120511Iasi Dynamic river management Hendrik Havinga

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Dynamic River Management: Targets and consequences

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120511Iasi Dynamic river management Hendrik Havinga

  1. 1. Thinktank River Engineering TUDDynamic River ManagementTargets and consequences June 24 2002 1
  2. 2. Definition of DynamicRivermanagement (DRM)• Dynamic Rivermanagement : River lay-out and management for functions flood protection and navigation should offer conditions for recovery of hydro-morphological resilience: System can return to original equilibrium: thus attenuation of floodwaves, higher low water stages, halt to bed degradation Nature values are automatically restored ! 2
  3. 3. :Dynamic River Management:Counteracting negative effects ofregulation measures- General: small-scale measures without distant respons (in x and t), so flexibel and reversible 3
  4. 4. Floodplain of Rhine River near Karlsruhe 4
  5. 5. Restoring small stream the “Sandbach” near Iffezheim 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. Also in the Dutch river “Geul” 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. Increasing flow conveyance : The Gameren floodplain June 2000 9
  10. 10. Upstream viewSouth and East channels 10
  11. 11. Downstream view South and West channels 11
  12. 12. Secondary channels and morphology 12
  13. 13. 13
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. Consequences of “repair” measures• Abundant vegetation in the floodplains, dynamic changes• correction measures have to be carried out at irregular times.• River management has to be able to track the (dynamic) changes in the river system, forecasts the impact on different user-interests, formulate strategies to cope with the changes and finally (if needed) to execute short-term measures. 15
  16. 16. Dynamic Rivermanagement System• Elements are various quick-scan monitoring systems: - multi-beam sounding methods - laser-altimetry for changes in topography and vegetation patterns - radar-reflection of waterlevels to detect changes in waterdepth (and bedlevels) - satelite imaging 16
  17. 17. Multibeam image of armoured layer 17
  18. 18. Multibeam image of ds. end of armoured layer 18
  19. 19. Relation between vegetation andhydraulic roughness 19
  20. 20. wilgenstruweel 20 18 [m1/2/s] 16 14Resistance of willows 12 Chézy coëfficiënt 10 8 6 4 2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 waterdepth [m]
  21. 21. Origin of hydraulic roughnessVegetation type roughness h roughness Av
  22. 22. LANDSAT 22
  23. 23. Remote sensing voorbeelden: CASI 23
  24. 24. detailbushes Height with help of Laseraltimetry 24
  25. 25. Laseraltimetrie •NAP – hoogte (± 5 cm) •RD – coördinaten (± 2 cm) •Intensiteit •Minimaal 4 metingen/m2inleiding weerstand lopend onderzoek hoe verder
  26. 26. 3D imageinleiding weerstand lopend onderzoek hoe verder
  27. 27. Vegetation height Hoogte op lijn door proefgebiedje 30 25 Hoogte tov NAP 20 15 10 5 170220 170240 170260 170280 170300 170320 170340 Hoogte op lijn door proefgebiedje 30 25 hoogte tov NAP 20 15 10 5 170220 170240 170260 170280 170300 170320 170340inleiding weerstand lopend onderzoek hoe verder 27
  28. 28. Roughness map Duursche Waarden ’97inleiding weerstand lopend onderzoek hoe verder
  29. 29. DRM: Consequences for day to day management• Dealing with uncertainties – more morpho-dynamics – more interaction with terrain-owners• Organisational modifications• Introduction and implementation of high-tech monitoring systems and DSS 29
  30. 30. That’s all ! 30

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