A2 Criminological Scheme of Learning 
NB: This SoL is a working document. It should be altered as appropriate by the class...
To explain the 
strengths and 
weaknesses of 
criminology. 
Play Madeline McCann Crimewatch Clip (this can be cut short af...
experiments to 
studying the 
effectiveness of 
EWT. 
To ANALYSE 
different types of 
experiments. 
To EVALUATE 
experimen...
Ask students: Are there any other research methods we could use to better study the 
effectiveness of EWT? (Analyse) Which...
To EVALUATE SLT as 
an explanation of 
crime. 
against SLT as an 
explanation of 
crime. 
Outline big question: ‘How does ...
5 Big Q: How far does 
the role of the 
media support SLT 
in explaining 
crime? 
To UNDERSTAND 
Social Learning 
Theory a...
- There might be a biological basis to anti social behaviour, which isn’t 
accounted for in SLT. 
- Studies conducted on t...
Plenary: If you were to create or assign an existing song title to Charlton’s study, what 
would it be and why? 
7 Essay P...
labelling/SFP 
explain criminal 
behaviour? 
To UNDERSTAND 
key features of the 
SFP explanation of 
behaviour. 
To APPLY ...
To UNDERSTAND 
key features of the 
SFP explanation of 
behaviour. 
To APPLY SFP to 
examples of 
criminal behaviour. 
To ...
Students to complete similar exam question for homework. 
10 
ICT 
Facilities 
needed 
Big Q: What did 
Loftus and Palmer ...
Facilities 
Required 
EWT? 
To UNDERSTAND 
the APFC’s of 3 
studies on EWT. 
To APPLY the 3 
studies to 
understanding the...
To APPLY evidence 
to key issue of the 
reliability of EWT 
To EVALUATE 
evidence on the key 
issue of the 
reliability of...
Ask: What could be done by society to help improve the reliability of EWT? Touch 
upon the cognitive interview/police inte...
article analysis for homework. 
18 Big Q: How is token 
economy used to 
treat offenders? 
To UNDERSTAND 
how TEP are used...
To UNDERSTAND 
what anger 
management 
programmes are. 
To APPLY anger 
management 
programmes to 
treatment of 
offenders...
will be assessed. 
To APPLY article 
analysis to exam 
questions. 
To EVALUATE 
performance on 
exam questions and 
on pra...
issue of the use of 
offender profiling. 
conviction. As such some argue that profiling is just a matter of guesswork. sel...
Peer assessment & 
self-assessment when 
reading self and 
others work. 
Reference to mark 
scheme. 
·
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Resourcd File

190

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
190
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Resourcd File

  1. 1. A2 Criminological Scheme of Learning NB: This SoL is a working document. It should be altered as appropriate by the class teacher. The teacher should also incorporate DIRT Time and completion of progress trackers after assessments/essays have been completed. Teachers may also want to add a ‘Getting to Know You’ lesson with new classes. Please also make use of Examiner’s Reports and Tutor/Teacher support materials, which can be accessed by the Edexcel website. Exam Q: Can be completed in the lesson or set for homework and then PA/SA in lessons. For A Level it is important for students to get used what ‘good’ exam answers look like, particularly the 12 markers. Please make use of exemplar answers and feedback from examiner’s reports in lessons. These can be found alongside past-papers on the Edexcel website. It’s good practice to allow students to mark these answers themselves using the mark scheme, before comparing to the examiner’s mark and comments. This can be done during essay feedback/DIRT lessons. Students should also improve all of their written essays and assessments in line with the mark scheme. This can also be set for homework. Studies and research evidence for Cognitive Psychology: The studies we have chosen to use as AO2 evaluation of theories are highlighted in green throughout the specification. Subject: Psychology – Criminal Psychology (Unit 3) Year: 13 Allocated time/No. of lessons: Approximately 21-22 (including practical) Lesson No. Differentiated Learning Objectives Success Criteria Differentiated activities which promote active independent learning AFL strategies / feedback & dialogue Links to RWCM Homework 1 Big Q: What is crime and criminology? To UNDERSTAND what is a crime and the role of a criminologist. To APPLY psychological approaches to real life crime examples. To EVALUATE the usefulness of criminology. To define crime, antisocial behaviour and recidivism. To explain the role of criminology/crimino logists. To describe examples of real life crimes and explain how psychology could be helpful in interpreting them. What is Criminological Psychology? Starter: Students are given a sheet of crime scenarios. Students should discuss in pairs/groups and decide which scenarios are crimes. They should be encouraged to justify their responses. Teacher to question students – asking Why? What’s the difference? Outline of big question: ‘What is Crime & Criminology?’ Students to set their own success criteria based on the skills. E.g. ‘Understand: By the end of the lesson I will be able to define crime and explain criminology.’ Main Activities: Ask students: So what actually is crime? Is it just about violation of a law? Ask them to come up with a definition. Crime is a behaviour that violates social norms, moral values, religious beliefs or legal boundaries. What’s the difference between crime and anti-social behaviour? Is anti-social behaviour a crime? Display definitions of crime, antisocial and recidivism. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. W: Written tasks C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Create a glossary of all new key terms and definitions. Criminological
  2. 2. To explain the strengths and weaknesses of criminology. Play Madeline McCann Crimewatch Clip (this can be cut short after 4/5 minutes if necessary). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1-kBnejcM0 Ask students: How is psychology relevant to this case? What would a psychologist/criminologist be interested in? Why? Students to brainstorm ideas in pairs/threes. Students should think about suspects, witnesses and victims. Once students have ideas they should be encouraged to link these back to approaches from last year. E.g. CBT & EWT links to the cognitive approach. Progress check: What can they do? How much progress have they made towards their LO/SC? Students to now choose one task to help them meet or extend their LO/SC - Understand: Write a definition of crime, recidivism & antisocial behaviour. Explain the role of a criminologist. - Apply: Give an example of one thing criminologists are interested in/look at. - Evaluate: How useful is criminology? Feedback. Get students to feedback on the task they chose and their answers/ideas Teacher to ask for justification. Class to think about strengths and weaknesses of criminology. Plenary: Key word ping pong. One student chooses a key word and nominates a student to define it. That student explains, chooses another key word and nominates another student to define it.. and so on… OR: Exam Q (June 2012): Psychologists are interested in studying anti-social behaviour and other issues in criminological psychology. Define the term ‘anti-social behaviour’. You may wish to use an example to explain your answer. (2 marks) Students to peer assess/self- assess against mark scheme. scheme. 2 – 3 Big Q: How useful are experiments in studying eye witnesses? To UNDERSTAND lab and field experiments. To APPLY To identify and describe features of lab and field experiments. To explain how lab and field experiments are Research Methods used to study Eye Witness Effectiveness: Experiments Starter: Ask: What are Eye Witnesses? How important are they to criminologists and the police? Feedback – ask students to justify their answers. Students should be able to explain that eye witnesses are important for convictions and for a test of memory/recall. However they should be able to point out that it is a difficult issue as the reliability of eye witnesses has been contested. Ask: What kind of research method is used to study Eye Witnesses? How do you Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. W: Written tasks and written exam answer.
  3. 3. experiments to studying the effectiveness of EWT. To ANALYSE different types of experiments. To EVALUATE experiments as a method used to study EWT. used to study EWT. To explain which methods/experime nts are best for studying EWT. To explain strengths and weaknesses of using experiments to study EWT. know? Lead on to the topic of experiments… Outline big question: How useful are experiments in studying eye witness effectiveness? Students to set their own LO/SC. ‘Understand: By the end of the lesson I will be able to explain types of experiments.’ ‘Apply: By the end of the lesson I will be able to explain how experiments are used to test eye witness effectiveness.’ Main Activities Play Loftus clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP8kJ5A5xU8 Ask: What type of experiment was used in Loftus’ study? (Lab experiment). What other types of experiments are there? Students split into 4 groups. Two groups focus on lab experiments and two groups focus field experiments. In groups they must mind map/brainstorm/list: 1) Understand: All the features of their chosen experimental method. (e.g. IV, DV, Controlled conditions etc). 2) Application to context: How a psychologist would use their chosen method to study the effectiveness of EWT (step by step). Feedback. Teacher to question groups to check understanding. 3) Students should now think about evaluating their experimental method in terms reliability, validity and ethics. (Quick Re-cap on what these are, if they are getting confused, try using recipe technique, pg 40 of Psych teacher’s toolkit). 4) They should then apply each these evaluation points to the context of researching EWT. E.g. Lab studies lack ecological validity because they take place in artificial, controlled conditions which are not representative to real life. This means that we might get a more accurate picture of EWT by re-creating a more realistic situation/crime scene as opposed to testing them within a laboratory. Groups should complete as a result of their discussions in groups. Feedback. Teacher to question. During student’s explanations teacher should prompt students to use and apply key terms in their explanations. E.g. Demand characteristics, extraneous variables, informed consent, right to withdraw. Ask students to turn to page 8 of their student textbook and read the three studies at the bottom. Can they add any additional evaluation points to their table? What do each of the studies suggest about the experimental method and EWT? activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  4. 4. Ask students: Are there any other research methods we could use to better study the effectiveness of EWT? (Analyse) Which is the best type of experiment to use to study EWT? Why? Students to now apply their knowledge to a series of exam questions: June 2011: Describe one feature of the laboratory experiment as a research method used in criminological psychology. (2 marks) June 2012: Describe one research method as it is used in criminological psychology. In your answer you must refer to how the research method is used in criminological psychology. (4 marks) Outline one strength and one weakness of the research method you described above. (4 marks). If time permits give students mark scheme to SA/PA. Plenary: “In this lesson I have learnt that…” This is based on that game where one person says something like ‘My Granny went to the supermarket and she bought a lemon’, Then, the next person has to say ‘My Granny went to the supermarket and she bought a lemon and an orange’ and so on. The game is that you have to remember all the items that everybody else said, and then add your own—how many items can people get up to before they forget? This time you start off with ‘’In this lesson I have learnt that ………’ Each new student has to repeat what the students have said before them and then add one of their own. 4 Big Q: How does SLT explain criminal behaviour? To UNDERSTAND Social Learning Theory and motivation. To APPLY principles of SLT to explaining crime. To ANALYSE evidence for and against SLT as an explanation of crime. To describe social learning theory. To explain how social learning theory explains crime. To explain how studies support and challenge SLT as an explanation of crime. To explain arguments for and Social Learning Theory & Crime (including role of the media) – AO1 *Warning – some of the material in this lesson might be distressing for some as it includes details of a real life murder case. Starter: When students are sitting down describe the criminal case of the murder of Bernice Worden. Give students the context. Split the students into two groups and divide the clues up between them. They must consider the clues they have first on their own and note down their ideas as to who they think committed the crime. Students should then come together as a group and consider all the clues. Students should consider who killed her and what their motive was (why did they do it?). Feedback – groups to outline their verdict and why. It is important to elicit the why at this stage. Explain it was Ed Gein and that his criminal behaviour had been influenced by media and role models while he was growing up. Had students worked it out correctly? What does this suggest about crime (nature/nurture)? What theory does this relate to? Elicit SLT from students. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. W: Written tasks and written exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Exam Q: June 2014: Social Learning Theory uses concepts such as modelling to explain anti-social behaviour. (a) Describe the meaning of the term ‘modelling’ as it is used to explain anti-social Behaviour. (3 marks)
  5. 5. To EVALUATE SLT as an explanation of crime. against SLT as an explanation of crime. Outline big question: ‘How does SLT explain criminal behaviour?’ Students to set their own success criteria – across 2 lessons. ‘Evaluate: By the end of next lesson I will be able to explain strengths and weaknesses of SLT.’ Main Activities: Explain that as part of the course students must know one explanation for criminal behaviour from the learning approach, and one explanation from another approach. SLT = compulsory explanation from learning approach. Ask students to re-cap on the process of Social Learning Theory. How do we learn according to this theory? What are the key terms? How would this apply to crime? Is it possible to learn to commit crime? Where a student answers yes, ask them how or to explain an example. Who are the role models likely to be? Introduce Bandura’s 3 principles of Motivation. These are three factors which determine if we will copy behaviour. Vicarious Learning External Motivation Self Reinforcement Ask students to summarise what these mean. Feedback using questioning. Students should now apply their knowledge to Joe’s story (using sheet). They should read the story and apply each of Bandura’s 3 principles. They should explain how each one can provide an explanation for why Joe committed crime. They should refer to his story in their explanations. Feedback: Targeted questioning. Plenary: Exam Q: June 2012: One explanation for anti-social behaviour comes from social learning theory. This theory explains anti-social behaviour as a result of observation and imitation of a role model. It has been found that antisocial/ criminal role models who are imitated possess certain characteristics. Explain how the characteristics of a role model could influence criminal/anti-social behaviour in someone.(3 marks) Mark scheme: 1 mark for stating characteristic (high status, e.g. gang member) 1 mark for stating how this characteristic leads to identification with the role model (looks up to and imitates) 1 mark for stating how this leads to crime. (gang member shoplifts, because individual idolises them, they imitate modelled behaviour e.g. shoplifting). scheme.
  6. 6. 5 Big Q: How far does the role of the media support SLT in explaining crime? To UNDERSTAND Social Learning Theory and motivation. To APPLY principles of SLT to explaining crime. To ANALYSE evidence for and against SLT as an explanation of crime. To EVALUATE SLT as an explanation of crime. To describe social learning theory. To explain how social learning theory explains crime. To explain how studies support and challenge SLT as an explanation of crime. To explain arguments for and against SLT as an explanation of crime. Social Learning Theory & Crime – AO2 Starter: ‘Anti social behaviour is only imitated when it is modelled in real-life’ Ask students if they agree or disagree? Why? Elicit feedback by questioning. Ask them to justify their responses. Is real life crime easy to access/witness? How else might we learn criminal behaviour? Outline big question: ‘How far does the role of the media support SLT as an explanation of crime?’ Students to set their own LO’s/SC. Main Activities Research & debate task. Display quote: ‘The media plays the main role in causing anti-social behaviour.’ Students must research and prepare both sides of argument for this statement. This means they must prepare a list of arguments and evidence for and against the role of the media and anti-social behaviour. They must include at least 2 psychological studies (experimental research), real life cases/examples, and arguments for and against. (They have approximately 20 minutes). The 2 psychological studies recommended are Bandura, Ross & Ross (1963) and Anderson and Dill (2000). Students return and are split into two groups. Each member of the group elects a leader. All students in the group yet a whiteboard. They must write agree on one side and disagree on the other. The leader gets a list of statements/arguments which they read out one by one. After each has been read, all students must say if they agree or disagree by holding up their boards. If they all agree then they move on to the next one. If there is a mixture of agree and disagree they must discuss it and come to a unanimous decision. In the discussion they should use the arguments/evidence they have prepared. List of statements for leader: - Studies on media violence are few and far between and therefore are not generalizable. They cannot be applied to all anti social acts. - Bandura’s Bobo doll experiment clearly shows that there is causal link between the media and antisocial behaviour. - Those who are motivated to commit crime based on the media, could have also had a troublesome upbringing. Their crimes might not have just been caused by the media. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Research from the internet. W: Written tasks C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Debating task.
  7. 7. - There might be a biological basis to anti social behaviour, which isn’t accounted for in SLT. - Studies conducted on the media and antisocial behaviour are predominantly lab based. Therefore they lack ecological validity and may suffer from demand characteristics. - Bandura’s study clearly shows that boys will copy same sex role models on the television. This shows the influence of role models on criminal behaviour. - Watching criminal behaviour is more likely to make us scared than want to commit the act. Feedback: How can we evaluate SLT as an explanation of crime then? Students to create strengths/weaknesses/evidence on the board. One student to lead. 6 Big Q: What did Charlton do and find? To UNDERSTAND the APFC of Charlton’s study. To APPLY & ANALYSE Charlton’s study to explanations of crime. (SLT). To EVALUATE Charlton’s study. To describe the APFC of Charlton’s study To explain Charlton’s study in relation the SLT explanation of crime. To explain strengths and weaknesses of Charlton’s study using GRAVE. Charlton – Key Study – Role of Media Starter: What did we conclude last lesson about the role of the media and antisocial behaviour? Student feedback. Explain that they need to know the following key study which relates to SLT and the role of the media. Outline big question: ‘What did Charlton do and find?’ Students to set their own LO/SC Main Activities Students draw around their hand on a sheet of paper. Each finger should be filled with the Aim, Procedure, Findings, Conclusion, Evaluation. They should label their hand with the name and date of the study. Once they have created the fact file students should answer the following questions based on their new knowledge. The answers should be written around the outside of the hand. 1) Understand: Reduce the study down to 100 key words. 2) Apply: What does this suggest about crime? 3) Analyse: What does this study provide evidence for? Explain… 4) Evaluate: How can this study be evaluated? GRAVE Use the name generator and Charlton quiz to assess student’s understanding of the study. Ask students to explain how this study relates to our previous learning? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. W: Written tasks C: class discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  8. 8. Plenary: If you were to create or assign an existing song title to Charlton’s study, what would it be and why? 7 Essay Planning – 12 marker. To UNDERSTAND how a 12 marker will be assessed. To APPLY knowledge to a 12 mark question. To ANALYSE essay plans for a 12 mark question. To EVALUATE essay plan for a 12 mark question. To describe key features of the mark scheme. To plan out an answer to a 12 mark question, using prior learning. To compare and contrast essay plans by considering similarities and differences. To assess essay plans against the mark scheme, suggesting areas for improvement. Essay Planning Starter: Ask what command words/injunctions are and how important are they in exam questions? Re-cap on the main injunctions used at AS. What do they mean and how do you demonstrate them? Elicit verbal feedback from students and lead into class discussion. Outline aims for lesson. Explain that will be exploring how to answer a 12 marker at A2 level. Students to set their own LO/SC. Main Activities: Give out the mark scheme for this question. Students to underline/highlight. What do the students notice about how this question will be assessed? What are the key words? What’s the difference between the top two mark bands? How will they hit all of the criteria? Discuss as a class. Present exam Q (Jan 2011) Split students into groups of 3-4 (could be grouped by ability). Each group must arrive at a way of planning this essay. They can do this any way they like, but try to encourage innovative methods of planning. They must complete a plan and present it to the rest of the class. In their plan they must show: - How they have hit the injunctions - How they have shown depth and breadth of knowledge - What material they have used for A01/A02 - How they planned their essay, what method they used and why? How useful did they find the method overall? Students to present their plans to the class. After presentations groups to consider each of the other group’s plans and peer assess. What was good about them? What worked well? What could they do to improve their plan? They may refer to mark scheme. Complete an assessment sheet. Discuss as a class: Which plan would produce the best essay? Why? Encourage comparisons between the plans. Ask for justification. Students to complete the essay for homework. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension from mark scheme. W: Written tasks, essay planning and exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Presentation skills. Exam Q (Jan 2011) Sam overheard some people commenting that she was likely to become a troublemaker because her older brother is often in trouble with the police. Using your knowledge of social learning theory, explain how Sam may be likely to become a criminal and evaluate your explanation (12 marks). 8 Big Q: How does To describe the SFP Self-Fulfilling Prophecy - AO1 R: Reading and
  9. 9. labelling/SFP explain criminal behaviour? To UNDERSTAND key features of the SFP explanation of behaviour. To APPLY SFP to examples of criminal behaviour. To ANALYSE evidence for and against the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. To EVALUATE the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. explanation of criminal behaviour using key terms. To explain SFP using examples of criminal behaviour. To explain evidence for and against the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. To discuss strengths and weaknesses of the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. Starter: Display the following terms ‘Chav’ ‘ASBO’ ‘Druggie’ ‘Hoodie.’ Ask students: What’s the link between these terms? Why are they significant? Elicit verbal feedback. Ask how these terms might explain criminal behaviour? Try to evoke the terms ‘labelling’ and ‘self-fulfilling prophecy.’ Discuss the link between the two – how does labelling lead to self-fulfilling prophecy? How might this then lead to crime? Can students think of any more modern day labels for criminals? Outline big question: ‘How does labelling/SFP explain criminal behaviour?’ Students to set own LO/SC. Main Activities: Display the term stereotyping. Re-cap from AS. What is this and how does it link to SFP? Elicit verbal feedback. Encourage the use of examples in explanations. Which approach does this explanation come from? (this is their 2nd explanation for criminal behaviour – from the social approach). Independent study tasks: Understand: What is the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour? How does it explain crime? You may draw a diagram or write an explanation but it must include key terms. Apply: Write an example of how a SFP leads to crime using the three step model 1) Prophecy Set, 2) Expectation, 3) Prophecy is fulfilled. Analyse: Use SFP evidence sheet and colour code the relevant sections of each study so they match up. For each study explain how it supports the SFP explanation of crime. Extension: Evaluation: Higher abilities can start to evaluate the theory. Challenge them by preventing use of book/resources. They should evaluate it using their own critical thinking skills. Elicit verbal feedback of key ideas. Question students on all the tasks/skills. Facilitate class discussion where opportunities arise. Plenary: Exam Q (June 2012): Describe one explanation of criminal/anti-social behaviour other than social learning theory. (5 marks). Students to peer assess/ self-assess against mark scheme. comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. W: Written tasks and written exam answer. C: class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. 9 Big Q: How does labelling/SFP explain criminal behaviour? To describe the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour using key terms. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy – AO2 & Comparison Re-cap on key terms and LO/SC. What are there next steps? What do they need to do now to achieve/extend their SC? Explain that this lesson will focus on evaluation and comparison. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Highlighting key words. Exam question June (2010) There has been a recent increase in
  10. 10. To UNDERSTAND key features of the SFP explanation of behaviour. To APPLY SFP to examples of criminal behaviour. To ANALYSE SFP and SLT as explanations of criminal behaviour. To EVALUATE the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. To explain SFP using examples of criminal behaviour. To compare and contrast the SFP and SLT explanations by explaining similarities and differences. To discuss strengths and weaknesses and research evidence of the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour Main Activities: Display the prompts: - Evidence - Ethics - Validity - Real life application - Comparison with SLT. Blow these prompts up on A3 paper and stick them around the room. In pairs or individually, students to visit each prompt and consider how they might use it to evaluate the SFP explanation of criminal behaviour. They should write their evaluation points on the A3 sheet and move on to the next one. Encourage higher abilities to expand on points written down. Remind students that it is important to explain WHY their point is a strength or a weakness of the theory. (Use PEEL as an additional elaboration tool). Once finished, get pairs to bring a sheet with them and allow them to feed back the evaluation points on the sheet. During discussion try to get students to elaborate as much as possible asking ‘Why is that an issue?’ ‘How would we express that in an essay?’ ‘Is that an effective evaluation point? Why? Why not?’ ‘How does that link back to the prompt/key term?’ E.g. ‘Madon’s study is a correlational study. This is a weakness because a causal effect between expectation and crime could not be established. There could be other variables impacting on Madon’s findings which were not accounted for, therefore affecting the validity of Madon’s results.’ Ask: How does this explanation compare with SLT? Which is a better theory and why? Allow for justification. Students to individually attempt the Exam Q (June 2011): Social Learning Theory is not the only suggested cause of criminal behaviour; other psychologists may explain criminal behaviour through biological or social explanations. Evaluate one explanation of criminal/anti-social behaviour, other than Social Learning Theory. (4 marks). Students to peer assess/ self-assess using mark scheme. Plenary: Give students the example essay and ask them to read and assess it against the mark scheme. Discuss what mark it would achieve? Which mark band would it fit into and why? discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. W: Written tasks and written exam answer. PEEL. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. anti-social behaviour amongst girls which has led to more ASBOs (Anti- Social Behaviour Orders) being served. Describe how one psychological theory other than Social Learning Theory explains anti-social behaviour, and evaluate this explanation. (12 marks)
  11. 11. Students to complete similar exam question for homework. 10 ICT Facilities needed Big Q: What did Loftus and Palmer do and find? To UNDERSTAND the APFC of Loftus & Palmer’s study. To APPLY Loftus and Palmer’s study to the issue of EWT. To ANALYSE results of Loftus and Palmer’s study. To EVALUATE Loftus and Palmer’s study. To describe the APFC of Loftus and Palmer’s study. To explain what Loftus and Palmer’s study suggests about EWT. To identify and explain trends in results for Loftus & Palmer’s study. To discuss strengths and weaknesses of Loftus and Palmer’s study. EWT Key Study – Loftus & Palmer (1974) Leading Q’s Starter: What can you remember from AS about this study? Elicit verbal feedback and class discussion. Outline big Q: What did Loftus and Palmer do and find? Main Activities Students to use ICT facilities to produce a facebook/twitter profile for Elizabeth Loftus. There is a template and example in the resources to help students. The profile should include statuses/tweets from ‘Loftus’ covering the APFC of her famous study with Palmer (1974). Give them the following criteria to help them: Understand: Post a status from Loftus outlining the Aim, Procedure & Findings of the study (Loftus & Palmer (1974). You might want to include a link to video/article/more information. Apply & Analyse: Post a graph/table of the results. Interpret them. What do they suggest? What was concluded from the results about EWT? Evaluate: Post comments on Loftus’ statuses from other facebook/twitter users pointing out strengths and weaknesses of the study. Remember GRAVE! Allow students to be as creative as they like, but they must show from their work that they have hit their chosen success criteria. In time allows use their work for class feedback, discussing the key points of the study to assess their understanding. Once finished, print out and peer assess against the success criteria for the lesson. Plenary: Exam Question (June 2010): (a) Loftus and Palmer (1974) investigated the effect of leading questions on eyewitness testimony. Outline the findings (results and/or conclusions) of Loftus and Palmer’s experiment (3 marks). (b) Evaluate Loftus and Palmer’s (1974) experiment in terms of validity. (2 marks) Peer assess/self-assess against mark scheme and discuss key pointers as a class. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Internet research. W: Written tasks C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation (graph/table) of results from study. 13 – 14 ICT Big Q: What do alternative studies suggest about To describe the APFC of 3 studies on EWT. (Field, Lab EWT Studies. Students must know three studies on EWT in detail. One Lab Experiment: Weapon Focus – Pickel (1998) One Field Study: Yuille & Cutshall (1986) - Can be found in unit guide. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Exam Q (June 2011) Describe one field study
  12. 12. Facilities Required EWT? To UNDERSTAND the APFC’s of 3 studies on EWT. To APPLY the 3 studies to understanding the issue of EWT. To ANALYSE similarities and differences of the 3 studies. To EVALUATE the 3 studies on EWT. and one other). To explain what each of the 3 studies suggest about EWT. To explain the similarities and differences between the 3 studies. To discuss strengths and weaknesses of each of the 3 studies – by considering the methods used. One Other: Yarmey (2004) Explain to students the above. They need to know three studies on EWT in detail. Outline big Q: What do alternative studies suggest about EWT? Students to set their own SC/LO. Main Activities Students split into groups. Each group is allocated one study. They should research the study in full and produce a presentation/mini lesson on the study for the rest of the group. They must ensure that every member of the class takes away a resource/set of detailed notes on the study. Any group that doesn’t provide a set of notes will not be allowed notes from the other group. The presentation must include the APFC of the study as well as evaluation. It may be as interactive / creative as they like. Allow students to present their presentations/lessons. Probe using questioning and ask for justification/explanation. Students should now have a set of notes on each of the studies. Using these in their groups they must consider the following: (They should discuss and note down their ideas). Apply – What does each study suggest about EWT? Analyse – How do they compare/contrast? Are there any similarities/differences between them? How do they compare to Loftus’ study? Evaluate – Which study is the best and why? Think GRAVE and the type of study/experiment they are. Class discussion. Elicit feedback from groups and provoke debate. The ‘best’ study is up for debate in terms of validity and reliability. Plenary: Bulletpoint list of ideas on the June 2011 Exam Q they have been set for homework. Discuss ideas. Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. Research task. W: Written tasks and exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Presentation skills. you have learned about in criminological psychology. Evaluate the field experiment as a research method. (12 marks). 15 -16 Big Q: How reliable is EWT? To UNDERSTAND the key issue of the reliability of EWT. To describe the key issue of the reliability of EWT. To explain evidence in relation to the EWT Key Issue: The Issue of Reliability of Eye Witness Testimony Starter: From the research we have looked at so far? Can EWT be reliable? Why? Why not? Elicit verbal feedback. Why is this important for society? Try to elicit it is important as this evidence if incorrect could lead to false imprisonment. Therefore leading to an unjust society. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. W: Written tasks and exam answer.
  13. 13. To APPLY evidence to key issue of the reliability of EWT To EVALUATE evidence on the key issue of the reliability of EWT. key issue of the reliability of EWT. To explain strengths and weaknesses of evidence into the reliability of EWT. IMPORTANT: The key issue isn’t just the topic of EWT, but it’s about the reliability of EWT and how important it is for society! Outline big question: ‘How reliable is EWT?’ Main Activities: Are eyewitnesses reliable? Provide groups with a selection of news reports of crimes that also refer to eyewitnesses. Allow them to identify issues in relation to, for example, causes of crime, the role of eyewitnesses, the potential or actual fate of the perpetrator. Ask them to list all the factors that might affect the reliability of EWT? What evidence have we got so far for EWT being reliable / unreliable? Mind map ideas of factors and evidence on the board. Could elect a lead learner to elicit ideas from peers. Photocopy pages 31-33 from student unit guide. Blow up and stick multiple copies around the room. Students are not allowed to use them on their desks, but must use them as a reference on the walls. This should encourage them to comprehend the information and summarise in own words – as opposed to copying! Give students following tasks: Understand: Describe the key issue – the reliability of EWT. You must touch upon why it is an important issue. Apply: Explain evidence for and against the issue. You need to find evidence suggesting that EWT is reliable, and evidence suggesting that EWT is NOT reliable. You may use evidence we have already looked at. Evaluate: Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence. Explain what could be concluded from this about the reliability of EWT. Jury role play using the arguments they have prepared. Split class into 3 groups. Group 1: Prosecution: Arguing that EWT is unreliable Group 2: Defence: Arguing that EWT is reliable Group 3: Jury: Having listened to the prosecution and defence, these students will have to come to a conclusion as to whether EWT is reliable or unreliable. One member of the prosecution and defence take it in turns to put points across. Each member of each group must contribute a point. They can also respond to each other’s points. After points have been discussed, the jury must have some time to deliberate on what they have heard and decide as a group whether EWT is reliable or unreliable. One member of the jury must fully justify their decision based on psychological theory/evidence. feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Jury/debate task.
  14. 14. Ask: What could be done by society to help improve the reliability of EWT? Touch upon the cognitive interview/police intervention. 17 Practical: How to conduct the Article Analysis? To UNDERSTAND how to conduct an Article Analysis To APPLY knowledge of the reliability of EWT to complete an article analysis. To ANALYSE two articles in relation to the reliability of EWT. To describe how to complete an article analysis. To plan/carry out own article analysis linking back to evidence/concepts/ theories on the reliability of EWT. To compare and contrast two articles in order to form a conclusion on the reliability of EWT. EWT Article Analysis Introduction & Planning. (Including how to write an article analysis). Explain that for the practical students must conduct an article analysis on the key issue: The issue of the reliability of EWT. Ask students what they think an article analysis is? Elicit verbal feedback. What kind of data will it produce? Can produce both qualitative and quantitative. How would you go about collecting and analysing data? (Analysing/summarising can involve qualitative and/or quantitative measures such as theme analysis, interpretation, shortening, reviewing, reading, taking down main points, looking for comparisons, totalling, graphs and tables, statistics.) Explain that students need to select two articles from the media to investigate (factors affecting) the reliability of EWT. Looking at eyewitness testimony and its reliability in court, find one example of where there have been problems when convicting someone on the basis of eyewitness testimony and one example of where decisions have been made by the courts to try to make sure eyewitness testimony is reliable. Summarise the two articles separately. Then use knowledge of research in the field to comment on what the two articles have said. Use the practical guide to help you explain. Or they could select two articles, one which suggests EWT is reliable and one which suggests EWT is unreliable. Possible aim: ‘To investigate how the media portrays EWT reliability.’ Ask students what could be the aim of the article analysis? Arrive at a class aim for all students to investigate. Must be realistic. E.g. ‘To investigate the reliability of EWT in courts.’ Ask students what they are looking for? How do we go about it? Identify themes that relate to theory/evidence/concepts. Use two article excerpts from the practical guide. Students should underline bits they could analyse and relate to theory/evidence/concepts. Show them the comments made in response to these articles as a guide. Once students have analysed both articles and commented, they should come to some conclusion in relation to their aim. This should refer to theory/concepts/evidence on EWT. Students to plan out and research their own articles so they can complete their Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of articles. W: Written tasks and written analysis. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Conduct article analysis and write up.
  15. 15. article analysis for homework. 18 Big Q: How is token economy used to treat offenders? To UNDERSTAND how TEP are used to treat offenders. To APPLY TEP to real life examples of treating offenders. To ANALYSE evidence for/against the use of TEP to treat offenders. To EVALUATE the use of TEP to treat offenders. To describe how TEP are used to treat offenders. To explain how TEP is used by relating to an example. To explain evidence for and against the use of TEP for treatment of offenders. To discuss strengths and weaknesses of TEP as a treatment for offenders. Treating Offenders – Token Economy Starter: Read article on treating young offenders. Ask students to consider what the article is suggesting and whether it is a good way of treating offenders? Elicit verbal feedback. What theory is this treatment based on? (Operant conditioning). Re-cap over the main principles of operant conditioning. Elicit key terms. Outline big question ‘How is token economy used to treat offenders?’ Students to set their own SC/LO. Main Activities: Discuss as class what is token economy. Ask students to write down a short definition. Students to imagine that they were treating a young offender who was charged for burglary and drug abuse. Students to plan out rehabilitation programme using token economy. This could lead into a role play (but be careful with ethically unsuitable examples!) Students could be split into groups and each group role-play their rehabilitation programme. Compare the different techniques. Peer-assess – which rehabilitation programme might be the most successful? Why? Ask: How useful would this be as a treatment? Long term? Short term? Why? Class discussion. Using the textbook students to complete independent study task(s): -Analyse: Explain evidence for/against token economy as a treatment for offenders. -Evaluate: Explain strengths and weaknesses of token economy as a treatment for offenders. Elicit verbal feedback and discuss. Plenary: Exam Q (Jan 2012): Chris is worried that a token economy programme will not improve the behaviour of the prisoners. Outline two weaknesses with token economy programmes. You should relate the use of such programmes to prisons at least once in your answer. (4 marks). Students to self-assess/peer assess against mark scheme. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Reading article. W: Written tasks and exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Role play. Read article on Anger Management for next lesson. Underline/hig hlight and annotate key parts. (Flipped learning lesson). 19 Big Q: How are Anger Management Programmes used to treat offenders? To describe anger management strategies using key terms. Treating Offenders – Anger Management Programmes Starter: How did you find the article to read? Rate on a scale of 1-10. Write down one thing on a post it note you found interesting/ you learned from the article. Stick it on the board. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. W: Written tasks Exam Q (Jan 2010) The Governor of Markdale prison has
  16. 16. To UNDERSTAND what anger management programmes are. To APPLY anger management programmes to treatment of offenders. To ANALYSE token economy and anger management as treatments for offenders. To EVALUATE anger management as a treatment for offenders. To explain how an anger management programme would be used to treat an offender. To compare and contrast token economy with anger management by explaining strengths and weaknesses. To explain strengths, weaknesses and evidence for anger management as a treatment for offenders. Outline big Q: ‘How are anger management programmes used to treat offenders? Students to set their own SC/LO. Main Activities: Split students into groups and give them the list of skills: Understand, Apply, Analyse Each group should produce a series of questions for another group to answer on Anger Management Programmes. They will already have some knowledge from the article. The questions to help the other group to achieve the above 3 skills. Elicit verbal feedback to assess questions produced. Groups to swap questions. On whiteboard paper/ A3 paper they should answer the other group’s questions. If possible they should answer by using the article alone. If they need to they may use the textbook. Elicit verbal feedback. Ask: What is anger management? How is it used? How does it compare to token economy? Class discussion. Cut out items from cut and paste evidence sheet, and evaluation sheet. Split the items between the three groups. Around the room stick up A3 sheets with Strength & Weakness on. Each group to read their items and decide if they are a strength/weakness of anger management programmes. They should stick it on the relevant sheet. Feedback: Students to pick 3 most important strengths and most important weaknesses and explain them. They should make a note of these and explain them fully, elaborating on why it is a strength/weakness. Ask students to compare the two therapies we have looked at in terms of similarities and differences. Which is better? Why? Ask for justification. Plenary: Give out exemplar essay question. Students to read and pick out areas that went well, areas for improvement. Grade using generic mark scheme for 12 marker. Students to complete a similar 12 marker for homework. discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. and exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. recently had problems in managing the behaviour of the prisoners. The prison service has recommended using token economy programmes (TEP) as a technique to control behaviour. Describe how the Governor might implement a token economy programme in Markdale prison and evaluate the effectiveness of token economy programmes. (12 marks). 20 How will the practical be assessed? To UNDERSTAND how the practical To describe how the practical will be assessed. To answer exam questions on article Evaluation of practical and application to exam questions Starter: How did you conduct your article analysis? How did you find it? How useful do you think this is as a method? Main Activities: Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal R: Reading and comprehension of others work. W: Written improvements Practical first hand in due.
  17. 17. will be assessed. To APPLY article analysis to exam questions. To EVALUATE performance on exam questions and on practical. analysis. To assess exam answers/article analysis using mark scheme in order to channel improvements. Students should bring article analysis to lesson in the form of their report. Students to swap and peer-assess their analysis. What is good? What could be improved? Elicit feedback of what students have learned from their peer’s work. Students could read each other’s and compare to their own to suggest targets for improvement. Students to act on these assessments by making improvements to their work. Use this as opportunity to go around and have individual discussions with students about their practical’s – ensuring they have completed it in line with the specification. Students to attempt a series of exam questions on their practical from Jan 2012 paper: During your course you will have conducted a practical investigation on a topic in criminological psychology using either a content analysis or a summary of two article sources. (a) What was the aim/purpose of your practical investigation? (2 marks) (b) A summary or a content analysis require different methods of gathering information to produce data. They also involve different ways of analysing/ summarising the findings. Describe how you went about gathering and analysing/summarising the data for your practical investigation. (3 marks) (c) Explain the findings (results and/or conclusions) you have drawn from your practical investigation. You must use psychological concepts (e.g. research and/or theories) that you have studied. (4 marks). Self-assess against mark scheme. Discuss as a class. Spare time can be spent improving their exam answers in line with mark scheme. feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. and exam answers. C: class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. 21 (OPTIONAL) Big Q: How useful is offender profiling? To UNDERSTAND the issue of the use of offender profiling. To APPLY evidence to the issue of the use of offender profiling. To EVALUATE evidence on the To describe the issue of the use of offender profiling. To explain evidence for and against the use of offender profiling. To evaluate evidence on the use of offender profiling. Optional Key Issue: The Use of Offender Profiling Article Analysis Final Due in. There is an opportunity for an optional lesson on the use of offender profiling as a second key issue. If time permits, this would give students the option of entering the exam with two key issues. They must be able to describe the issue alongside evidence for and against it. E.g. They must describe what offender profiling is and how it is used in society, including the stages a profiler will go through. Why is it important? They can touch on real life cases and psychological evidence: E.g: FOR – The Railway Killer John Duffy – Profile made by David Canter lead to the correct conviction. AGAINST – The case of Rachel Nickell’s murder. Profiling lead to an incorrect Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & R: Reading and comprehension from textbook. Research. W: Written tasks and exam answer. C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  18. 18. issue of the use of offender profiling. conviction. As such some argue that profiling is just a matter of guesswork. self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. 22 To revise knowledge and understanding of criminological psychology. UNDERSTAND APPLY ANALYSE EVALUATE CREATE Revision Lesson Success criteria selected by students. Suggested strategies for revision lesson(s): Revision booklet – Students to fill out independently. Quiz – QR codes? Practice Exam Questions & examiner’s reports Thinking ladder tasks based on skills: Understand Apply, Analyse, Evaluate, and Create – for any given topic which students wish to revise. Making revision materials. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension W: Written tasks & exam answer C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Practical final hand in due. 23 To apply learning to a mock assessment. N/A Assessment Students to complete timed assessment – under exam conditions. Ask CLR for copy of assessment. N/A W: Written assessment. 24 To reflect on and improve on criminological psychology assessment. N/A DIRT, Reflection & Improvements LO: Students can set their own success criteria based on the grades/marks they want to improve their assessment to/by. ‘By the end of the lesson I want to improve my assessment by _____ grades/marks.’ Students to use mark scheme to improve their assessment in a different colour. They should reflect on their progress and set targets by filling out their progress trackers. Improved assessments to be stored using treasury tags in individual progress trackers Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. R: Reading and comprehension – mark scheme and feedback. W: Written improvements. C: Discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  19. 19. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. ·

×