Change Management for
Project Managers
A Journey Planner
October 2013

Privileged and Confidential Information
This proposal is protected under the copyright laws of the United States and other
countries as an unpublished work. This ...
Overview
•  Arguably the two greatest inventions of the 20th century
were
–  Management
–  Globalization

•  Management en...
Overview
•  Project managers are often the greatest
catalysts for change
•  Yet they are split or conflicted as to their
re...
“It is good to have an end to
journey toward; but it is the
journey that matters, in the
end.”
Ernest	
  Hemingway	
  

Pr...
JCPenney “An Unexpected Journey”
• 

Johnson not addressing anyone in
particular

• 

Those in charge of communication
(mi...
A Journey, not a Destination
•  Change Management starts at the beginning of a project
–  It needs to happen throughout th...
Growth vs. Transformation
•  There are two fundamental types of change
management projects
–  Growth
–  Transformation

• ...
Change via Constructive Disruption
•  Start with the root cause of the change
•  Technology projects are generally disrupt...
What is Constructive Disruption?
Disruption brings about the often-needed
transformation in organizations that ask
why the...
Change Enabled by Constructive Disruption
•  Uncover
–  Discover without trying to understand

•  Examine
–  Take apart an...
Phase I – Uncovering the need
•  What’s the motivation behind the change?
•  It’s almost never technology. Inspect
–  Peop...
Journey Planner
• 

Assess
–  Understand environment (People, process, behaviors, beliefs)
–  What is influencing and creat...
Change Assessment
•  Review outstanding cultural issues with members of the Management
team
•  Conduct Skill vs. Will asse...
Skill vs. Will
•  Ask “Who?” early on
•  Get to know all the users involved in
change
–  Think about it like jury selectio...
Help Users: “Where do I fit in?”
•  Change is the New Normal
•  People want to know how they remain relevant
–  Penney’s em...
Deploy Your Change Agents
•  Deploy Change Agents to work on
–  Socializing awareness and promoting change
–  Encourage be...
Chaos Group Then/Now:
Drivers of #FAIL and Success*
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

Lack of User Input
Incomplete Require...
Another Standish Group Slide

Privileged and Confidential Information

18
Develop a Semantic Map
Early stage company
–  Well-funded
–  Social Media Company
–  Well known CEO
–  Team leaders with d...
Root Cause Analysis for Change
• 

Start with Process Maps at Level 1 or 2
–  Define business needs and handoffs
between fu...
Phase II – Examine
• 

Analyze
– 

Take apart and categorize

– 

Discover elements (reduce simplest form)
• 
• 

Properti...
“Influence Only” Change
•  Have specific examples to
discuss
•  Make it about the numbers
•  Demonstrate sensitivity
•  Work...
Mapping The Change Journey
• 

Develop a set of internal themes for communicating the reasons and
measurements for change
...
Mapping The Change Journey
• 

There cannot be enough communication in a major change program
–  One of the biggest proble...
Engineer Success
•  What are the metrics?
•  Make the metrics SMARRT
–  Specific – Identify very well-defined measurements
–...
Demand
Planning

Release 1

As Required

Feature n3

Architecture
5

Architecture
n1
Emergency Release
(on standby)

Devel...
Other Components of Change
•  Tie the change initiative to the tangible
–  “Greater Good” isn’t enough
–  People want to s...
Engaging others in the Journey
Keeping change alive and on track is more difficult than simply stating the goal. It may
see...
Lessons Learned from Change Management
• 
• 
• 
• 

The journey is more important than the destination
Bad decisions can b...
Thank You!
Lawrence I Lerner, President
LERNER Consulting
lawrence@revolutionaryinnovator.com
+1.630.248.0663
@RevInnovato...
exc ellence .perspective.innov ati on.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

LERNER Change Management: A Journey Planner 10-2013

525 views
383 views

Published on

Change Management is a journey. Understanding the root cause of change and building a comprehensive plan is essential. Keeping change alive and on track is more difficult than simply stating the goal. It may seem counterintuitive but change is not self-sustaining. A plan that is equal parts roadmap, process, technology and systems with well-developed communication themes is necessary. It needs to be nurtured with active support and management guidance. If that weren’t the case, incumbents would always be re-elected.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
525
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
55
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

LERNER Change Management: A Journey Planner 10-2013

  1. 1. Change Management for Project Managers A Journey Planner October 2013 Privileged and Confidential Information
  2. 2. This proposal is protected under the copyright laws of the United States and other countries as an unpublished work. This proposal contains information that is proprietary and confidential to LERNER Consulting, llc, which shall not be disclosed outside the recipient’s company or duplicated, used or disclosed in whole or in part by the recipient of any purpose other than to evaluate this proposal. Any other use or disclosure in whole or in part of this information without the express written permission of LERNER Consulting, llc is prohibited. 2011 LERNER Consulting, llc (unpublished). All rights reserved. Privileged and Confidential Information 1
  3. 3. Overview •  Arguably the two greatest inventions of the 20th century were –  Management –  Globalization •  Management enabled us to run businesses in multiple locations and geographies •  Globalization changed the way we interact, purchase and think about Supply Chains •  Technology comes into play and is successful because of the role it plays as a change agent •  These are the catalysts to “Projects” and the change they create Privileged and Confidential Information 2
  4. 4. Overview •  Project managers are often the greatest catalysts for change •  Yet they are split or conflicted as to their responsibility •  Change activities must go hand-in-hand with Delivery elements –  Run them in parallel •  Not all projects are right for a full Change Management program Privileged and Confidential Information 3
  5. 5. “It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” Ernest  Hemingway   Privileged and Confidential Information 4
  6. 6. JCPenney “An Unexpected Journey” •  Johnson not addressing anyone in particular •  Those in charge of communication (middle managers, PR, Marketing) removed before a new strategy was put in place Media is highly critical but no responses from management “Lurching” within the strategy •  •  •  Think of yourselves as the CEO of your project Privileged and Confidential Information 5
  7. 7. A Journey, not a Destination •  Change Management starts at the beginning of a project –  It needs to happen throughout the project and measured for effectiveness –  If you bring it in during the project, you must overcome •  Objections •  Habits that have already formed •  The Status Quo •  Listen –  “I don’t know what’s going on but what I hear isn’t good” –  “I thought you meant…” •  It important to use what you pick up and learn along the way •  Needs change, events happen, priorities shift –  Having a route to your destination allows for course corrections •  The problem with JCPenney’s change was not setting the expectation of shoppers –  Worked for Apple stores because technology is change –  Clothing is not Privileged and Confidential Information 6
  8. 8. Growth vs. Transformation •  There are two fundamental types of change management projects –  Growth –  Transformation •  Growth –  Adds to the way we are doing things •  Transformation –  Change the way we are doing something in holistic fashion •  Both require resetting of expectations –  Inform and mange your stakeholders, team and end-users Privileged and Confidential Information 7
  9. 9. Change via Constructive Disruption •  Start with the root cause of the change •  Technology projects are generally disruptive in nature. –  They break the status quo in order to enable advances Privileged and Confidential Information 8
  10. 10. What is Constructive Disruption? Disruption brings about the often-needed transformation in organizations that ask why the status quo isn’t achieving their goals. Constructive is the well-laid out journey to growth or transformation. Privileged and Confidential Information 9
  11. 11. Change Enabled by Constructive Disruption •  Uncover –  Discover without trying to understand •  Examine –  Take apart and understand the need •  Prepare –  Develop a solution and material that supports the need •  Satisfy –  Present the solution to the need •  Active/Passive Learning –  Supporting process through knowledge acquisition Privileged and Confidential Information 10
  12. 12. Phase I – Uncovering the need •  What’s the motivation behind the change? •  It’s almost never technology. Inspect –  People –  Process –  (Operational) Systems •  Healthcare Exchanges •  Loan Origination –  Economic •  Can you identify the themes? –  Regulatory or compliance needs –  “We need to grow market share” –  “Too much waste in our product development initiatives” Privileged and Confidential Information 11
  13. 13. Journey Planner •  Assess –  Understand environment (People, process, behaviors, beliefs) –  What is influencing and creating the need? –  What are analogies from like problems in other areas? –  How does the organization behave under change? •  Observe –  Listen “Don’t arrive before you get there” Lesson #26 –  Question –  Interact (Be here; now) •  Organize –  Develop a vocabulary –  Create a matrix of what was uncovered –  Build a Semantic Map of opinions, beliefs with examples –  What is unexplored? –  What don’t you know? •  Don’t make any judgments, yet Privileged and Confidential Information 12
  14. 14. Change Assessment •  Review outstanding cultural issues with members of the Management team •  Conduct Skill vs. Will assessments •  Interview project participants to understand their perspective •  Identify change agents and candidates for re-purposing amongst the groups –  Work with them to understand and address cultural issues •  Develop action plans to address the issues •  Place emphasis on those areas felt to be most at risk through –  communications, –  training, –  tangible performance metrics, –  incentives –  and penalties. Privileged and Confidential Information 13
  15. 15. Skill vs. Will •  Ask “Who?” early on •  Get to know all the users involved in change –  Think about it like jury selection •  Identify the “WIFM” –  “What’s in it for me” •  Don’t under estimate emotional investment or intelligence •  Understand user sentiment Privileged and Confidential Information 14
  16. 16. Help Users: “Where do I fit in?” •  Change is the New Normal •  People want to know how they remain relevant –  Penney’s employees didn’t know where they fit in the new order –  Customers were confused –  Inadequate communication and communication mechanisms to the new customers •  Help the users with “Where do I fit in?” –  Audience engagement – Empower, guide and reward –  Training –  Role re/definition –  Timing Privileged and Confidential Information 15
  17. 17. Deploy Your Change Agents •  Deploy Change Agents to work on –  Socializing awareness and promoting change –  Encourage behaviors that support new systems –  Gaining a breakthrough in knowledge –  Alter the current mode of thinking Privileged and Confidential Information 16
  18. 18. Chaos Group Then/Now: Drivers of #FAIL and Success* 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  Lack of User Input Incomplete Requirements Changing Requirements Lack of Executive Support Technology Incompetence Lack of Resources Unrealistic Expectations Unclear Objectives 9.  Unrealistic Time Frames 10.  New Technology 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  Direct User Input Prioritized Requirements Aligned Requirements Clear Executive Support The Right Technical Skills Effective Resourcing Aligned Expectations Aligned Objectives 9.  Credible Delivery Plan 10.  Current Technical Skills, Architectures and Frameworks *The  Standish  Group  1994,  2004   Privileged and Confidential Information 17
  19. 19. Another Standish Group Slide Privileged and Confidential Information 18
  20. 20. Develop a Semantic Map Early stage company –  Well-funded –  Social Media Company –  Well known CEO –  Team leaders with deep domain experience What the CEO said What the Team said Privileged and Confidential Information 19
  21. 21. Root Cause Analysis for Change •  Start with Process Maps at Level 1 or 2 –  Define business needs and handoffs between functional units •  “Run the business” – Level 3 and Level 4 maps –  Define responsibility at the individual role level •  Identify how specific business processes will be integrated near and long term 1.  Help improve communication and understanding 2.  Define hand-offs between groups 3.  Define roles and responsibilities of the groups during project initiation phase Best practice: 90% Process 10% Common Sense 4.  Define workflows 5.  Indicate control points, where applicable Identify the groups involved Privileged and Confidential Information 20
  22. 22. Phase II – Examine •  Analyze –  Take apart and categorize –  Discover elements (reduce simplest form) •  •  Properties •  –  Methods Attributes Discover relationships in simplest form •  Isolate and address issues •  Re-organize –  –  •  Refine vocabulary and system of classification (taxonomy) Refine relationship map (semantic map) Exercise parts of the need –  –  Example consistency in context of larger scope –  Examine outcomes –  •  Examine for consistency in statements, processes and elements (are they in simplest form possible) in context of problem statement Observe and record Research –  Find related or useful data, information and beliefs –  Find related and undiscovered parts of the need –  Combine with data/elements previously discovered Privileged and Confidential Information 21
  23. 23. “Influence Only” Change •  Have specific examples to discuss •  Make it about the numbers •  Demonstrate sensitivity •  Work backwards from dates and milestones •  Behavior change is a lot like marketing Themes&heard&most&o,en& We’re&like&three&different& companies& We&have&no&direc7on&from& execu7ve&leadership& Priori7es&change&almost&daily& We&have&no&technical&direc7on& I&love&this&company&and&its&poten7al& –  It requires reinforcement –  Frequent messaging Privileged and Confidential Information 22
  24. 24. Mapping The Change Journey •  Develop a set of internal themes for communicating the reasons and measurements for change •  •  All communications should be based and revolve around these central themes Identify three to five core measurements by which everything is driven. Sample: 1.  Reduction of defects –> Reduce/remove business impact of defects in Production 2.  Overall productivity improvements in SDLC = Improvements in Development + QA 3.  Improved responsiveness to business needs 4.  Measurably better use of IT resources 5.  Process improvements •  •  Identify different stakeholder and ‘at-risk’ groups and develop tailored messages Utilize multi-modal communications (presentations, meetings, memos, website, FAQs) Privileged and Confidential Information 23
  25. 25. Mapping The Change Journey •  There cannot be enough communication in a major change program –  One of the biggest problems is ensuring an adequate amount of communications •  Make sure that communications are always two-way –  Listen to the feedback and loop it back into the process Privileged and Confidential Information 24
  26. 26. Engineer Success •  What are the metrics? •  Make the metrics SMARRT –  Specific – Identify very well-defined measurements –  Measureable – If you cannot measure, you cannot manage –  Reasonable – It must be within the capabilities and reach of the team –  Reliable – Are the metrics persistent? –  Timely – Pick a frequency (monthly) that’s appropriate (monthly) •  Engage your Change Agents •  Improve your hindsight 20/20. Six months after we go live –  Finish this statement “I am glad we did this for the following reasons” •  1 •  2 •  3 Privileged and Confidential Information 25
  27. 27. Demand Planning Release 1 As Required Feature n3 Architecture 5 Architecture n1 Emergency Release (on standby) Developers, Analysts and Tester Developers, Analysts and Tester Privileged and Confidential Information Developers, Analysts and Tester User Stories Architects, Analysts and Tester Delivery Coach Product Owner Feature6 Architecture 4 NFRs/Security Feature n2 User Stories Release Manager(s) Feature n1 Feature5 Feature3 Architecture 3 Release n Feature4 Feature2 Architecture 2 Architect Roadmap Release 2 Feature1 Technical Stories Product Backlog Product Owner(s) Architecture Portfolio Objective Feature/Function Program/Release Design Pattern Release 0 Agile Teams Framework Architecture 1 Business Priorities Business Vision User Stories Program Backlog Compliance/ Regulatory Planning Business Owners Business Value Business Portfolio Agile Portfolio Model 26
  28. 28. Other Components of Change •  Tie the change initiative to the tangible –  “Greater Good” isn’t enough –  People want to see you/us succeed •  Don’t problem solve alone –  Fix the process not the steps Privileged and Confidential Information 27
  29. 29. Engaging others in the Journey Keeping change alive and on track is more difficult than simply stating the goal. It may seem counterintuitive but change is not self-sustaining. A plan that is equal parts roadmap, process, technology and systems with well-developed communication themes is necessary. It needs to be nurtured with active support and management guidance. If that weren’t the case, incumbents would always be re-elected. •  Take the time to do your journey planning first and completely. –  While there may be detours in the road, a well thought out plan helps you to journey’s end •  Create a set of external themed communications and have all of your plans driven from there •  From those themes identify five key metrics to judge success. If you cannot do that you will never know how close you are to journey’s end •  Today’s employees use many modes of communication! –  Mirror them with websites, brown bag lunches, –  FAQs –  Internal tweet(s)-of-the-day •  Identify different stakeholder and ‘at-risk’ groups and develop tailored messages –  All stakeholders must have “a seat at the table.” Ensure you know who they are Privileged and Confidential Information 28
  30. 30. Lessons Learned from Change Management •  •  •  •  The journey is more important than the destination Bad decisions can be reversed, slow decisions sow doubt Know how your corporate culture thrives during change Be firm but not aggressive –  When push comes to shove, management must be willing to step in and do what’s necessary •  Be sensitive to middle management, they have it coming from both sides •  Mean what you say, say what you mean •  Say it all or not at all Privileged and Confidential Information 29
  31. 31. Thank You! Lawrence I Lerner, President LERNER Consulting lawrence@revolutionaryinnovator.com +1.630.248.0663 @RevInnovator Privileged and Confidential Information
  32. 32. exc ellence .perspective.innov ati on.

×