Scheme of Learning (May 2014) 
The new SoL will be in a booklet form that every member of staff will have. Copies will als...
Subject: Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology - Memory Year: 12 Allocated time/No. of lessons: Approx 20-23 lessons 
Lesson 
No. 
...
understanding behaviour. 
Students to feedback verbally, allowing teacher to assess their learning. 
Plenary: Passing note...
Reveal the answers and ask: 
1) How did you recall the reindeer? 
2) Did you use any strategies? 
3) How easy were they to...
design to real life 
examples/experime 
nts. 
To EVALUATE the 
experimental 
design. 
and hypotheses. 
To explain strength...
again on the board. Compare the results… Ask ‘How similar are the results?’ ‘What 
does this suggest about our experiment?...
5 Big Q: What 
experiments do we 
use in psychology 
and how useful are 
they? 
To UNDERSTAND 
the experimental 
design. 
...
Finish by applying their knowledge to exam questions. Students to choose from three 
exam questions depending on their LO/...
3) What do we already know about long term memory? 
Explain features of each memory store. 
Complete Sperling’s experiment...
real life examples of 
memory. 
To ANALYSE the 
multistore model 
using evidence. 
To EVALUATE the 
multistore model. 
To ...
essay for homework. 
8 Big Q: How does 
Levels of 
Processing explain 
memory? 
To UNDERSTAND 
the LOP model of 
memory. 
...
Similarities/Differences. 
4) Evaluate: Higher abilities to start considering strengths/weaknesses of 
model. 
Feedback an...
the LOP model. Evidence they should cover: Craik & Tulving (1975), Hyde & Jenkins (1973), Morris 
(1977). 
Ask students: W...
10 Big Q: What did 
Craik & Tulving do 
and find? 
To UNDERSTAND 
Craik & Tulving’s 
Study. 
To APPLY Craik & 
Tulving’s s...
practical. 
To APPLY features 
of experiments to 
their own practical. 
To EVALUATE plans 
for the practical. 
referring t...
To ANALYSE 
evidence for and 
against Cue 
Dependent 
Forgetting. 
To EVALUATE Cue 
Dependent 
Forgetting. 
Dependent 
For...
They should fill out the grid worksheet. 
Elicit verbal feedback and question students to assess understanding. Ask open 
...
Show clip: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7870132.stm Ask students what 
relevance this has to Cue Dependent Theory. E...
Aim, Procedure, Findings, Conclusion. 
Once completed the jigsaw they should stick it onto a large sheet of paper and 
ann...
To ANALYSE Trace 
Decay with Cue 
Dependent 
Forgetting. 
To EVALUATE Trace 
Decay as a theory of 
forgetting. 
difference...
17 
First draft 
of 
practical 
so far due 
in. 
Big Q: How will I be 
assessed on my 
practical? 
To UNDERSTAND 
how the ...
Plenary: Once finished peer assess/self assess and discuss criteria for success as a 
class. 
18 – 19 
ICT and 
research 
...
Students must also consider the success criteria to help them reach their LO: 
- Understand – Describe research into EWT. ...
assessment. Students to complete timed assessment – under exam conditions. Ask CLR for copy of 
assessment. 
write exam 
a...
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  1. 1. Scheme of Learning (May 2014) The new SoL will be in a booklet form that every member of staff will have. Copies will also be available on the U drive. Booklets will consist of: 1. Contents Page 2. Relevant assessment levels 3. Success Criteria (golden ticket) 4. DIRT / T&L strategies (provided by DGW/RND) 5. Curriculum Map linked to skills not content 6. BLP – 4 R’s Reflective, resourcefulness, resilience, reciprocity (provided by Lynne Harris) 7. Each topic / SoL front sheet for assessment focus including AFL ladders Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology NB: This SoL is a working document. It should be altered as appropriate by the class teacher. The teacher should also incorporate DIRT Time and completion of progress trackers after assessments/essays have been completed. Teachers may also want to add a ‘Getting to Know You’ lesson with new classes. Please also make use of Examiner’s Reports and Tutor/Teacher support materials, which can be accessed by the Edexcel website. Exam Q: Can be completed in the lesson or set for homework and then PA/SA in lessons. For A Level it is important for students to get used what ‘good’ exam answers look like, particularly the 12 markers. Please make use of exemplar answers and feedback from examiner’s reports in lessons. These can be found alongside past-papers on the Edexcel website. It’s good practice to allow students to mark these answers themselves using the mark scheme, before comparing to the examiner’s mark and comments. This can be done during essay feedback/DIRT lessons. Students should also improve all of their written essays and assessments in line with the mark scheme. This can also be set for homework. Studies and research evidence for Cognitive Psychology: The studies we have chosen to use as AO2 evaluation of theories are highlighted in green throughout the specification.
  2. 2. Subject: Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology - Memory Year: 12 Allocated time/No. of lessons: Approx 20-23 lessons Lesson No. Differentiated Learning Objectives Success Criteria Differentiated activities which promote active independent learning AFL strategies / feedback & dialogue Links to RWCM Homework 1 Big Q: What is Cognitive Psychology? To UNDERSTAND the assumptions of the cognitive approach. To UNDERSTAND how the cognitive approach explains human behaviour. To APPLY cognitive psychology to the role of a cognitive psychologist. To EVALUATE Cognitive Psychology To define key terms of the Cognitive Approach. To describe the Cognitive Approach and the role of a Cognitive Psychologist. To explain how Cognitive Approach explains human behaviour. To explain the strengths and weaknesses of the Cognitive Approach. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology Starter: What could be the link between the cognitive approach and a computer? Ask students to think, pair share. Teacher to elicit verbal feedback through questioning. Ask students to justify their responses. Outline big question. ‘What is cognitive psychology?’ Students to set their own learning objectives/success criteria. E.g. ‘Understand: By the end of the lesson I will be able to define the key terms from the cognitive approach…’ Main Activities: Explain information processing/computer metaphor. Problem solving task in groups. Students given a cog’s puzzle. They must decide which way the lever should be pulled in order to make the cogs turn in the right direction. Teacher to elicit targeted feedback. Students should explain their decisions. Teacher should ask students how they went about solving that problem. In their groups, what mental processes did they require in order to complete it? Teacher should ask how each mental process is used. Teacher to reveal the mental processes we use every day and how they can be applied to the puzzle. (See powerpoint slide 9). Students to apply the cog puzzle to the information processing model. What would be the input, processing, output and storage? Ask students to explain verbally their ideas. Teacher to ask: What about the process of crossing the road? How would that fit into this model? Teacher to ask: Considering everything you have learned so far this lesson, what might a cognitive psychologist do? Teacher to question and ask students to justify their responses. Talk through the roles of a cognitive psychologist. Students to complete worksheet on cognitive psychology. Summarising all the key points they have learned so far. Higher ability students to evaluate the usefulness of the cognitive approach. Students should think in terms of society and in terms of Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R – Reading and comprehending information. W – Written tasks and plenary, and exam question for homework. C – Group work – problem solving activity, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Exam Q Homework: Jan 2013: Your younger brother will be starting psychology at college soon and wants to know about the underlying concepts of the Cognitive Approach. Describe how the Cognitive Approach explains human behaviour. (4 marks)
  3. 3. understanding behaviour. Students to feedback verbally, allowing teacher to assess their learning. Plenary: Passing notes. Students split into groups of 7 (or 3 or 4). The aim is to get a complete set of correct notes without cheating (discussing or using your notes!). Students should decide on an order in which each member of their group will play. A question appears on the screen; the first player should write down the answer at the top of a sheet of paper and fold it over. They should then pass it onto the next player who answers the next question and folds it over again. This is continued until all questions have been answered. Teacher to unveil answers and teams Self Assess their notes. 2 Big Q: What is memory and how does it work? To UNDERSTAND the different types of memory. To APPLY the different types of memory to real life. To EVALUATE the usefulness of understanding memory. To recall and explain the different types of memory. To explain how memory works in real life. To explain how useful understanding memory is for real life. What is Memory? Starter: Students to imagine they have lost their memory. They wake up and they cannot remember anything. They must think about and discuss the following questions: 1. What do you normally do in a day that you would no longer be able to do? 2. What if you did not recognise your friends or family? 3. What experiences would you miss if you couldn’t remember TV programmes or news articles? 4. How could you plan your day if you forgot what you were thinking about a few minutes earlier? Teacher to ask for verbal feedback using questioning. Ask for justification to all responses. E.g. Why? What would happen? Where would we be without…? Outline of big question: What is Memory and how does it work? Students to set their own learning objectives/success criteria. E.g. Understand: ‘By the end of the lesson I will be able to explain the different types of memory.’ Main Activities Read and explain the amazing brain. Ask students what actually is memory? Students to give verbal feedback. Ask ‘Why is memory important? Give definition. Play Santa’s reindeer clip. After playing the clip ask students to recall all of the reindeer they can remember. They should write them down individually. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading information from presentation. W: Written tasks and experiment. C: Class experiment, discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Class experiment results.
  4. 4. Reveal the answers and ask: 1) How did you recall the reindeer? 2) Did you use any strategies? 3) How easy were they to recall? Why? Students to discuss and feedback their answers. Try to elicit the different memory strategies used e.g. rehearsal and ask why they work? E.g. Why is repeating the information out loud verbally, good for remembering information? What happens if we don’t repeat/rehearse? Link on to Sensory Memory & Short Term Memory and explain these concepts. Ask students to think about and write down: 1) What is your earliest memory? How old were you? How does it make you feel? 2) How vividly can you remember it? It is a complete picture? Tell them not to think about it too much, just write down the first thing that comes into their head. Ask for students who would like to share. Question them: How easy is it to remember these things? Is it clear? Why? Why can we remember some things about our early life, but not others? Lead on to long term memory and explain. Students to create summaries of the different types of memory. Higher abilities & those with Evaluation LO’s to consider how useful it is to for psychologists to understand memory processes. How useful is it to real life? Plenary: Create an exam question and corresponding based on something in the lesson. Swap with a peer, answer each other’s and peer assess. 3-4 Big Q: What experiments do we use in psychology and how useful are they? To UNDERSTAND the experimental design. To APPLY the experimental To describe the main types of experiments, and key terms from the experimental method. To explain examples of each type of experiment, participant designs Types of Experiments (AO1, AO2) Starter: If we were going to conduct a psychology experiment on memory, what would we need? Make a list. Verbal feedback & questioning. Outline of big question. What experiments do we use in psychology and how useful are they? Students to set their own LO’s/SC Main Activities Give students key word card sort. They must know what these terms mean off by heart. In pairs get them to organise them into key word and definition. Targeted verbal feedback to follow. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. R: Reading information & key word card sort. Comprehension of key words. W: Written tasks. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  5. 5. design to real life examples/experime nts. To EVALUATE the experimental design. and hypotheses. To explain strengths and weaknesses of using each type of experiment in psychology. Once organised correctly, students must complete the glossary worksheet with the key terms, definitions and revision aid/image. After they have completed the work sheet give them a test on these key terms. Read a series of definitions out, they must write down the correct key work. Peer/Self Assess. Lead on to experiments. Ask students to think and discuss.. Why might we conduct psychological experiments in a laboratory? Elicit class discussion. Ask students.. ‘What are the advantages of using a lab to study human behaviour?’ Watch the short clip to consolidate http://www.thepsychologyfaculty.org/a-levels/item/92-why-use-laboratory- experiments-in-psychology Now ask students to think about all three types of experiments we use in psychology: Lab, Field, and Natural. Get them to discuss and write a definition of each, and apply their knowledge to an example of what each would be used to study in psychology. E.g. sleep disorders would be investigated in a lab because.. Targeted feedback – question students and elicit discussion, allowing them to justify and explain their responses. Explain that you are going to conduct a class experiment to highlight the experimental method. Tell students that you are going to test the assumption that eating chocolate will improve memory/recall. Ask them what their hypothesis might be? How would it be worded? Why? Give students the examples of the two hypotheses and explain the difference, along with 1 tailed/2 tailed. Divide the class in half, give one half chocolate, the other half are the control. Then complete a memory test. Show them the list of words for 30 seconds. They must then recall. Collate the results on the whiteboard. Ask the class to identify in the experiment: 1) What were the IV and DV? 2) How were these variables operationalized? 3) What participant design was used? If necessary explain IV/DV’s, Operationalisation & Participant Design. (NB. Most students will have studied psychology at GCSE so will have some knowledge). Ask students – can they think of any problems with the different participant designs? Ask for justification and lead on to explaining order effects. Now tell the students you are going to repeat the experiment to see if you get the same results. Complete it in the same way but this time swap groups - so that the group who didn’t eat the chocolate before get to eat it this time. Collate the findings Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. M: Collating results form class experiment.
  6. 6. again on the board. Compare the results… Ask ‘How similar are the results?’ ‘What does this suggest about our experiment?’ Lead on to issues of reliability. The experiment would be reliable if we got the same/similar results. Which type of experiment would be the most reliable? Why? Move on to objectivity/subjectivity. Get students to think about the chocolate they have eaten… they should write down: 1) What ingredients do you think make up the chocolate? What shape is it? What does it look like? (e.g. Objective) 2) How does it taste to you? Do you like it? What would you prefer? (e.g. Subjective) Explain the difference between objectivity and subjectivity. Ask… How objective was our experiment? Which type of experiment would be the most objective? Why? So we’ve already looked at our IV/DV… what other variables might have been present in our experiment that we can’t control? How might these have affected the results? Why? What about things that occur in the environment/situation? What about characteristics of participants. Explain different types of Extraneous variables that could occur. Which type of experiment would be most affected by extraneous variables? Students to now think about how useful experiments are in Psychology. Complete the match up sheet. They should match each type of experiment to the strength/weakness. Feedback and class discussion. Encourage higher abilities to think of their own evaluation points. How might we evaluate each of the types of experiment? Plenary: How far do you agree that experiments are the best method to use to study cognitive psychology? Round Robin – each student to contribute.
  7. 7. 5 Big Q: What experiments do we use in psychology and how useful are they? To UNDERSTAND the experimental design. To APPLY the experimental design to real life examples/experime nts. To EVALUATE the experimental design. To describe the main types of experiments, and key terms from the experimental method. To explain examples of each type of experiment, participant designs and hypotheses. To explain strengths and weaknesses of using each type of experiment in psychology. Experiments Consolidation Starter: Key term quiz/test. Read out a series of definitions from material last lesson. Student so write down the key words. Reveal answers & self assess. Outline big question: What experiments do we use in psychology and how useful are they? Students to set LO/SC or can use the same as last lesson if they were not achieved. Main Activities Present they hypothesis: Male participants will play more hours of video games in a week than female participants. Give each student three post it notes. They should write down the IV, DV and one possible EV for this hypothesis and stick it on the board. Teacher to read post it notes and question students based on their responses. Ask students to remind you of the different types of hypotheses. Outline the structure/template for each type of hypothesis. Present students with 2 research questions:  Does the attractiveness of an individual effect the level of punishment they receive for a crime?  Does the time of day affect performance on a word recall task? Students to write a directional and non directional hypothesis for each one. Target students to verbally share their hypotheses. Springboard question other students, ‘What do you think to that hypothesis?’ ‘Is that a good directional hypothesis?’ Split students into 3 groups. Give each group one of the following studies: Peterson & Peterson (1959), Baddeley (1966) and Bahrick et al (1975). Ask students to discuss and identify the key principles of the experimental method: What type of experiment was it? The Independent Variable & Dependent Variable (IV & DV). Any Extraneous Variables that may have influenced the results. Write a possible experimental and null hypothesis for the experiment. How were the variables operationalised? How reliable was the experiment? What was the participant design used? Elicit verbal feedback in which students outline the study and the experimental principles they have identified. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Key terms quiz, test, reading information on studies. W: Written tasks and exam question. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Group work.
  8. 8. Finish by applying their knowledge to exam questions. Students to choose from three exam questions depending on their LO/SC. Understand: (June 2011) ‘Describe what is meant by a natural experiment’ (2 marks) Apply: (June 2010) You want to investigate gender differences in the speed of texting on mobile phones in order to see who are the fastest, males or females. Cognitive psychology would suggest you use a laboratory experiment for this kind of investigation. Identify the independent variable (IV) and the dependent variable (DV) in this case. (2 marks) Evaluate (June 2010) Laboratory experiments have strengths and weaknesses. (i) Outline one strength of a laboratory experiment. (2 marks) (ii) Outline one weakness of a laboratory experiment. (2 marks) Students to peer assess/self assess using the mark scheme. 6 Big Q: How does the multistore model explain memory? To UNDERSTAND the multistore model of memory. To APPLY the multistore model to real life examples of memory. To ANALYSE the multistore model using evidence. To EVALUATE the multistore model. To describe the multistore model of memory, including the separate stores. To describe examples of the multistore model in real life. To explain evidence for and against the mulitstore model. To explain strengths and weaknesses of the multistore model. Multistore Model (Lesson 1 of 2) Starter: Display picture of the London Underground map. Ask students Is this an accurate representation of London? What is a Model? Can memory be represented in this way? Ask students to feedback verbally, ensuring that they justify and explain their answers. Outline big question. ‘How does the multistore model explain memory?’ Students to set their own LO’s/ SC. E.g. ‘Evaluate: by the end of the lesson I will be able to explain strengths and weaknesses of the multistore model of memory.’ Main activities: Card sort. Give students cards which form the multistore model. Ask them if they can construct it using their knowledge of memory so far. Get students to justify their model. Why have they assembled it their way? Reveal model and animation. Ask students based on what they already know about memory: 1) What do you think is the role of the sensory store? 2) What could happen in the short term memory store? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehending information – card sort. W: Written tasks and exam question C: Group work, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Collection and interpretation of results from class experiment. Primacy/recency graph.
  9. 9. 3) What do we already know about long term memory? Explain features of each memory store. Complete Sperling’s experiment as a class. Collate the results and ask students what this shows? What can we conclude from this experiment? Lead in to using this experiment as evidence for the sensory store of the multistore model. Complete the Glanzer & Cunitz experiment as a class. Students to see a number of words on the screen. They should then write them down from memory. Complete a graph of the group’s results as a class. Once the graph has been completed ask students to look at the shape of the graph? What does this tell us about memory? How does it link to the multistore model. Lead on to explaining the primacy/recency effect/serial position curve. Show clip of Clive Wearing. Ask students what this shows? How does this relate to the multistore model? What is A01 & A02 again? Which parts of your learning today can be used for A01 and which can be used for A02? How? Complete A01/A02 table so far – bullet points for each. Plenary: Exam question: Robert has just moved house and is trying to memorise his new postcode and telephone number. Using what you know about the MSM what advice can you give him? (3 marks). As a class feedback and discuss how the 3 marks would be awarded. Ask students to share their answers and mark as a class. If multiple answers are read out, ask students to compare/contrast. Which would get more marks? Why? How do they differ? 7 Big Q: How does the multistore model explain memory? To UNDERSTAND the multistore model of memory. To APPLY the multistore model to To describe the multistore model of memory, including the separate stores. To describe examples of the multistore model in real life. Multistore (Lesson 2 of 2) Starter: Display image of HM. Ask students to read the article and consider: Who was HM? What happened to him? How was his memory affected? Does this support or challenge the MSM of memory? Elicit verbal feedback from students. Ask students their ideas.. Get them to justify their answers, specifically on the last question. Ask, how would we use the study of HM for A02? Outline big question: ‘How does the multistore model explain memory?’ Students to set their own LO’s/ SC. Students may use the ones they set themselves last lesson if Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. R: Reading and comprehending information from article. W: Written tasks and exam answer. PEEL & essay paper chains. C: Class discussion Describe and evaluate one theory/model of memory other than Levels of Processing. (12 marks). Complete essay for homework.
  10. 10. real life examples of memory. To ANALYSE the multistore model using evidence. To EVALUATE the multistore model. To explain evidence for and against the mulitstore model. To explain strengths and weaknesses of the multistore model. they have not yet achieved them. Main Activities Give out MSM evaluation cards. Students in pairs must sort them into two groups: strengths and weaknesses. Feedback, students to justify and explain why they have placed each card into each group. Add new information to A01/A02 table. Present exam questions. Students to choose one to complete based on their LO’s/SC. Understand: Describe the key features of the multi store model of memory [6 marks] Evaluate: Evaluate the multi store model of memory in terms of its strengths and weakness [6 marks]. Peer/Self assess when finished. Extension: Consider: Explain why memory experiments may be criticised as lacking in validity. What could we include in this question? Discuss as a class. Display exam question: Describe and evaluate one theory/model of memory other than Levels of Processing. (12 marks). Explain that they need to know two models of memory. It is compulsory to learn LOP, however we can choose another model to teach. That other model is the multistore model. Get students to plan essay using one of two methods: 1) PEEL’s – Ask students to write paragraphs for their essays using PEEL’s/Elaboration ladders. 2) Essay Paperchains – On yellow strips of paper they should write A01 points, on green strips they should write A02 points, on blue slips they should write an introduction and conclusion. They should then use the pink slips to connect points together. These slips are for connectives ‘However, therefore, this suggests, this supports’ etc. Get them to think about the structure for their essays also. They could insert a blank pink slip for a change of paragraph. Swap plans and peer assess. Plenary: Lead on to peer discussion. What could we include in this essay? Why? How many points should be made? How do we achieve the full 6 A01 and the full 6 A02 marks. What does the mark scheme say about evaluation? (ensure that it is made clear that A02 should cover a range of points from methodology, practical applications, research studies and comparisons to other theories). Students to write Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. and verbal feedback throughout.
  11. 11. essay for homework. 8 Big Q: How does Levels of Processing explain memory? To UNDERSTAND the LOP model of memory. To APPLY the LOP model to real life examples of memory. To ANALYSE the LOP model. To EVALUATE the LOP model. To describe the LOP model of memory. To describe examples of the LOP model in real life. To compare and contrast the LOP model with the MSM by explaining differences and similarities. To explain strengths and weaknesses of the LOP model. LOP: Lesson 1 of 2. Starter: Ask students Why do we remember some things and not others? How do we decide which information to rehearse and therefore transfer to long term memory? Ask for feedback using questioning. Outline big question. ‘How does Levels of Processing explain memory?’ Students to set their own LO/SC in line with the skills. E.g. ‘Apply: by the end of the lesson I will be able to explain real life examples of the LOP model of memory.’ Main Activities: Explain that Craik and Lockhart didn’t think the Multistore model accounted for different types of mental processing and this led them to produce an alternative model. They argued there were two types of rehearsal. Display the two types of rehearsal. Ask students how this compares to the Multistore model. Elicit verbal ideas. Complete LOP experiment as a class using powerpoint. Explain instructions; students should look at each target word. After each target work there will be a question. Students should write down the answer to the question. Don’t tell them the aims of the experiment or that they will have a memory test for the words. After they have seen all the target words and answered the questions, students should write down as many of the target words as they can remember. Display the answers and collate results on the board. Ask students: How did you find that? Which words did you remember? Why do you think this is? What was the difference between the questions? Why was this difference important? Elicit class discussion. Independent learning. Students to research the following: 1) Understand: What is the LOP model and how does it explain memory? 2) Apply: How is the model useful to real life? 3) Analyse: How does it compare to the Multistore model? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension – research task. W: Written notes/tasks & exam answer. C: Class discussion and experiment. Verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of findings/results from experiments.
  12. 12. Similarities/Differences. 4) Evaluate: Higher abilities to start considering strengths/weaknesses of model. Feedback and class discussion. Assign one lead learner… this student should question/lead the class into producing a complete overview of the LOP model on the board. Teacher to further question and ask students for justification Plenary: Application of knowledge to an exam question. Psychologists were investigating the levels of processing model of memory. They presented participants with a list of words. After each word, there was a question the participants had to answer. There were three types of questions: A questions about the meaning of the words B questions about the sound of the words C questions about the appearance of the words For each type of question, A, B and C above, identify the level of processing that is involved in answering the questions. (3 marks) On completion, self assess. Class to discuss answers. 9 Big Q: How does Levels of Processing explain memory? To UNDERSTAND the LOP model of memory. To APPLY the LOP model to real life examples of memory. To ANALYSE the LOP model. To EVALUATE the LOP model. To describe the LOP model of memory. To describe examples of the LOP model in real life. To compare and contrast the LOP model with the MSM by explaining differences and similarities. To explain strengths and weaknesses of LOP AO2 & Essay Feedback: Lesson 2 of 2. Starter: Re-cap from last lesson. How do the Multistore model and LOP model compare? Spot the difference. Verbal feedback elicited through questioning. Outline Big question: (Cont. from last lesson). . ‘How does Levels of Processing explain memory?’ Students to set their own LO/SC in line with the skills – can be transferred from last lesson. Main Activities: Display SCOUT as a method for evaluating theories. Students to complete AO2 table filling out overall strengths, weaknesses, supporting evidence & challenging evidence. They are permitted to use the textbook. Teacher to elicit verbal feedback. Fill in Freud. Pass the Freud doll around. Each student to contribute one evaluative (AO2) of the theory. Teacher to ask Why? for justification. Students need to be able to expand on strengths and weaknesses and explain them in full. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehending exam answers and mark schemes. W: Written evaluation task and exam question. C: Fill in Freud, class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Essay: Describe and Evaluate the Levels of Processing Model of Memory (12 Marks)
  13. 13. the LOP model. Evidence they should cover: Craik & Tulving (1975), Hyde & Jenkins (1973), Morris (1977). Ask students: What is the main piece of evidence for LOP? Display GRAVE. Students to evaluate any key pieces of evidence/studies using this acronym. Students should focus on the methods used. Teacher to elicit verbal feedback through questioning. Students to assess their progress against the success criteria. What have you learned? How do you know? How much progress have you made towards your success criteria? Explain that students will be answering another essay question for homework: Describe and Evaluate the Levels of Processing Model of Memory (12 Marks) But first you want to give them some feedback from their MSM essay. Hand out the generic mark scheme for a 12 marker. Students should underline/highlight key words and make a list of how to get 6 AO1 marks and 6 AO2 marks. Construct student friendly mark scheme on the board from their ideas. Ask students for justification, ‘Why do you think that is important?’ ‘How can we demonstrate that?’ Give students 2 example essays. Using the mark scheme, for each one they should note down: 1) What is good about it? (Content, structure, links, expression, presentation). 2) What could be improved about it? 3) What mark would it get? Why? Once they have written their ideas down, they should share with a peer. Class feedback. Teacher to question. What’s good about? What could be improved? How could they have done that? What mark band would it fall into? Why? Reveal actual marks. What have students learned from this? Give exemplar answer and feedback from examiner’s reports. What can they take away from this? Plenary: Students to write down one thing they will do/one target for their LOP essay. If time permits, start to plan the essay.
  14. 14. 10 Big Q: What did Craik & Tulving do and find? To UNDERSTAND Craik & Tulving’s Study. To APPLY Craik & Tulving’s study to theories of memory. To ANALYSE Craik & Tulving’s study. To EVALUATE Craik & Tulving’s study. To identify and describe the aim, procedure, findings and conclusion of Craik & Tulving’s study. To explain how Craik & Tulving’s study relates to theories of memory. To explain how reliable Craik & Tulving’s study is by comparing it to a replication. To explain strengths and weaknesses of Craik & Tulving’s study. LOP Key Study Starter: Give feedback from LOP essay. Give out exemplar and answer and feedback from examiner’s report. Students to compare this to their own essay. What do they notice? What are their key targets for next time? Outline big question. What did Craik & Tulving do and find? Students to produce their own SC/LO. E.g. Understand: To describe the APFC of Craik & Tulving’s study. Main Activities: Explain that this is one of the compulsory key studies they need to know in detail. Students to work through the following tasks: 1) Understand: Create key study bunting by outlining the Aim, Procedure, Findings, Conclusion. 2) Apply: Which theory does this support and how? 3) Analyse: Replicate their study on a handful of sixth formers in the common room. Students should make their own materials and complete the study on a much smaller scale. Work out the average results for each level of processing. Compare your results to Craik and Tulving’s. How different are the results? Why might this be? 4) Evaluate: Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the study using GRAVE. Students to feedback verbally. Teacher to question and probe. Plenary: Application to exam question. (June 2012): You will have learned about one of the following studies in detail from cognitive psychology: Peterson and Peterson (1959) Craik and Tulving (1975) Ramponi et al (2004) Choose one study from the list. (a) Describe the procedure of your chosen study. (4 marks) (b) Outline one weakness of your chosen study. (2 marks) Peer assess against the mark scheme. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehending information and exam answers. W: Written tasks and application to exam question. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of experimental findings. 11 Big Q: How should the cognitive practical be conducted? To UNDERSTAND what is required from the cognitive To describe what is required for the practical element. To explain how they will conduct their practical by Introduce Practical on LOP/MSM Starter: Give students excerpt from the specification which specifically outlines the practical element. Students to read. Teacher to ask: What do you have to do for this practical? Which method should be used? Outline big question: How should the cognitive practical be conducted/completed? Students to set their own LO/SC/Aims for the lesson. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions R: Reading and comprehension. Knowledge of key terms. W: Written plan and ideas. Complete experiment and write up the introduction, method and results sections in
  15. 15. practical. To APPLY features of experiments to their own practical. To EVALUATE plans for the practical. referring to features of experiments. To assess own/peer’s plans, suggesting improvements. Main Activities: Explain that the cognitive practical must be an experiment. Ask: What are ethics? How should we control for them? What are the other features of experiments which we must consider? Teacher to question and elicit verbal feedback. Display list of features of experiments. Ask students to self assess their knowledge against the list. Is there anything they are unsure of/need to work on? Explain that students should conduct a practical investigating either the MSM or LOP models of memory. They could replicate an already existing study if they wish. Students should now brainstorm ideas. Teacher to encourage feedback of these ideas. Class discussion. How feasible are their ideas? Students should plan out their study in detail using the prompts. They should fill out the planning booklet. Peer assess: Students to peer assess each other’s ideas. What is good about the plan: Have they missed anything? What could be improved? Feedback: Teacher to ask for the sharing of ideas. Probe and question further. What will be your aim then? What do you predict will happen? Why? Explain that they must complete their practical and write it up within the next two weeks. Issue them with a write up structure sheet. They must complete their experiment and write up the introduction, method and results section of their report and bring it to class in two weeks’ time. with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. report format. They must bring this to lesson 15!! 12 Big Q: How does Cue Dependent theory explain forgetting? To UNDERSTAND Cue Dependent Forgetting. To APPLY Cue Dependent Forgetting to real life examples. To describe main features of the Cue Dependent Forgetting theory. To explain Cue Dependent Forgetting with reference to examples. To explain evidence for and against Cue Cue Dependent Forgetting AO1: Lesson 1 of 2. Starter: Have you ever experienced ‘tip of the tongue’ phenomenon? Or travelled down the stairs to get something only to completely forget what it was once you get down... Why does this happen? Elicit verbal feedback through questioning. Outline the big question: ‘How does Cue Dependent theory explain forgetting?’ Students to set their own LO/SC. E.g. ‘Apply: To explain cue dependent forgetting using real life examples.’ NB explain that this will stretch across 2 lessons. Main Activities: Class experiment. Students to see a number of images on the screen. Individually Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & R: Reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout.
  16. 16. To ANALYSE evidence for and against Cue Dependent Forgetting. To EVALUATE Cue Dependent Forgetting. Dependent Forgetting theory, To explain strengths & weaknesses of Cue Dependent Theory. when they see each image they should write down the first thing that they think of/remember. Class discussion. Students to contribute their memories/thoughts. NB. Could also bring in objects such as party-food. E.g. Party rings etc and ask what they think of first.. Ask: Why might these objects help us to recall memories from our childhood? Students to explain their ideas verbally. Springboard questioning. ‘How far do you agree with that? Why?’ Try to elicit that memory can be recalled through triggers/cues. Outline the key assumptions of Cue Dependent forgetting, including the Encoding Specificity Principle. Class experiment 2: Use powerpoint to show a number of countries. For each one students should write down the capital city. Once complete, repeat again with the second set of slides. These slides have the first letter of each capital city on. Check their answers against the answers slide. Ask students how their answers compared between round 1 and 2. Which did they score better on? Why? Elicit verbal feedback and class discussion. Explain that according to this theory there are two types of cues. State and context. Ask students to explain their ideas. Independent study task. Students should use the textbook and/or the internet to research the following: 1) What is mean by context dependent forgetting? 2) What is meant by state-dependent forgetting? 3) Describe any research evidence to support both context dependent forgetting and state dependent forgetting. Main evidence they should consider: Godden & Baddeley (1975), Smith (1985), Duka et al (2000) & Lang et al (2001). self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. M: Interpretation of experimental results.
  17. 17. They should fill out the grid worksheet. Elicit verbal feedback and question students to assess understanding. Ask open questions to allow for extended answers ‘Tell me about…’ Plenary: Answer practice exam question: Explain one theory of forgetting (4 marks). Peer assess using mark scheme and discuss as a class. 13 Big Q: How does Cue Dependent theory explain forgetting? To UNDERSTAND Cue Dependent Forgetting. To APPLY Cue Dependent Forgetting to real life examples. To ANALYSE evidence for and against Cue Dependent Forgetting. To EVALUATE Cue Dependent Forgetting. To describe main features of the Cue Dependent Forgetting theory. To explain Cue Dependent Forgetting with reference to examples. To explain evidence for and against Cue Dependent Forgetting theory, To explain strengths & weaknesses of Cue Dependent Theory. Cue Dependent AO2: Lesson 2 of 2. Starter: Explain that this lesson is a continuation of the previous. Re-cap over big question and lesson objectives/success criteria. Re-cap as a class the main features of Cue Dependent Theory. Elicit verbal feedback and key terms: State, Context, Encoding Specificity Principle. Main Activities: Ask students to remind you what AO2 is. Elicit the word evaluation. Then ask: On what grounds can we evaluate a theory? E.g. practical applications, methods, studies etc… Display the SCOUT model. Ask students in pairs to use SCOUT as prompt for evaluation. They should write down as many strengths and weaknesses as they can. Elicit initial ideas from students. Ask them to justify by asking why? Why is that an issue? Now display second set of prompts: 1) Can we relate to it in real life? 2) What are the downsides of relying on experimental evidence? 3) Are there any circumstances where state and context cues might be the same? 4) How is this theory useful to students like you? Ask students to consider these and again in pairs discuss and compile any evaluation points they can think of. Elicit verbal feedback of ideas. Elect a lead learner to lead the feedback and compile a mind map/list on the whiteboard. Display outline of Abernethy (1940) study. Ask one student to read out loud. Then ask… what does this suggest about Cue Dependent Theory? How is this a good study? How does it compare to previous research evidence? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Team work in the form of BAAM. M: Interpretation of experimental results. Plan and carry out a small study. To test Cue Dependent Theory. Record results and bring to next lesson.
  18. 18. Show clip: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7870132.stm Ask students what relevance this has to Cue Dependent Theory. Elicit verbal ideas and provoke class discussion. Exam Question: Evaluate one theory of forgetting (4 marks). Students to peer assess/self-assess against the mark scheme. Discuss as a class how to answer a question like this. Introduce homework for next lesson. Plan a small-scale experiment on context or state dependent forgetting. Students should conduct it on three people and record the results. They need to bring the results to next lesson. If time permits, they may start planning this. Plenary: Play BAAM. Split class into two groups. Using BAAM game powerpoint, each group to choose a question to answer. Behind each question is a question worth a particular sum of money. If they answer it correctly they win the money. If however they choose a Q with a BAAM behind it then all of their winnings they have won up to that point get wiped out. It is the team with the most money left at the end which wins. 14 Big Q: What did Godden & Baddeley do and find? To UNDERSTAND Godden & Baddeley’s study To APPLY Godden & Baddeley’s study to theories of forgetting. To EVALUATE Godden & Baddeley’s study. To describe the Aim, Procedure, Findings & Conclusion of Godden & Baddeley’s study. To explain what Godden & Baddeley’s study suggests about forgetting. To discuss strengths and weaknesses of Godden & Baddeley’s study. Godden & Baddeley Key Study Starter: Re-cap on experiments and CDF: Students to use the results of their experiment to note down:  What was cue dependent forgetting?  What experiments did you conduct?  Did you test for context or state dependent recall? How?  What were your findings?  Do they support or challenge the theory of Cue Dependent Forgetting?  What can you conclude overall? Outline big Q: What did Godden & Baddeley do and find? Students to select their own LO/SC. E.g. Apply: To explain what Godden & Baddeley’s study suggests about memory/forgetting. Main Activities: Write down everything you can remember about Godden & Baddeley’s study so far? Students should have already touched upon this in CDF lesson. Elicit verbal feedback. Hand out deconstruction jigsaw sheet. Students must fill out the 4 parts of the jigsaw in detail. Each piece represented a piece of the study they should know in detail – Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. Study deconstruction. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Fill in Freud. M: Interpretation of experimental results. Describe and evaluate the Cue Dependent theory of Forgetting (12 marks).
  19. 19. Aim, Procedure, Findings, Conclusion. Once completed the jigsaw they should stick it onto a large sheet of paper and annotate it according to the skills: Apply: How does this study apply to theories of memory/forgetting/previous learning? Analyse: How can this study be used for AO2 supporting/challenging evidence? Can it be used to evaluate a theory? Evaluate: How can this study be evaluated in terms of methodology? Think GRAVE. Verbal feedback Fill in Freud. Students to pass the Freud doll around the room. When students have the Freud doll they must choose one think to share about what they have learned so far. Once they have explained, they pass the doll on to another student and they contribute a point. Continue until all students have contributed. Question students to fill in the gaps. Ensure that as a class, the different skills are discussed. Quiz: Students to create 1- 3 questions to test the class on this study. They must write the question and answer down. Use the questions to conduct a class quiz – can be done in teams/groups. Plenary: Exam Q: You will have learned about a number of studies from the Cognitive Approach. Answer the following questions using one study you have learned. a) Identify one study from the Cognitive Approach. (1 mark) b) Describe the findings (results and/or conclusions) of the study you identified in (a). (4 marks) c) (c) Outline one strength of the study you identified in (a). (2 marks) Self-assess/peer asses against mark scheme and discuss as a class. 15-16 ICT Facilities Required Big Q: How does Trace Decay theory explain forgetting? To UNDERSTAND how Trace Decay explains forgetting. To APPLY Trace Decay to examples of forgetting To describe features of trace decay. To describe examples of forgetting using trace decay. To explain similarities and Trace Decay Starter: Class experiment. Show a series of trigrams on the powerpoint. After each one has been shown, students should count backwards when they see the count screen. They will then be asked to recall the word by writing it down. The counting interval increases as the test goes on. Once complete, check answers and display the questions: What were the results? Why? What might this experiment suggest about forgetting? Students to discuss first then elicit verbal feedback and ideas. If ideas aren’t generated, ask about the counting interval? Why were they asked to do this? What effect did this have? Did they notice anything about the interval? Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam R: Reading and comprehension of information from research. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal Describe and evaluate trace decay as a theory of forgetting (12 marks)
  20. 20. To ANALYSE Trace Decay with Cue Dependent Forgetting. To EVALUATE Trace Decay as a theory of forgetting. differences between trace decay theory and cue dependent forgetting. To explain strengths, weaknesses and evidence for/against trace decay theory of forgetting. Outline big Q: How does trace decay theory explain forgetting? Students to set their own LO/SC. Main Activities: Split class into pairs – Give each pair one of the question sheets. They are all slightly different – can give pairs different questions depending on ability level. Students to research and find answers to each of the questions. This can be done on computer. Give them limited time to do this. Arrange the room so that each pair can speed date each other. In each speed date, each pair must exchange one piece of information on trace decay. This should enable each of the pairs to fill out their answer sheet. Encourage them to ask questions and explain to each other. Elicit verbal feedback and class discussion. Ask students to explain one thing they have learned about trace decay from another student… Draw out key terms. E.g. Memory Trace, Engram. NB: Alternatively one student could be elected as Lead Learner to lead the feedback on the board. They must cover both A01 & A02 Consolidation task – based on success criteria. As a consolidation students could choose one of the following to complete: Analyse – Compare with Cue Dependent Forgetting in terms of similarities and differences. Evaluate – Evaluate trace decay theory using strengths, weaknesses and research evidence. Elicit verbal feedback. Focus on evaluation. Give out Waugh et al’s study (sheet). Ask students to read the study. Question them.. What does this suggest about Trace Decay? How would we use this study in a 12 marker? (Can be used as AO2 contradictory evidence). Plenary: Exam Q: a) Describe one theory of forgetting you have studied within cognitive psychology other than the cue dependent theory. (4 marks) b) Outline one strength and one weakness of the theory you described in (a). (4 marks) Students to peer assess/self-assess. question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. feedback throughout. Speed dating – pair communication.
  21. 21. 17 First draft of practical so far due in. Big Q: How will I be assessed on my practical? To UNDERSTAND how the practical will be assessed. To APPLY their practical to exam questions. To EVALUATE the practical in terms of methods. To describe how the practical will be assessed in the exam. To answer practise exam questions on the practical. To explain methodological strengths and weaknesses of the practical. Practical Evaluation/Practical Exam Questions Hand in of first section Starter: Anything interesting? Students to share the results of their practical with another student. Did they find anything interesting? Verbal feedback and class discussion. Outline big Q: How will I be assessed on my practical? Main Activities: Re-cap on report. What should they have included – go over sections. Explain that at first we are going to work on the final part of the practical. The discussion. Ask students: What might go in the discussion section of a research report? Elicit verbal feedback. A discussion section should discuss what they found by relating it back to theory. It should also evaluate the report/research and suggest improvements if it were to be carried out again. How do we evaluate a study? Try to elicit GRAVE. Students to independently evaluate the methodology of their study using this. Students should make a bullet pointed list reflecting on the generalizability, reliability, application, validity, and ethics of their practical. Elicit verbal feedback on evaluation points getting them to explain. Why is that a problem/strength? Students to write one weakness of their practical on a large sheet of paper. Students to rotate, suggesting solutions for each of the weaknesses by writing it on the relevant sheets. Elicit verbal feedback. ‘If I were to repeat my research/practical again I would…’ Highlight key words. ‘What would be the best way to increase reliability/validity/generalisability?’ etc. Practice exam questions: Students to have a go at a series of practice exam questions on their practical. Examples include: (June 2010): As part of the course requirements for cognitive psychology you will have conducted an experiment. Outline the aim/purpose of your experiment.(2 marks) (January 2011): As part of the course requirements for cognitive psychology you will have conducted a practical using an experiment. Evaluate your experiment. You may wish to look at: your sample, how you controlled variable, your research design decisions, and any ethical issues. (5 marks) Additional questions can be found on the edexcel website. Questions could be used as part of a carousel exercise in groups. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks, written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. M: Interpretation of experimental results. Write the discussion section of their report – including evaluation of their research. Due in 1 week.
  22. 22. Plenary: Once finished peer assess/self assess and discuss criteria for success as a class. 18 – 19 ICT and research facilities required. Big Q: Is EWT reliable? To UNDERSTAND research into and factors influencing EWT. To APPLY research findings to the key issue is EWT reliable? To ANALYSE research into EWT. To EVALUATE research into EWT. To describe research and factors influencing EWT. To explain research in relation to the reliability of EWT? To compare and contrast research into the reliability of EWT to form a conclusion. To explain strengths and weaknesses of research into EWT. Key issue: Is EWT Reliable? (Focus on what EWT is, Leading Questions & Weapon Focus) Starter: Play the perception awareness test on powerpoint. Ask students to count how many times the players dressed in white pass the ball. Once finished ask them if they noticed the gorilla? Play back the clip. Ask students what this experiment tells us? How might it link to cognitive psychology? Elicit verbal feedback. Explain that as part of the course students must be able to describe and evaluate a key issue. Explain that it is a key question: Is Eye Witness Testimony reliable? As a result students need to know arguments for and against this statement. Outline big Q: How far is eye witness testimony reliable? Students to set their own LO/SC. Main Activities: Ask students to think, pair, share: What is eye witness testimony and why is it important? Elicit verbal feedback and class discussion. Come up with a definition as a class. As a class go through the either the Mr. Bean or Whodunnitclip. Ask students to suggest what this says about EWT. Elicit verbal feedback. Conduct Loftus and Palmer experiment as a class – using powerpoint as a guide. Once finished, ask students what this suggests about EWT? Reliable or not? Why? Independent group task: Is EWT reliable? Students in groups should research the issue of EWT and based on their research, form a conclusion on how reliable it is. They should create a presentation on their findings and conclusion to present to the class next lesson. Students must research and consider: - Factors affecting EWT, and should include Leading Questions and Weapon focus predominantly. - Research evidence from Loftus (Leading Q’s & Weapon Focus), Clifford & Hollin (1981), Pickel (1998) at a minimum. - Any other evidence they can find to formulate their conclusion. Give each group the research article/journals to help them. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of information during research task. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. Think, pair, share. M: Interpretation of experimental results. Describe and evaluate research into the key issue you have studied. (12 marks).
  23. 23. Students must also consider the success criteria to help them reach their LO: - Understand – Describe research into EWT. - Apply – Explain the research terms of the key issue - reliability of EWT - Analyse – Compare and contrast research to forma conclusion - Evaluate – Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of research into EWT. Students to present their presentations to the class. A competition element could be added for the group that worked the best together/the most conclusive presentation/most detailed presentation. Teacher to question students throughout presentations – getting them to justify their points. Evoke class discussion where opportunities arise. Plenary: Exam Q (Jan 2011): (a) You will have studied a key issue from the Cognitive Approach. Describe one key issue from the Cognitive Approach. (4 marks) (b) Imagine there has been a TV programme about the key issue you have described in (a). You receive an e-mail from your friend about the programme. Write a short e-mail that you could send to your friend to help explain this key issue using one concept (idea, theory or research) from the Cognitive Approach. (3 marks). Students to peer assess/self-assess against mark scheme. 20 To revise knowledge and understanding of the cognitive approach. UNDERSTAND APPLY ANALYSE EVALUATE CREATE N/A Revision Lesson Success criteria selected by students. Suggested strategies for revision lesson(s): Revision booklet – Students to fill out independently. Quiz – QR codes? Practice Exam Questions & examiner’s reports Thinking ladder tasks based on skills: Understand Apply, Analyse, Evaluate, and Create – for any given topic which students wish to revise. Making revision materials. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehension of information. W: Written tasks, key terms and written exam answer. C: Class discussion and verbal feedback throughout. 21 To apply learning to a mock N/A Cognitive Assessment N/A W: Applying knowledge to
  24. 24. assessment. Students to complete timed assessment – under exam conditions. Ask CLR for copy of assessment. write exam answers. 22 To reflect on and improve cognitive assessment. N/A DIRT, Reflection & Improvements LO: Students can set their own success criteria based on the grades/marks they want to improve their assessment to/by. ‘By the end of the lesson I want to improve my assessment by _____ grades/marks.’ Students to use mark scheme to improve their assessment in a different colour. They should reflect on their progress and set targets by filling out their progress trackers. Improved assessments to be stored using treasury tags in individual progress trackers. Objectives shared and referred to throughout the lesson Positive Student Interaction class discussions, verbal feedback and individual discussions with students throughout range of activities. Application to exam question. Peer assessment & self-assessment when reading self and others work. Reference to mark scheme. R: Reading and comprehending mark scheme. W: Improving written answers.

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