing shared space and decreasingassigned space, organizations can quickly anddramatically improve their real estate ROI.A turnaround on theway to the next latteThe phenomenon of alternative work settingsstarted more than a decade ago, as mobiletechnologies led to an eureka: knowledgework can happen almost anywhere – at home,in coffee shops, at the library, in a park oreven, if you believe the ads, by the poolor at the beach.In those early dot-com days, workers werelured away from the office and owners werelured by the potential to reorganize theirworkforce and spend less. A new term,“alternative work strategies,” was born.It means allowing or even encouragingpeople to work anywhere they want.Findings from a March 2011 survey sponsoredby Steelcase Inc. and CoreNet Global confirmthat now most companies have formalized analternative work strategy. Only 14 percent saidthey don’t have an alternative work strategyand aren’t planning to implement one this year.When alternative work was still a new trend,people speculated that workplaces couldeventually disappear because everyone wouldinstead be working at home or in “third places,”a term defined by sociologist Ray Oldenburg as“great good places” where people can gatherand interact, in contrast to a first place (home)and second place (work).“Oldenburg identified eight essentialcharacteristics that define third places,”says Steelcase workplace researcher FrankGraziano. “Together, these characteristicscreate a de-stressing destination providinga sense of ease and warmth – a cozy feelingknown in Germany as ‘gemütlich.’”Because coffee shops were among the firstpublic places to serve up wireless along witha gemütlich vibe, they quickly became popularthird places for work.An alternative workstrategy doesn’tmean you have to tellemployees to stayaway from the office.
  • 67. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 67That is, until reality started colliding with thedream. “Everyone thinks working away fromthe office is ideal until you do it,” is a sentimentexpressed often by today’s mobile workers.The Steelcase/CoreNet survey confirmedthat, while most companies have alternativework strategies in place, most workers arestill coming into the office anyway. Nearly 50percent of respondents said they have 10percent or fewer employees covered undertheir alternative work strategy.Most workers are still coming to the workplacebecause they believe it’s the best place to getwork done. Specifically, more than 70 percentof respondents said the office is the best placeto interact with colleagues, and 40 percentsaid the office provides access to needed toolsand technology.But that doesn’t mean they’re satisfied with theworkplaces they have. They’re working in newand unconventional ways, and their needs aredifferent and more complex than ever. Despitethis reality, two out of every three workersfeel that their current spaces don’t supporta variety of activities, according to SteelcaseWorkplace Satisfaction Surveys.Especially because more is being asked ofworkers today, they want the best of all worlds:the right tools, a range of comfortable andwelcoming settings and, more important, theability to collaborate easily with other people.Increasingly, says author and social theoristRichard Florida, there’s a need for what hecalls fourth places – “where we can informallyconnect and engage and dialogue, but alsowhere we can work.”More choices for where to workA growing number of organizations nowrecognize that non-traditional workplacestrategies and spaces can contribute to theiroverall business effectiveness and efficiency.Steelcase researchers have categorizedthe various places where work gets done,and focused on alternative workspaces thatextend a company’s real estate or are withinexisting facilities.These types of spaces, especially coworkingfacilities, are emerging in major urban centersaround the globe. According to one estimate,the number of coworking facilities has doubledin the past 18 months, now up to about 1,000worldwide. Coworking spaces and satelliteoffices are proliferating especially fast in muchof Europe, according to Steelcase’s SudhakarLahade, who has researched workplacecultures and generations globally. Lookingat regional, cultural and social trends,it’s clear that there’s negative stigma attachedto working at home throughout most ofEurope. No doubt a contributing factor:Many residences in Europe are smallercompared to North American standards, andthere’s typically not extra space for a separatehome office.Another reason European companies andmunicipalities are aggressively supportingcoworking is to reduce the negativeenvironmental impacts of car commutes. Forexample, in France every day 50,000 peoplecome into Strasbourg for work, 87 percentof them by car. The city hopes to create sixcoworking centers in the next three years toreduce the distances that people commutefor a least a few days a week.In India, streets are congested and commutesare long even on mass transit. Workingfrom home typically isn’t possible, due toa joint family system and the size of homes.As a result, India could quickly gravitate tothe emerging trend of satellite offices, saysLahade. This could have a favorable effecton a company’s ability to attract and retainthe best talent, a big issue in India’s economicclimate of galloping opportunity. Moreover,he adds, “such places could act as a levelerfor people coming from diverse social, financial,educational and religious backgrounds, andtherefore become highly desirable.”No matter where they’re located, as alternativeworkplaces are created, they’re bringingpeople, space and technology together innew ways.8 Characteristicsof Third Placesas defined by Ray Oldenburg1. Placed on neutral ground2. Act as a leveler3. Conversation is the main activity4. Allow for accessibilityand accommodation5. Host a stream of regulars6. Keep a low profile7. Maintain a playful mood8. Act as a home away from homeThe lingo is evolving almost as fast asthe spaces, but in general here’s whatthe terms usually mean:ê Coworking facilities are analternative to working at home withan emphasis on creating community,usually for self-employed individualsand small start-upsê Serviced offices provide conveningspaces for groups that need to worktogether for a specific number of days;used concurrently or sequentially bymultiple groups or companies; alsosometimes called collaboration hubs.ê Co-owned/leased facilitiesput multiple companies into oneworkplace on a long-term basis,usually with separate spaces assignedto each company and some shared.ê Satellite offices provide corporatehoteling options for a company’smobile employees.ê Hybrid facilities combine residentand mobile employees in a singlecorporate space.ê In-house third spaces providea casual, coffee-shop atmospherefor work within a corporate space.
  • 68. 68 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com
  • 69. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 69Coworking: betahaus Berlin“The coworking concept is perfect for thedaily working life of our generation,” saysTonia Welter, co-founder of betahaus in Berlin,a coworking facility that caters to a growingnumber of freelancers and small start-ups.“It’s the materialization of Facebook, socialnetworking in real life.”Workers rent space by the day or month,and share all the resources there, includingwireless connectivity, laser printers, openareas for conversation and brainstorming,meeting rooms for collaborative brainstormingor customer presentations, a kitchen andwhat’s called the “Open Design City,” anexperimental studio to create mock-upsof new product ideas.Designed by Klemens Vogel from Vogel/WangArchitektur, the ambience is a cross betweena café house in Vienna and an internet caféin Silicon Valley, providing social contact withina supportive workplace.Coworking facilities provide a better balancein what Welter describes as “the small frontiersbetween work and life.”“Everyone needs an efficient work environmentthat provides all the necessary technicalequipment and also supports wellbeing,”she says.At betahaus, there’s good food in the café,indoor plants and access to an outdoor gardenand multiple environments to suit a moodor task. Sited close to public transportationand restaurants, the facility makes it easy forpeople to leave their cars at home. The medianage of users is 25–35, and most of them comeby bike.The café is the entry point where people canmeet and mingle. A weekly breakfast forum isopportunity for people to present themselvesand share ideas. One floor above the cafeteriaare open spaces for people working ontheir own. Another floor up is for start-upcompanies, with team spaces for 4–8 peoplefurnished by Steelcase with cobi®chairs andmobile Frisco®tables. At the center, separateteams can come together to exchange,collaborate and co-create.Karim Bouchouchi from the two-personcompany netzwiese says he appreciates thatthe furniture does its job without demanding alot of attention whenever it needs to be movedor adjusted.The entire facility was intentionally designedto be a platform for networking.“Some users have cooperated to create newstart-up companies, win a new customer orsimply consult with each other. Users are veryopen and see ways to improve by tappinginto coworkers’ expertise,” says Welter.Opened in 2009, betahaus Berlin now attractsabout 120 users on a regular basis. Thefounders have recently opened a betahausin Hamburg and are planning for facilities inLisbon, Cologne and Zürich.The demand for coworking facilities isincreasing rapidly in Europe. Although themovement started primarily to meet theneeds of freelancers and small companies,a spill-over effect is underway as corporationsand cities see the attraction these spaceshave for employees and the potential theycreate for better, faster innovation. Perhapsa sign of what’s to come: “Is a coworkingecosystem the future of innovation incorporations?” was a topic covered in the“Coworking Europe 2011” conference.“Coworking opens up new possibilities,” saysWelter. “Imagine you can be in Lisbon in thesummer surfing and in the winter in Zürichskiing in the Alps. Work wherever you want!”Ó Social networking is a big part of the draw of coworkingspaces (like betahaus in Berlin - pictured above and left),and shared team spaces make it easy to mingle andexchange ideas.
  • 70. 70 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comCo-leasing: GRid70Imagine the possibilities when you bringcreative workers from five very differentcompanies together in a single building.GRid70 is a first-of-its-kind design hub indowntown Grand Rapids, Michigan. Amway,Meijer, Wolverine World Wide, Pennant Healthand Steelcase occupy different areas withinthe four-story building, but share commonspaces, too.“Our belief is that mixing creative teamsfrom different industries will spawn ‘happyaccidents’ that inspire innovation, newproducts and different ways of thinking,”says John Malnor, Steelcase’s vice presidentof growth initiatives.“Another benefit is that we’re all sharing thecost of very high-performance collaborativespaces that are being utilized 80 percent ofthe time. If each company created comparablespace just for them, everybody would spendsignificantly more and have a much lowerutilization rate. Especially in today’s economyand with commitments to sustainabilitystronger than ever, this kind of collaborativeconsumption makes good business sense.Using less is better than using more.”The fourth floor of GRid70, the shared space,consists of four different collaboration areas.The design of each is based on insights fromSteelcase research, with different applicationsto support different types of collaboration:informative, evaluative and generative.The Media Conference Room, for example,is equipped with a four-monitor media:scapecollaborative setting, perfect for generativework among up to six people.The Skunkworks Room, in contrast, is a highlyflexible space designed for information sharing,brainstorming and iterative work involvingup to 24. There are no doors, the furnitureis all moveable and accommodates sitting,standing or leaning. There are whiteboards allover and, of course, the room is equipped forvideoconferencing and projection.The Forum is a private, closed-off room for upto 32 people. Equipped with both interactiveand traditional whiteboards, it’s designed forintense and focused idea generation.The Gallery is a fairly formal space forinformation sharing and evaluation, witha boardroom-style table that allows up toeight users to show their content using amedia:scape offset application, with displays ateach end of an asymmetrical surface providingoptimal visibility for all participants.The variety of spaces at GRid70 are tools thatsupport worker’s basic needs, says Malnor –the need to be around others, to be stimulatedby choices and changes, and the opportunityto network your way to new ideas andinnovation. He describes it as “open platformthinking” applied to real estate.Wolverine moved its product designersfor eight diverse brands to GRid70. Thesedesigners were previously siloed in separatefacilities. Wolverine made the move to increasecommunication, collaboration and innovationacross the brands, says Rob Koenen, vicepresident and general manager for CATfootwear, a division of Wolverine World.“The space and the technology at Grid70 areperfect in so many ways,” says Koenen. “We’velearned that space can drive innovation asÓ Not all collaboration is the same, and different types requiredifferent spaces. At GRid70, this room supports focused,generative collaboration, while other spaces have beendesigned for informative and evaluative work.
  • 71. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 71much as people can. It can create a whole‘tribe’ that looks out for each other and sharesexperiences and what they know.”The business benefits are clear. “We’re seeinginnovation get more engendered in the DNAof all of our company because of this space,”says Koenen.Cross-company collaboration is starting tohappen, too, as people from all five companiesmingle in shared areas. Recently, just by talkingtogether informally, designers from Steelcaseand Wolverine discovered that a material usedin Steelcase seating could be a perfect solutionfor a Wolverine footwear product.“The real value is driven by outcomes andimpact on the organization in terms of moreinnovation and reduced cycle time on productdevelopment,” says Malnor. “But there’s anefficiency gain, too, in terms of needing lesscore space and realizing higher usage of thereal estate.”
  • 72. 72 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comIn-house third space:Steelcase WorkCaféAdopting an alternative work strategydoesn’t mean you have to tell your employeesto stay away from the office. It’s possible toreduce your real estate and keep employeesat the workplace by creating an in-housealternative space.At Steelcase’s Global Headquarters inGrand Rapids, Michigan, the recentlyopened WorkCafé optimizes real estate bycombining a cafeteria and a variety of workareas into square footage that was previouslyunderutilized as just a cafeteria.With a bistro ambience and high-functioningwork settings, it’s immediately becomea destination of choice throughout theday for building residents, and mobileand visiting employees.“We wanted to create workspace in thecorporate world that typically was onlyavailable to small companies – you know,five guys and a dog in a small boutiquefirm,” says Joey Shimoda, AIA, principal ofShimoda Design Group in Los Angeles, theproject’s architectural firm. “Our personal andprofessional lives are meshed now, and peopleneed spaces where they can flourish whateverway they’re working, from very private spacesto very public spaces and everythingin between.”Designed to be both a hub and a haven, theWorkCafé supports almost anything employeeswant to do – catch up on work, catch up withcolleagues, catch up on news and, of course,eat. There are a variety of spaces, includingopen and closed meeting spaces, areasthat accommodate stand-up, sit-down or“Our personal and professional lives aremeshed now, and people need spaceswhere they can flourish whatever waythey’re working.”Ó Dining space, WorkCafé, Steelcase Global Headquarters
  • 73. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 73perch postures as well as indoor and outdooroptions. Choices range from places designedfor focus to an open lounge with a Starbucksand a stand-up bar for quick, passing-byconnections.Colors were carefully selected to contributeto the mood of the different spaces, startingwith bright colors that greet visitors as theycome down a broad walnut entrance stairwaycanopied in part with a wayfinding sculpture.“I don’t think any corporation in the U.S. hasan entry like this,” says Shimoda.“As you come down the stairs and enterthe space, that first area is the most open,the most social. It has more vibrant, warmercolors. The coffee bar is there, a pantry, themonitor wall with virtual links to Steelcasecompanies and locations around the world,and there’s always a lot of activity there.You see a lot of people and feel the energyof the space right away,” says BarbaraGoodspeed, senior interior designer withSteelcase WorkSpace Futures.The intensity of hues progressively amps downuntil you reach a quiet study zone tucked in therear corner.
  • 74. 74 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.com
  • 75. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 75Ó Most company cafeterias boast a 60%+ occupancy rate only duringlunch and are vitually empty the rest of the day. Steelcase’s newWorkCafé provides spaces for working as well as eating, therebyboosting the overall efficiency of the space throughout the day.
  • 76. 76 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comÓ And you can eat here, too! All these spaces are directlyadjacent to the food service area in Steelcase’s new WorkCafé,occupying floor space that was previously for dining only.Ó Collaboration Zone, WorkCafé, Steelcase Global Headquarters
  • 77. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 77Ó Den, WorkCafé, Steelcase Global Headquarters
  • 78. 78 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comÓ Base Camp and Connect Booths, WorkCafé, Steelcase Global Headquarters
  • 79. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 79Brand displays are inspirational andinformative, especially an immersive sculpturethat has engraved on it the numbers of all1,320 patents Steelcase has secured duringits 100-year history. Above, a reflective surfaceshowcases the person standing beneath.The embedded message: Every employee isimportant to the success of the company.Abundant video-conferencing capabilitiesmake it easy for distributed teams to meetvirtually, and there’s a business centerright down a hall if printing, scanningor photocopying is needed.Near the kitchen/cafeteria are lockers to stashlaptops and other valuables. Healthy food isavailable for extended hours, so employeeswho need to stay late or come earlier tovideoconference with someone on theother side of the globe can be nourished.The WorkCafé was carefully designed tomerge work and dining and support variedworkstyles, says Cherie Johnson, designmanager, showrooms and branded spaces,Steelcase Design Studio. “We wanted to createa social, psychological and physical balanceto promote a more positive sense of wellbeing.We wanted Steelcase employees to realize allthe benefits of a connected workplace.”“This is a great example of leveraging realestate in new ways,” Goodspeed says.“It doesn’t always mean smaller, or simplymore people in the same space. It meansbeing smarter about what space can do,how you apply furniture, tools and technologyto support how people live and work today.”Putting work in its placeWith more and more mobility, work isbecoming what you do versus where you go.Ironically, the freedom to choose where to workis raising the bar for workplaces everywhere.“Good enough” spaces are only good enoughif you’re required to be there or have nowhereelse to go.As IDEO’s Tom Kelley says in his book The Artof Innovation, “Everyone knows the legend thatinnovation starts in a garage, but sooner orlater we all grow up and need a place to work.”The same can be said of coffee shops,libraries, park benches, pools and most othercasual third-place destinations: sooner or later,they’re just not good enough places to doreally good work.°
  • 80. 80 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comAbout the author,Lennie Scott-Webber, Ph.D.I’ve owned and operated design firmsin the U.S. and Canada, taught at threeuniversities and held administrativepositions as well, all the while research-ing educational environments. Overthe years I’ve seen the insides of moreclassrooms than I can count. Manyof them are an insult to students andteachers alike.My passion, and my job, is helpingpeople understand the behaviors thatcome from different environments, andcreating classrooms that truly supportnew ways of teaching and learning.Ideas on planning and designing learning spaces from Lennie Scott-Webber, Ph.D.,director of education environments for Steelcase Education SolutionsThe future of education: using space,pedagogy and technology to createreal engagement between studentsand instructors.A new learning curveSteelcaseeducationsolutionsA woman and her daughter drove six hoursto a prestigious university, eager to attend theorientation program for prospective students.The next morning, just 10 minutes into thebig campus tour, the daughter spotted aclassroom. It wasn’t on the tour; classroomsrarely are. But the young woman peeked insideanyway. She turned and ran to catch up withher mother. “Mom, they use chalkboards.We are so out of here.”It’s a true story – and points to what’s wrongwith education today.It’s not that Gen Y or Millennial studentsprefer shiny new technology to old-fashionedchalkboards, or that parents expect shiny newfacilities, or that colleges cling to teachingmethods that are decades out of date.Actually, it’s a bit of each, but overall it’s this:that classroom and chalkboard represent tothe young woman, her mother and anyone whovisits that classroom that it’s not ready for thekind of teaching and learning we need today.The world has changed since chalkboardscame along but the classroom hasn’t gottenthe word. Too many are not-ready-for-prime-time learning, a situation that helped inspireSteelcase to form the Education Solutionsgroup. (More on this later.)If you plan, manage or design environments,you know that environments influence behavior.So, what kind of behavior comes from thetypical, rectangular classroom (traditionalrow-by-column fixed seats, a podium, a boardbolted to the wall) found at practically everycollege, high school and elementary schoolin North America?Passive learning. Students find a seat, theteacher presents, everyone listens (more orless). Raise your hand if you have a questionbut don’t move around. And don’t expect anykind of active engagement in the process.We’ve all suffered in this kind of classroom –even slept in them, right? They’re the vestigesof a production-line approach adoptedfrom the manufacturing floor and first putin classrooms 200 years ago!Meanwhile, the world has moved on. Rotememorization doesn’t cut it anymore.Businesses need people who can solvetough problems, collaborate with others, andgenerate the new ideas and ways of thinkingthat drive innovation.Activelearning
  • 81. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 81Education itself needs innovation, and there’snever been a better time to reinvent learningand teaching than right now. Students areready for change and their parents aredemanding it; that young woman and herdaughter are not the only ones walking outon this movie.Fortunately, some educators are getting themessage, rethinking pedagogies, introducingnew concepts in instruction and studentinvolvement in the learning process. But theyneed help. They’re entering uncharted territorythat’s formed by three factors – pedagogy,technology and space. This territory is calledactive learning, and it’s the future of education.Active learning means real engagementbetween students and instructors, studentsand peers. Collaboration in pairs andsmall groups. Team projects. Studentspresenting to other students. Contentcreation and evaluation through a problem-based curriculum.Steelcase Education Solutions was createdspecifically to support these new approaches.It’s also why I left my post as chair of thedepartment of interior design fashion atRadford University to become director ofeducation environments at Steelcase,and why I’m writing this column.We’re kind of like the Lonely Planet guideto this new territory. We study educationalspaces, from secondary through higher ed,working with public and private institutionsacross North America. We’re going to schoolevery day, listening and learning, workingwith teachers, students and administrators,as well as architects and designers, to helpcreate new, innovative learning spacesthat improve learning outcomes by askingquestions such as:ê Does the space allow everyone to be seenand heard?ê Does it support the dynamic presentationof information?ê Is it designed for mentoring, apprenticeship,and assessment?ê Can the space support temporary ownershipby different classes throughout the day?ê Will it support the different rhythms ofdifferent classes – English in the morning,math in the afternoon, science later on –as well as the varied rhythms within aclass period?ê Does the space give users clear permissionto adapt the technology, tools and furnitureto the learning needs of the work they’redoing right now, and in the future?ê Does the space contributeto student success?Every school, every design firm is ata different point in understanding andembracing active learning, how it works,and what it takes in terms of pedagogy,technology and space. We’re workingto bridge the worlds of academia anddesign through a common language andby creating forums for the conversation.Using our research and insights asguides, this column is one way we’re tryingto get everyone involved. I hope you’ll jointhe conversation. Email your ideas andquestions to lscottwe@steelcase.com orLennie_SW@twitter.com.This is too important a conversation forbeing a passive note-taker.°SteelcaseeducationsolutionsActive learning:a new classroom paradigm
  • 82. 82 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comHow do you make a classroom more engagingfor both the student and the instructor?No learning space is more in need of freshdesign thinking than the classroom. Everyoneagrees it’s time to reconsider a new classroomparadigm where technology and the physicalspace are integrated to support pedagogy andcreate a more active and engaging experiencefor instructors and students.A media:scape LearnLab environmentintegrates furniture, technology and worktoolsto support a variety of teaching methods andlearning preferences. Multiple stages make iteasy for both students and instructors to sharecontent, and a unique X configuration giveseveryone clear sight lines to digital and analogcontent. Combining the innovative LearnLabdesign with media:scape has helped toreshape the ways students and educatorsthink about the classroom. It supports threedistinct modes of sharing digital content:lecture, co-creation and group share.°Classrooms for active learningObservation SolutiondesignappsDesign APPSInnovative Application IdeasFor more information on how LearnLab environmentsenhance student and faculty collaboration and learning,visit: http://www.steelcase.com/en/resources/industries/education/pages/learnlab.aspxView http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreenv=BXSFv91fFJ8 and see how media:scape LeanLabsupports multiple learning and teaching styles.
  • 83. 360.steelcase.com | Issue 63 | 83360 is ipad readYA new app for the iPad puts 360 Magazine at your fingertips.Packed with articles on the latest Steelcase workplace research,insights and trends, the digital 360 for iPad also includes exclusivevideos and slideshows.Find the “Steelcase 360” app for free on iTunes.
  • 84. 84 | Issue 63 | 360.steelcase.comÑ Designing better, togetherHow might we restore vibrancyin cities and regions facingeconomic decline? Steelcaseand OpenIDEO have presented a“challenge” to OpenIDEO’s globalcommunity of over 19,000 peoplein over 180 countries to contributetheir inspirations about whatcould be done to help restorevibrancy in challenged citiesaround the world. Togetherthey’re looking to designsolutions – from entrepreneurshipand education to communitymobilization and campaigns –that reinvigorate and help restoreareas facing economic decline,population loss, unemploymentand erosion of social/civicservices or other criticalissues. As global economiesbecome more intertwined andinterconnected, we have a uniqueopportunity to consider ways tobring vibrancy and prosperity toour own neighborhoods, townsand cities.OpenIDEO is an online platformfor creative thinkers – a placewhere people design better,together for social good. Itssuccess depends on participation– your inspirations, his comments,her concepts, our designprocess. It’s these efforts, thesebig and small moments of sharingand collaboration, that make thisplatform a dynamic resourcefor tackling significant globalchallenges. IDEO developedOpenIDEO as a way to includea broader range of peoplein the design process throughinspiration, conceptingand evaluation.For more information on howto get involved: http://www.openideo.com/open/vibrant-cities/brief.html.atomsbitsatoms + bitsÑ It’s a BoYInterior Design magazine hasawarded media:scape mini andmedia:scape mobile Best ofthe Year (BoY) Product Designhonors in the Office: Accessoriescategory. These new solutionsextend the media:scapeexperience by transforming anyexisting space into collaborativework environments.The design competitionrecognizes superior interiordesign projects and products inmore than 50 categories. Winnerswere determined by a jury ofleading architects and designers.
  • 85. Ó sparks flyThe Turnstone Design Team and BiviTMhave beenawarded a Spark! Award, an international designcompetition. Bivi is a unique benching systemthat helps workers connect to work and life.It’s targeted at small and emerging companies.The first-of-its-kind product contains an integratedRumble Seat and Hoodie and arches that supportcanopies, mountain bikes and snowboards.Bivi is designed to be the most reconfigurable,most adaptable and most affordable systemof its kind, all with the Steelcase promise of quality.Bivi also won a Best of NeoCon Gold Awardearlier this year. idea recognizes media:scapemedia:scape with HDvideoconferencing has receiveda Bronze award from theInternational Design ExcellenceAwards (IDEA), an annualcompetition that recognizesproduct designs that enhancequality of life and the economy. Ajury from the Industrial DesignersSociety of America (IDSA)chose media:scape with HDvideoconferencing as a winner inthe Office Productivity category.Founded 31 years ago, the IDEAcompetition received a recordamount of entries in 2011. Outof 524 finalists, 27 were honoredwith the Gold Award, while 68received the Silver Award and 96won the Bronze Award.atomsbits Simply the BEST!Steelcase was included among the top 10 organizations honored bythe American Society for Training and Development’s BEST awardscompetition. This honor recognizes Steelcase’s success drivinginnovation through employee training, specifically in the developmentof the node™ chair. The ASTD BEST Awards are the training industry’smost rigorous and coveted recognition.The award celebrates the yearlong research process during whichSteelcase learning professionals evaluated new design-thinkingmethodologies and developed a new Steelcase University curriculumcalled “Think” to teach employees throughout the company. The renewedinvestment in employee training has enhanced the company’s designprocess. The first product the company has brought to market followingthe implementation of this program is node™, a mobile classroomseat that supports multiple teaching styles, room configurations andstudent preferences.“This acknowledgment of our learning and development practicevalidates the guidance and investment from our CEO Jim Hackett,” saidFaye Richardson-Green, director of the Global LD Center of Expertiseand Global Talent Management Group for Steelcase Inc. “Whether it isemployee education through our Steelcase University or training on thejob, innovation is at the heart of Steelcase’s business.”
  • 86. The magazine of workplace research, insight and trends360.steelcase.com

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