• Save
Resourcd File
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Resourcd File

on

  • 36 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
36
Views on SlideShare
36
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Resourcd File Resourcd File Presentation Transcript

  • A2 Child Scheme of Learning NB: This SoL is a working document. It should be altered as appropriate by the class teacher. The teacher should also incorporate DIRT Time and completion of progress trackers after assessments/essays have been completed. Teachers may also want to add a ‘Getting to Know You’ lesson with new classes. Please also make use of Examiner’s Reports and Tutor/Teacher support materials, which can be accessed by the Edexcel website. Exam Q: Can be completed in the lesson or set for homework and then PA/SA in lessons. For A Level it is important for students to get used what ‘good’ exam answers look like, particularly the 12 markers. Please make use of exemplar answers and feedback from examiner’s reports in lessons. These can be found alongside past-papers on the Edexcel website. It’s good practice to allow students to mark these answers themselves using the mark scheme, before comparing to the examiner’s mark and comments. This can be done during essay feedback/DIRT lessons. Students should also improve all of their written essays and assessments in line with the mark scheme. This can also be set for homework. Studies and research evidence for Cognitive Psychology: The studies we have chosen to use as AO2 evaluation of theories are highlighted in green throughout the specification. Subject: Psychology: Child Psychology (Unit 3) Year: 13 Allocated time/No. of lessons: Approximately 21 Lessons Lesson No. Differentiated Learning Objectives Success Criteria Differentiated activities which promote active independent learning AFL strategies / feedback & dialogue Links to RWCM Homework 1 Big Q: What is Child Psychology? To UNDERSTAND what child psychology is And why it is studied by psychologists. To APPLY child psychology to examples of development. To EVALUATE the usefulness of child psychology. To identify and describe what we will look at in child psychology using key terms. To explain some examples of what child psychologists might be interested in. To explain how useful child psychology is in understanding Introduction to Child Psychology Starter: Getting students thinking. Ask: What might child psychology be about? Why is it important for Psychologists? Get students to discuss. Targeted feedback of ideas. Outline big question: What is Child Psychology and how useful is it? Students to set own success criteria based on the skills. E.g. ‘Understand: By the end of the lesson I will be able to explain features of child psychology.’ Explain that child psychology is also known as ‘developmental psychology.’ It is interested in Interested in how and why we develop as we do. It Looks into mental and behavioural processes and how they change. Changes occur over a person’s lifetime as a result of inherited factors or lifetime experiences (nature/nurture). Show object permanence clip as an introduction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKZ9IPRKkkU&feature=PlayList&p=083DA53659F Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. W: Written tasks C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Child Psychology
  • behaviour, in terms of strengths and weaknesses. CD51E&playnext_from=PL&index=3 From the clip ask students what milestones in development this child might have already achieved? How developed is she? As students to discuss and come up with a list of all the aspects of development a child psychologist might study. Questioning to elicit feedback. Touch on each of the following areas. What do the students think they mean? Can they think of an example of a developmental milestone for each? - Cognitive Development - Language Development - Moral Development - Personality Development - Social/Emotional Development Get students to complete 1-3 tasks depending on their LO. Choice of tasks… 1) Remember: Define all key terms we have looked at so far. 2) Understand: Explain what child psychology is and why it is interesting/important to psychologists. 3) Apply: Outline some examples of what behaviour child psychologists investigate. 4) Analyse: How does child psychology compare to the psychological approaches we studied at last year? 5) Evaluate: How useful is child psychology at understanding behaviour? Think strengths and weaknesses. For the evaluation section one strength is that it is easily applicable to real life. However a weakness would be that it focuses too much on child maturity, which is only one stage of human behaviour. Students should also think about how it relates to nature/nurture. Do they think it looks at upbringing or biology or both? Why? Plenary: Tweet summaries. Students should summarise child psychology in less than 140 characters. Can be hidden or can be posted on the padlet wall using their smartphones. http://padlet.com/charlotte_russe/cr_aspsych scheme. 2 Big Q: What is attachment and how important is it to development? To UNDERSTAND To define attachment. To explain real life examples of Attachment: !!! Before you start this topic explain that this topic may be sensitive for some so students should respect others and contribute with some degree of sensitivity. To start: Why do we find babies cute? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks C:
  • what is attachment. To APPLY attachment to real life examples. To ANALYSE attachments in children and animals. To EVALUATE the importance of attachments. attachments. To compare and contrast human and animal attachments by explaining the similarities and differences. To explain how important attachments are by considering the effects. Targeted feedback. Encourage students to think about why on the whole, humans as a species are drawn to babies. Play clip as an introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rALJido4iI Ask students what this video suggests? Come to the conclusion that babies cuteness is adaptive and this leads us to form attachments… lead onto the big question/focus of today’s lesson. Outline of big question: ‘What is attachment and how important is it to development?’ Students to set their own success criteria based on the skills. E.g. Apply: By the end of the lesson I will explain real life examples of attachment.’ Main Tasks: Play two videos. While they are watching the videos ask students to consider what attachment really is? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cSJHtatBGQ http://www.babycenter.com/2_creating-an-attachment-with-your-baby_ 10350318.bc Students to feedback their ideas on what is an attachment. After questioning students, present the definition: “An affectional tie that one person or animal forms between himself and another specific one – a tie that binds them together in space and endures over time. This usually develops around 7 months old.” Students should now reflect on their own attachments and should personally write down their answers to the following questions: - When you were a child who did you love? Who did you have an attachment with? Why was this attachment important? - What would happen if this person wasn’t there and you were separated from them? - Do you still have an attachment to this person? Why? - As you have grown up have you formed attachments to anyone else? - What is the main attachment you have formed in your life so far? feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. Communication of idea /discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  • Targeted feedback and questioning. Teacher to probe for more information using ‘Why?’ ‘How?’ ‘What does this tell us about attachment then?’ Following the feedback explain that the main attachment babies develop is one with a primary caregiver – usually the mother. This is to ensure the baby’s safety and security and to ensure its needs are met. Separation anxiety occurs when the baby is separated from the primary caregiver – usually resulting in crying. Display a picture of a baby, a goose and genie, followed by the two questions. - How do attachments compare between babies and animals? What is similar/different and what does this tell us about attachment? - How important is attachment to our development/behaviour? What happens if attachments are disrupted? Students to discuss with the person next to them and generate ideas. These ideas could be taken from the video clips watched. Targeted feedback: Teacher to question one pair of students. Once they have answered they must nominate another pair to feedback. This pair should contribute another idea and nominate another pair and so on.. Outline key ideas of Imprinting, Deprivation & Privation. Plenary: Fill in Freud: Students to pass the Freud doll around. When each student is holding Freud they must explain one thing they have learned about attachment this lesson. Their contribution must include one of the following key words: - Attachment - Imprinting - Separation Anxiety - Bond - Deprivation - Privation That person should nominate another student to answer and pass the Freud doll to them. 3 – 5 Big Q: What are the methods used in child psychology and how useful are they? To UNDERSTAND the methods used To describe each method used in child psychology. To explain an example of how each method could Research Methods in Child Psychology Starter: What do you think is the research method most used in Child Psychology to study the development of children? Why? Targeted feedback. Teacher to ask for justification. Outline big question: ‘What are the methods used in child psychology and how useful are they for investigating it?’ Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions R: Research – reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks C: Presentation
  • in Child Psychology. To APPLY methods for use in child psychology To ANALYSE which methods are best for studying child psychology. To EVALUATE methods used in Child Psychology. be used to study attachment. To compare and contrast methods and explain which method is best for studying child psychology. To explain the strengths and weaknesses of each method. Students to set their own success criteria from the skills. E.g. ‘Evaluate: By the end of the lesson I will be able to explain the strengths and weaknesses of methods used in child psychology.’ Main Activities: Explain that there are 4 methods used primarily to study the development of children: - Observations - Case Studies - Longitudinal Studies - Cross Cultural Research. Students split into 4 groups based on ability level. Each group allocated a research method. Students to produce a presentation/mini lesson lasting approximately 15 - 20 minutes on their method. They will present this next lesson to the class. They must ensure that each member of the class has a set of notes to take away for revision. They must consider each of the skills: - Understand: What is the method? How does it work? What does it involve? - Apply: How can it be used to study child psychology? For example how would a psychologist use this method to investigate attachment? Are there any real life examples of studies on child development which have used this method? - Evaluate: How useful is the method on the whole? What are its strengths and weaknesses? How useful is it for studying child psychology and attachment? How accurate would the findings be? Encourage students to be creative. If they are conducting a mini lesson they should consider activities and assessment. Each group to present their method. Teacher to facilitate and extend learning through questioning. Plenary: Analyse. Each student to write down which method they think is the best to study child development and why? Teacher to encourage comparisons between the 4 methods. E.g. ‘Why is a longitudinal study better than an observation for studying children?’ with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. skills, discussion and verbal feedback throughout. 6 Big Q: What are the methods used in child psychology and how useful are To describe each method used in child psychology. Methods in Child Psychology Exam Practice Starter: Recap methods from last lesson. Match method to the definition. Higher abilities should match the method to the evaluation point. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student R: Reading and comprehending exam questions and mark Homework: Students should individually
  • they? To UNDERSTAND the methods used in Child Psychology. To APPLY methods for use in child psychology To ANALYSE which methods are best for studying child psychology. To EVALUATE methods used in Child Psychology. To explain an example of how each method could be used to study attachment. To compare and contrast methods and explain which method is best for studying child psychology. To explain the strengths and weaknesses of each method. Outline of big question: What are the methods used in child psychology and how useful are they? Students to set LO’s similar to before. Main tasks Display a number of exam questions around the room on big pieces of paper. Students split into groups based on ability level. Each group should spend approximately 2-3 minutes on each question. Each group should start writing an answer to the first question. After 2-3 minutes they should move around to the next one. On arriving at the next one they should add or improve the answer that has already been started by a previous group. Groups should carry on moving around until they end up at their original question. Questions as follows:  January 2010: Evaluate the structured observational research method in terms of one strength and one weakness. (4 marks)  January 2011: Explain one strength of using a longitudinal research method. ( 2 marks) Explain one weakness of using a longitudinal research method. (2 marks)  January 2013: Describe the structured observation research method as it is used to study the behaviour of children. You must refer to children’s behaviour in your answer. (4 marks).  January 2013: Evaluate the structured observation research method. In your answer make at least one comparison point with the naturalistic observation research method. (5 marks).  (June 2012): After conducting his research, Ben’s findings in one culture led him to want to investigate further. He decided to focus on that particular culture and to use a longitudinal research method. Explain the issues that Ben might have when investigating children’s behaviour using a longitudinal research method. (4 marks). When students have arrived back at the question they started with they should now read the improvements/final answer. They should reflect on what has changed and whether it was an improvement. Give students a copy of the mark scheme for their question. Get them to assess it against the mark scheme and give it a mark. Students to feedback. Each group to read out their question, the answer written down and the mark they awarded it. Teacher to prompt student’s thinking by asking Why? Students should be able to explain the mark they have given by referring back to the mark scheme. Students should now pick one of the other questions (other than the one their group started with) and practise individually answering this. When they have finished they Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. schemes. W: Written answers to exam questions C: Group work, verbal feedback and discussion throughout. write an answer to a 6 mark question. (June 2013) The case study is a research method used to study the development of children in detail. Explain the validity and relibility issues associated with the case study research method in child psychology. (6 marks).
  • should Self Assess. Plenary: Having heard all of the questions and answers, students should now come up with 3 top tips for applying their knowledge to methods questions. Students to feedback via targeted questioning. 7-8 Big Q: How does Bowlby explain Attachment? To UNDERSTAND the main concepts of Bowlby’s theory of attachment. To APPLY these concepts to explaining attachment. To ANALYSE Bowlby’s approach to attachment. To EVALUATE Bowlby’s theory of attachment. To explain the main key terms and concepts of Bowlby’s theory To explain how these concepts explain attachment. To compare Bowlby’s approach to other psychological approaches by explaining similarities and differences. To explain the strengths, weaknesses and evidence for Bowlby’ theory. Bowlby: Evolutionary Theory of Attachment Starter: Re-Cap. Attachment? What is it again? Why is it important? Students to discuss and feedback. Outline of big question: ‘How does Bowlby explain attachment?’ Students to set their own learning objectives/success. Students should be made aware that this will take 2 lessons. Main Activities: Ask students what is evolution and how might it explain our early childhood attachments? Students to discuss in pairs/groups. Targeted feedback. Teacher to ask How and Why? Explain that Bowlby came up with a theory of attachment which was based on evolution. He observed and interviewed children and their families who were separated in the aftermath of WW2. These studies were often conducted in hospitals and institutions. Explain that it is the student’s job to find out exactly what he found… Students given a list of Bowlby’s concepts blanked out. E.g. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Students should conduct a hunt for these topics to fulfil the remember, understand and apply skills. Students must locate the relevant concept (remember), explain it (understand) and give an example of how it explains attachment (apply). They must do this in as much detail as they can. Students could do this using the book/internet or alternatively a number of QR codes could be produced which link to websites of use. Students can scan these using their smart phones and research the concepts that way. Blanked out concepts to be used: Monotropy, Proximity Promoting, Internal Working Model, Maternal Deprivation, and Affectionless Psychopathy. Students then placed into groups of mixed abilities. These groups must feedback to each other what they have found verbally. This should enable all students to add to their findings and produced the most detailed picture of Bowby’s attachment theory that they can. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  • Whole class feedback. Teacher to target students and question to deepen understanding. What is this concept? What does it mean? How does Bowlby use it to explain attachment? Why is it important? Explain that evolutionary theories of attachment are sometimes called ‘cupboard love’ theories. Ask students why this might be..? Student’s given outline of studies: Harlow & Harlow (1962), Lorenz (1935): imprinting, & Bowlby’s (1946), Juvenile Thieves. In groups students should read the studies and decide whether they support or contradict Bowlby’s theory and why? Students to feedback: Students then consider how Bowlby’s theory can be evaluated thinking back to their own attachments. Lower abilities given set of prompts/questions to help them. Plenary: How does Bowlby’s theory compare/fit with the 5 psychological approaches we studied last year? (Biological, Psychodynamic, Learning, Social & Cognitive). Peer discussion. Students should summarise similarities/differences and which approach the theory takes on. Students to justify their decisions. And/Or Students to individually answer the following exam question: Jan 2011: John Bowlby conducted research on children who had lost their parents during World War 2. He developed a theory of maternal deprivation. Explain Bowlby’s maternal deprivation hypothesis. (3 marks) Self assess/peer assess using mark scheme. 9 Big Q: What is Bowlby’s study of 44 Juvenile Thieves? To UNDERSTAND the aim, method, procedure, findings and conclusion of Bowlby’s Juvenile Thieves study. To EVALUATE Bowlby’s study. To APPLY knowledge of To explain the APFC of Bowlby’s study. To explain strengths and weaknesses of Bowlby’s study. To write a planned answer to an exam question on Bowlby’s study. Bowlby’s Juvenile Thieves (1946): Key Study & Exam Plan Starter: Picture of a thief on the board. What is the link between this and attachment? Students to think, pair, share and feedback. Outline of big question: What is Bowlby’s study of 44 Juvenile Thieves? Students to set their own learning objectives/success criteria. Main Activities: Show first part of video clip as a re-cap. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoIyrv5GPUc&list=PL0ECF5D1A5EAC9E8D What does this study suggest/show about attachment? Students to fill out APFC sheet/grid of the study. They must know this in detail. Use textbook for help. In groups students to try and evaluate the study using the GRAVE format (without Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. W: Written tasks, APFC grid and exam answer. C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of results from study. Homework: Complete the Q Jan (2010) Describe & Evaluate Bowlby’s Theory of Attachment (12 marks).
  • Bowlby’s study to an exam question. textbooks! Give lower abilities key questions/prompts to help their evaluation. One student from each group (lead learner) to visit each group in sequence and share their ideas for evaluation. In turn the group contributes their ideas to the lead learner from the other group. Lead learner spends 3-5 minutes at each group before moving to the next one. Lead learner returns to original group and explains anything new they have learned from visiting the other groups. What? So What However? When teacher asks: - What? – Student identifies an evaluation point. - So What? – Student explains it – What’s the issue? Why is it a strength/weakness? - However – Student presents an alternative viewpoint (usually something contrasting the first one!). Process starts again… Extension: If time allows… using mark scheme, students to plan out an essay answer to ‘Describe and Evaluate Bowlby’s study of 44 Juvenile Thieves.’ (12 marks). Run through plans with reference to command words/AO1/AO2 as a class. Plenary: Bowlby’s 44 Thieves Cryptogram/Quiz. Homework: Set alternative ‘Describe & Evaluate’ question on Bowlby’s attachment theory. Reference to mark scheme. 10 Big Q: What is Ainsworth’s Strange Situation? To UNDERSTAND Ainsworth’s Strange Situation study and types of attachment. To APPLY Ainsworth’s types of attachment to examples. To ANALYSE Ainsworth’s types To describe the strange situation study and types of attachment. To explain an example of each type of attachment. To compare types of attachments in terms of similarities and differences. To explain strengths and weaknesses of Ainsworth: Strange Situation Starter: How possible is it to measure attachments? Students to discuss and feedback. Outline of big question: ‘What is Ainsworth’s Strange Situation?’ Students to set their own success criteria/learning objectives. Show clip of the strange situation experiment (From 4mins – approx. 11 mins). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HG05AIlH6Y Ask students what this clip shows about attachment? Students can either: Understand: Create a storyboard of the experiment from start to finish. This must include findings and explanation of attachment types found. Or they can complete a similar task using Ainsworth worksheet. Verbal feedback from students after completion of tasks. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of results.
  • of attachment. To EVALUATE Ainsworth’s strange situation study and types of attachment. the strange situation study and types of attachments. Play clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6QtuU1L_A8&NR=1 Ask students how we might use this clip to evaluate Ainsworth’s strange situation? E.g. Ignores separation anxiety between child and fathers. Ainsworth predominantly tested mothers and their children. Students to choose 1-2 of the following tasks to complete based on their LO. Analyse: How do each of the attachment types compare? What are their similarities and differences? Analyse: How does Ainsworth’s study compare to Bowlby’s theory? Evaluate: How can Ainsworth’s study be evaluated in terms of GRAVE? Evaluate: How can Ainsworth’ types of attachment be evaluated? Targeted questioning and feedback on ideas. Plenary: Students to create a short answer exam question and mark scheme on Ainsworth’s Strange Situation. If time permits, swap and answer each other’s. Reference to mark scheme. 11 Big Q: How does attachment differ across cultures? To UNDERSTAND patterns of attachment across cultures. To APPLY cross cultural attachment types to examples. To ANALYSE cross cultural attachment types. To EVALUATE cross cultural research into attachment types. To describe trends and patterns of cross cultural attachment. To explain examples of cross cultural attachments. To compare cross cultural attachments by explaining similarities and differences. To explain strengths and weaknesses of cross cultural research into attachment. Cross Cultural Variations in Attachment Starter: Consider you’re upbringing. What could make your upbringing different to someone else’s? How might this have impacted on your attachment style? Feedback and discussion. Outline of big question: How does attachment differ across cultures? Students to set their own success criteria/lesson objective. Main Activities: Ask students what is culture? What does it incorporate? How does it impact on our lives? What are the different types of culture? Application to attachment: Research task. Students to research cross cultural variation in attachment. They are given the countries Israel, Germany, Japan and the names: Sagi et al (1991), Grossman et al (1985), Miyake et al. (1985) and Ijendoorn & Kroonenberg (1988). They must structure their research according to the following skills: Understand: What are the patterns of attachments across cultures? What research has been conducted to research these patterns? Apply: Give examples of attachments styles in different cultures and explain why they exist in those cultures. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension during research task. W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of cross cultural trends and statistics. June (2011) Rebecca and her one year old child participated in a child psychology study using the strange situation procedure. Her child was assessed as being securely attached. Her friend, who also had a small child, lived in a different country and Rebecca wondered if they were also securely
  • Analyse: How do attachment styles compare and contrast across cultures? What are the similarities and differences? Evaluation: What are the issues with using cross cultural research to study attachment? They may use either the textbook and/or the computers in the 6th form to do their research. Feedback: Class discussion. Teacher to ask questions tailored to the skills. Also use springboard questioning to jump from one student to the other. How far do you agree with this? Did you find anything different? How? Plenary Discuss the exam question for homework. Students to think about what they could include. Application of knowledge. attached. Using the work of Ainsworth, describe the behaviour that Rebecca’s child might show, and explain cross-cultural issues regarding child-rearing styles.(12 marks) 12 Big Q: How does deprivation affect development? To UNDERSTAND deprivation and research into deprivation. To APPLY deprivation research to the consequences of deprivation. To ANALYSE different types of deprivation. To EVALUATE the effects of deprivation and CREATE strategies to reduce these effects. To describe deprivation and research into deprivation. To explain the consequences/effec ts of deprivation. To explain similarities and differences between different types of deprivation. To explain strengths and weaknesses of the effects deprivation and suggest strategies to reduce these effects. Deprivation Starter: Link to Learning: What did Bowlby say about deprivation? Students to think and then share with the class. Re-cap on Maternal Deprivation hypothesis. Draw out verbal answers. What actually is deprivation in terms of attachment then? Explain that deprivation is the loss of a formed attachment between a child and a caregiver. Outline big Q: ‘How does deprivation affect development?’ Students to set their own LO/SC. Main Activities: Ask: Why is it important to study deprivation? Why might children suffer from deprivation? How does maternal/paternal deprivation come about? Why might they lose an attachment? Elicit verbal feedback and prompt class discussion. (Students to brainstorm possibilities, e.g. divorce, death, abuse, institutionalisation, care home). Students to rank each situation in terms of the effects – from most detrimental to less detrimental. Elicit verbal feedback encouraging them to justify their decisions. Ask.. Why? Try to draw out the difference between short term and long term deprivation. Give students outline of Robertson and Robertson’s study and worksheet. Cases of each child should be pinned around the classroom. Students to move around the cases and fill out the grid profile of each. Ask students what is similar/different about each case? What are the consequences? Do they all react in the same way? Could create a venn diagram of the 3 cases for comparison. Elicit verbal feedback and ideas – lead into class discussion. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Think, pair, share activity. Tracey Beaker is known for losing her attachment to her mum. Watch the clip https://www.y outube.com/w atch?edit=vd& v=YLMlz6fzbok and write a report on the effects of deprivation you can see in Tracey, You should include: What effects she displays and why? Suggestions for what could be done to prevent/reduc e these effects in the future. You might
  • Explain the protest, despair, detachment model. Ask, did all of the children react this way? Why? Why not? Ask students to read pages 38-39 of textbook. Students to complete the following: Understand: What is short term and long term deprivation? Apply: Give examples of short term and long term deprivation. Analyse: Compare short term and long term deprivation. What are the similarities and differences? How do their effects compare? Which is worse and why? What evidence is there to support this? Elicit verbal feedback and class discussion. Evaluation – Think, pair, share. Display the following prompts: - Research - Validity - Individual Differences - Real Life Application - Irreversibility - Can any of the research evidence be used to evaluate Bowlby? (e.g. Bowlby says that maternal deprivation is detrimental, but he doesn’t account for how these effects could be reversed!) How can the effects of deprivation be evaluated in terms of the prompts? Students to note down strengths and weaknesses. Elicit verbal feedback and brainstorm as a class. (Elect lead learner to coordinate feedback). Plenary: Exam Q (June 2013): In child psychology deprivation is defined as a loss of attachment with a main caregiver. Identify one cause of deprivation and explain possible effects of this deprivation on a child’s development. (3 marks) Students to peer assess/self-assess against mark scheme. want to do some additional research for this part. 13 Big Q: How does privation affect development? To UNDERSTAND privation and research into privation. To APPLY privation to the consequences/effec To describe privation and research into privation. To explain the consequences/effec ts of privation? To compare research into Privation Starter: Give out deprivation problem page. Students to choose one problem and write a series of solutions to help reduce the negative effects. They must be justified with psychological theory and research evidence. Elicit verbal feedback; get students to share their solutions. Discuss strategies to reduce effects of deprivation. Explain that we are moving onto privation and outline big Q: How does privation affect development? Students to set their own SC/LO. Main Activities: Pose question: What is the difference between deprivation and privation? Elicit verbal Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Presentation skills. Debate. Watch Secret of a Wild Child documentary on Youtube. https://www.y outube.com/w atch?v=hmdyc JQi4QA In preparation for next lesson. Make notes
  • ts of privation. To ANALYSE privation and deprivation. To EVALUATE the argument that privation and its effects are reversible. privation and deprivation using similarities and differences. To explain arguments for and against the argument that privation and its effects are reversible. feedback. Explain that privation is when an attachment is never formed to a caregiver. Can students think of any famous examples? E.g. feral children? Split students into groups and assign one of the four studies to each group: - Koluchova (1972) Czech twins - Rutter (1998) Romanian Orphanages - Freud & Dann (1951) Concentration Camps Can either give students an outline of the study or depending on time, ask them to research for themselves. In groups they should complete the following tasks in order to feedback to the rest of the class: - Understand: What happened in the study? What was it about? What research method did they use? - Apply: What does this suggest about privation? - Analyse: How does this compare with research into deprivation? How do the findings compare to Bowlby’s deprivation hypothesis? - Evaluation: How can the study be evaluated? Students to feedback in groups. Could use the whiteboard to present. Teacher to question and extend. Bowlby versus the world debate: How far is privation reversible? Students to prepare a debate for and against the idea that Privation can be reversed. They can use the textbook pages 40 and 41; however they should draw upon prior learning and knowledge of deprivation. Students can be split into two halves for the debate. Plenary: Class post it vote. How far can the effects of privation be reversed? Students to consider this further whilst watching video for homework. question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. on: The study conducted. What happened and the findings. 14-15 ICT facilities required. Big Q: What does the study of Genie suggest about development? To UNDERSTAND the Curtiss’ case study of Genie. To APPLY the case of GENIE to To describe fine details of Curtiss’ case study of Genie. To explain how the case of Genie relates to Bowlby’s Maternal Deprivation. Genie: Key Study Starter: Display picture of Genie. Ask: Who, What, When, Why? Elicit verbal feedback from students and lead into class discussion. Outline big Question: What does the study of Genie suggest about development? Students to set their own LO/SC. Main Activities: Explain that Curtiss’ study of Genie is the second key study they need to know inside out. Ask students: What kind of study is it? How much detail would we usually go into Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Exam Q (Jan 2011) Describe Curtiss’ (1977) study of Genie: a case study of extreme privation, and evaluate it in terms of
  • Bowlby’s Maternal Deprivation theory. To EVALUATE Curtiss’ case study of genie. To explain strengths, weaknesses and ethical issues with Curtiss’ case study of Genie. about a key study? What would we outline? Illustrate that because it is a case study, we do not need to outline the A, P, F, C but instead we need to outline the Case Detail & Case Analysis. What could this mean? Elicit verbal feedback. Discuss that a case detail is what happened and an analysis is interpretation/evaluation of the case. Genie Project. Split the class into groups of 4. Give each group the task sheet. They can either, work through each task as a group or divide them up. The group that produces the best outcomes will win a prize/reward. They can conduct additional research and use the transcript sheet form the film to help them. Once tasks have been completed, regroup the class and feedback. Ask questions which probe into the fine details of the case study, how this relates to previous learning (in particular Bowlby’s Maternal Deprivation), and how the study/findings can be evaluated. Why was this study controversial in terms of ethics? What could have been done to address ethical concerns? How far does this link to last lesson? Can the effects of deprivation/privation be reversed? If time permits, peer-assess each other’s work. Peers to suggest areas that were completed well, and ideas for improvement. Students could also plan the essay question out in preparation to write it for homework in terms of A01/A02/A03. Plenary: Exam Q (Jan 2010): Using the findings of the case study of Genie (Curtiss, 1977), assess whether the effects of privation are reversible. (4 marks). Students to peer assess/self-assess using mark scheme. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. ethics, including the role of the psychologists after she was found. (12 marks). 16 Big Q: What is Autism and how does it impact on development? To UNDERSTAND symptoms, explanations and effects of Autism. To APPLY symptoms, explanations and effects of Autism to a real life case. To describe the symptoms, explanations and effects of Autism. To explain symptoms and explanations with reference to a specific real life case. To compare and contrast Autism Starter: Display picture of Michael Edge (the first man to be diagnosed as Autistic). See article. Ask students why you might be showing a picture of this man? Elicit verbal feedback and lead onto key question. Big Q: What is Autism and how does it impact on development? Students to set their own SC/LO. Main Activities: Give out article on Michael Edge. Students to read either to themselves – or read as a class out loud, with students taking it in turns to read a bit. Ask students from the article: - What is Autism? - What are the symptoms of Autism? Students to think, pair, share and then feedback to class discussion. Students could Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. 12 mark exam question (June 2012).
  • To ANALYSE explanations for Autism To EVALUATE the extent to which Autism affects development. explanations of Autism by explaining similarities and differences. To discuss the effects of Autism on development. categorise the symptoms into different types (moral, intellectual, social, cognitive). There is also a card sort for this. Students to apply their two theories to explain Michael Edge’s Autism. Students could be split into two groups: Theory of Mind explanation & Extreme Male Brain. Students to demonstrate the following in their explanations: - Understand: Description of explanation with key terms. - Apply: How it specifically relates/explains Michael’s Autism. - Analyse: Evidence to support the explanation, explaining what it shows. NB. Each group should provide a resource/set of notes for the other group on their explanation. Elicit verbal feedback – students could present each explanation – class discussion. Ask students to compare the two? Which is the best explanation and why? Students to justify their answers. They should create a list of similarities and differences. Ask: How far does Autism impact on development? (Moral, Social, Emotional, Cognitive). Students to evaluate using examples from Michael’s case. Class discussion and noting down of ideas. Finish off my presenting exam Q (June 2012): Exam Q: (June 2012) The parents of a child with a developmental disorder have been to see two doctors have been given two different explanations for the disorder. The parents are confused and have been discussing both explanations to try and decide which is the better explanation. You will have studied one of the following developmental disorders: _ severe learning difficulties _ autism _ ADHD. Outline the characteristics of one disorder from the list. Describe how each doctor may have explained the disorder to the parents of the child and show how this might help the parents understand their child’s disorder. (12 marks) Students to plan an answer to this using the mark scheme as a guide. Finish for homework. Plenary: Alternative short answer exam questions can be found in the June (2010) paper found online. others work. Reference to mark scheme. 15 - 16 Big Q: How does Day Care affect development? To describe research into the positive and negative effects of The Effects of Day Care: Key Issue Starter: What is Day Care and how do you think it affects children and their families? Elicit verbal feedback and ideas. Try to draw upon both negative and positive effects. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks Describe and evaluate card for one study on the positive
  • To UNDERSTAND research into the positive and negative effects of day care. To APPLY research to an example day care centre. To EVALUATE research into positive and negative effects of day care. day care. To explain how day care centre(s) can maximise the positive effects and minimise the negative effects. To explain strengths and weaknesses of research into the effects of day care. Outline big Q: How does day care affect development? Students to select their own LO/SC. Explain to students that this is the key issue that they will be conducting their practical on. Main Activities: Re-cap the different types of development – moral, social, emotional and cognitive. Apprentice/Dragon’s Den task. In groups of 3-4 students to come up with the ideal day care centre. In order to do this they must consider research into the positive/negative effects of day care and the characteristics of high quality care. They must design their day care centre and justify their decisions with psychological theory/research. They should then pitch it to the other groups. They can be creative as they like, choosing a name, building and location for the centre. They can either pitch is using a powerpoint or poster (utilise magazines for pictures etc.) They should be given the following to allow them to critically evaluate their own decisions: They can use the textbook (p44-45) to help them. Understand: You justify your decisions by describing at least one piece of research into the positive effects of day care and at least one piece of research into the negative effects. Apply: Apply the research to your day care centre. What can you extract from the research to help you make the best possible day care centre? Try to maximise the positive effects and minimise the negative effects. Analyse: Explain the main priorities for your day centre and why. What are the things you will focus on? Evaluate: Evaluate the studies as you go. Which piece of research is the most valid? Why? Which can you rely upon the most? When making decisions about your day care centre you should consider: Staff members & turnover, activities, stimulation, location. Each group to pitch their ideas. Students to vote on the best pitch. Or using mini whiteboard they can vote if the group should be hired or fired. Target some students to explain their assessment. Ask: Could day care be considered as a type of deprivation? How does this relate to previous learning? Bowlby’s maternal deprivation? Ask: Does day care affect all children equally? Why? Why not? What other factors come into play? Discuss the influence of duration, onset, individual differences and Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. effects of day care. Describe and evaluate card for one study on the negative effects of day care.
  • demographic background. Plenary: Exam Q: (June 2010): Many children attend daycare. Explain the possible positive effects of day care for children. (3 marks). Students to self-assess/peer assess. 17 Big Q: How should a content analysis be conducted? To UNDERSTAND what a content analysis is. To APPLY knowledge to example content analyses. To EVALUATE content analysis as a research method. To describe key features of the content analysis method. To explain how a content analysis should be conducted – using an example. To explain strengths and weaknesses of the CA method. Introduction to Practical on key issue: The Effects of Day Care. How to complete a content analysis. Starter: Re-cap key issue, What is it? Why is it important? Elicit verbal feedback. Outline big Q: ‘How should a Content Analysis should be conducted?’ Main Activities: Discuss: What is a content analysis? What data does it provide? How would we conduct a content analysis? In what situations would a content analysis be used? Elicit verbal feedback. Use a TV/Cartoon clip and analysis that as a class. Ask students what themes they have noted down? How can they be grouped together? Ask students: Can the same be done with articles? Discuss how and lead onto application to own practical. Use practical booklet to go through the process as a class – completing the content analysis as you go. Discuss: How can this research method be evaluated? What is good/bad about it? What problems did we find? How might they be solved? Students can they go and find some articles to conduct their content analysis on – using ICT facilities and old newspapers. Their content analysis must be done on The Effects of Day Care. They can have any suitable hypothesis/aim/research question as long as it applies to this area. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Numerical results from practice content analysis – interpretation of results. Tallying results. 18 To APPLY knowledge to completing their own practical. To conduct a content analysis on the key issue. To explain their Practical Research & Planning Students to start planning and carrying out their content analysis. Teacher to question students throughout and ensure they are carrying out the practical according to the requirements of the specification. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks and planning. Write up report according to template. The findings
  • Aim, Hypothesis, Method & Results. NB: When they write up their report they should use the following format. Introduction: Write up the key ideas regarding day care as a key issue. What have we looked at so far? What are the main findings and what do they suggest? Aims/hypotheses. Method/Procedure: Including subsections for: Materials & Ethics Result/Findings: This should take the format of an extended essay. Referring to previous research findings on the effects of day care. They could also link back to learning from throughout the child psychology course including: Deprivation, Bowlby’s MDH, Ainsworth’s SS, Separation Anxiety, Genie, 44 Juvenille Thieves, Research into Positive/Negative effects of day care. discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. section should take the format of an extended essay linking back to ideas we have studied throughout the child course. 19 To APPLY knowledge to completing their own practical. To EVALUATE the usefulness of their practical. To APPLY their practical to exam style questions. To explain the aim, hypothesis, method and results of their practical. To explain strengths and weaknesses of their practical using GRAVE. To construct written answers to exam questions on their practical. Evaluation of Practical, Application to Exam Q’s Students to evaluate the usefulness of their content analysis using GRAVE. They should evaluate the method they used and how valid/reliable/generalizable their findings are. They should also suggest areas for improvement if they were to complete the study again. What could have been done to improve validity/reliability etc? This could be done through peer assessment. Once evaluation is complete, they should attempt some exam questions from unit 3 on their practical. They should peer assess/self-assess against mark scheme. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Complete the discussion part of their practical report – including evaluation. 20 To revise knowledge and understanding of child psychology. UNDERSTAND APPLY N/A Revision Lesson Success criteria selected by students. Suggested strategies for revision lesson(s): Revision booklet – Students to fill out independently. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and Practical Final Hand in.
  • ANALYSE EVALUATE CREATE Quiz – QR codes? Practice Exam Questions & examiner’s reports Thinking ladder tasks based on skills: Understand Apply, Analyse, Evaluate, and Create – for any given topic which students wish to revise. Making revision materials. individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. verbal feedback throughout. 21 To apply learning to a mock assessment. N/A Assessment Students to complete timed assessment – under exam conditions. Ask CLR for copy of assessment. N/A W: Written assessment. 22 To reflect on and improve on child psychology assessment. N/A DIRT, Reflection & Improvements LO: Students can set their own success criteria based on the grades/marks they want to improve their assessment to/by. ‘By the end of the lesson I want to improve my assessment by _____ grades/marks.’ Students to use mark scheme to improve their assessment in a different colour. They should reflect on their progress and set targets by filling out their progress trackers. Improved assessments to be stored using treasury tags in individual progress trackers. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension – mark scheme and feedback. W: Written improvements. C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout.