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    Resourcd File Resourcd File Presentation Transcript

    • Exemplar Scheme of Learning (May 2012) The new SoL will be in a booklet form that every member of staff will have. Copies will also be available on the U drive. Booklets will consist of: 1. Contents Page 2. Relevant assessment levels 3. Success Criteria (golden ticket) 4. DIRT / T&L strategies (provided by DGW/RND) 5. Curriculum Map linked to skills not content 6. BLP – 4 R’s Reflective, resourcefulness, resilience, reciprocity (provided by Lynne Harris) 7. Each topic / SoL front sheet for assessment focus including AFL ladders New Scheme template Subject: Sociology – Paper 1: Research Methods Year: 11 Allocated time/No. of lessons: 16 lessons/ 14 weeks Lesson No. Differentiated Learning Objectives Success Criteria Differentiated activities which promote active independent learning AFL strategies / feedback & dialogue Links to RWCM Homework 1 Basic principles of research C – Know research methods and types of data B – Describe research methods and data types using examples A – Explain how research methods C – Learners can state research methods and types of data B – Learners can describe research methods and data types using examples A – Learners can explain how Starter: Ask pupils to identify ways the following professionals/groups find out information – Scientists, journalists, police, historians, and celebrity fans – feedback and introduce lesson objectives. Give students Sociological research methods sheet (story), students to read though it and make a glossary listing all the words in bold. Following the story – try to elicit the meaning of each term from what the story says, if students need support or for clarification use textbook, and write down the meaning of each term. Explain that we will come across all of these in more detail as we go through the course. Students in groups, get given a scenario of a sociological question to research. Using basic knowledge of research methods, create a poster outlining how they might go about it and why they would choose that method. Each group presents ideas to class and peers to offer feedback and suggestions – to begin students’ thinking of practical Find an example of a survey or questionnaire to bring in - for lesson 3
    • and data could be used in a real research situation research methods and data could be used in a real research situation issues with research. Plenary: key term bingo – students choose 9 of the new words, teacher reads out definition and they tick off if they believe they have they appropriate key word in their grid. 2 Ethics of experiments C – Outline types of experiment B – Describe ethical issues in experiments A – Explain the why experiments aren’t used much in sociology C – Learners can describe types of experiment B – Learners can describe ethical issues in experiments A – Learners can explain the why experiments aren’t used much in sociology Starter: If you were a scientist/sociologist what experiments could you utilise twins for? What might a study of twins help you to find out? Feedback as a class, referring to key terms from last lesson. Watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gwnzW4jOMI – video interview of twins separated at birth in secret study. Students to make notes of the story within this video – a sociological experiment to separate 2 twins. Discuss with pupils: was it illegal in NY State at that time? Is it now? Why is it classed as unethical? – Display a definition of ethical and generate ethical issues. Could the results be useful for a sociologist? How long would this study take? What are the possible pitfalls? What would such an experiment be trying to prove? – Why would a sociologist want to study it this why – why did they think it was better than if they knew – try to elicit a layman’s term of Hawthorne effect Read p28-29 Active Sociology – Answer questions 1-3 on the main text. Then as a class work through the questions based upon the field experiment. Plenary: What might the best way to study human behaviour ethically and without the Hawthorne effect be? Encourage differences in ideas ensuring students justify their choices 3 Devising a questionnaire C – Describe features of a questionnaire B – Design a suitable questionnaire A – Assess strengths and weaknesses of questionnaires C – Learners can describe features of a questionnaire B – Learners can design a suitable questionnaire A – Learners can weigh up the strengths and weaknesses of questionnaires Starter: Review homework from lesson 2. Pupils identify different types of questions, ways they are presented, and information type gathered (focus on qualitative v quantitative). Pupils could suggest what the aim of the survey might have been. Show examples of bad questionnaires – pick out the bad features and why they aren’t useful – how could they be improved? Use instructions on making questionnaires p31 Active Sociology and copied from Browne p427, Pupils pick a topic from the following list and design a questionnaire in pairs/threes – they should all write their own copy. Also use how to design a questionnaire sheet. Topics: expected careers for males and females; attitudes towards sex and relationships; attitudes towards family; attitudes towards the elderly; attitudes towards deviant behaviour in schools; opinions of adults on teenagers; attitudes of pupils to school; television habits and attitudes to exercise; how family background affects education and career choices. Survey must include: an introduction with instructions; different types of questions – closed, graded and open; on a separate Students to conduct their questionnaire – results to be in by lesson 9
    • document – information on what you want to find out. Plenary: Ask groups to explain their survey to another pair/group. Listening group to offer advice on how to improve or what else they would add. Review as a class. 4 Sampling C - Identify different forms of sampling. B - Give reasons why different types of sampling are used A - Explain weaknesses and strengths of different forms of sampling C – Learners can state different forms of sampling. B - Learners can give reasons why different types of sampling are used A – Learners can explain weaknesses and strengths of different forms of sampling Starter: What is the question? (Jeopardy). Have on board following words and challenge pupils to ask questions with those words as the answers. Questionnaire. Sociological experiment. Validity. Reliability. Social Control. Socialisation. Feedback from starter. Refer back to questionnaire from previous lesson. Ask pupils to decide who they would want to answer these questions, and how they would arrange this. Feedback from groups. Would it be possible to ask every person of a particular age group or job background their opinions? Read p32-33 Active Sociology with pupils – they should write a short definition of each sampling types in the gap on sampling with skittles sheet – and after each definition – they follow the instructions to carry out that type of sampling using skittles sweets. Extension: For each type of sample try to identify a strength and a weakness for using that method – use these in evaluation at end of sheet and sampling exercises. For snowball and quota sampling – students to write a definition and come up with what type of research these would be most useful for. Groups to work on a sampling frame – or other method of producing a sample. Be prepared to explain: choice of sample type, how respondents would be selected, size of sample group, where you would access your sample, when you would get the information, problems you might encounter. Plenary: Teacher Q and A based upon groups own sample frames. Link back to outcomes. On-going questionnaire 5 Interviews/ questionnaires C - Know the difference between interview types B Identify ways of combating interview bias. A – assess strengths and weaknesses of interviews C – Learners can state the difference between interview types B – Learners can suggest ways of combating interview bias. A – Learners can weigh up the strengths and Starter: Refer back to You Tube video – The Hour and the Twins separated at birth (and/or use another clip from a chat show - http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=pA4dKIS4wSs). Ask pupils to write down similarities and differences between a questionnaire and the chat show. Feedback from starter – Highlight that a chat show is an example of a structured interview in some ways (and suggest how it could become unstructured). What would you expect an interviewer to do before the interview? Ask pupils about problems with Interviews – Easily highlighted by Ali’s response. Ask pupils what other issues there may be. Brainstorm strengths/weakness of both interview types – use textbook for support if needed. Pupils to rewrite the strengths and weaknesses in their own words and in rank order (biggest strength/weakness down lo least strong or weak). Brainstorm ways to help remove interview bias). Review as a class. Conduct interview if feasible
    • weaknesses of interviews Who would be a good person to interview based upon your group’s research project? Ask pupils to consider and feedback. Plenary: Pupils to prepare for a guest interviewee (who hopefully they could access to carry out interview) and write up questions that they would like to be answered. Ask pupils to consider possible supplementary questions. 6 Observations C - Outline a case study of observation in practice. B - Suggest strengths and weaknesses of observational research. A - Identify problems and suggest solutions for researchers using observation C – Learners can describe a case study of observation in practice. B – Learners can suggest strengths and weaknesses of observational research. A - Learners can give problems and suggest solutions for researchers using observation Starter: Project on the board images connected to observation. Ask pupils which they think is the odd one out, or which could be used for sociology. Images to projects: eyes, glasses, telescope, camera, video/film camera. Ask pupils - What do the images have in common? How could observation be useful in sociological research? Individually, read p36 and complete questions in full sentences. Review answers. Class to read p37 and the 1960s covert participant observation. Ask pupils to write a 100-125 word summary of James Patrick’s ‘A Gang Observed’ study. Discuss questions: why might a researcher of such as teenage gangs not reveal his real name? If a researcher keeps covert secrecy, does s/he become obliged to fully take part in the activity? What are the ethical dilemmas? Letting time pass before publishing assists other’s anonymity and possible risks to the researcher – should a researcher protect those researched? Participant observation is demanding – how can such research go wrong – what problems may be faced? Extension: p49 Active sociology. Pupils complete tasks on Ch. 4’s Baka – people of the rainforest documentary. Pupils in groups to complete the Find out for yourself activity – helping a girl with her coursework on boys behaviour at football matches. Plenary: Ask each group to decide if observation would be useful evidence for their research project. 50 word answer – yes or no with reasons to support opinion. Share with class. Read Humphreys tearoom trade study – what were the ethical issues? 7 Prepare for an observation C - Prepare a plan for a successful observation. B - Identify a school/youth group based issue for observational research C – Learners can plan a successful observation. B – Learners can suggest a school/youth group based issue for observational research A – Learners can Starter: Hawthorne Effect – What is it? Ask pupils to check through their notes until they can answer this question. Then ask pupils to suggest how this effect may also affect observations. Discuss with pupils where they are most likely to be a ‘participant’. How does this compare to non-participant? Recap covert and overt observation. Ask groups to consider a school based group (or class) or other organisation they participate in. What could they try to find out by observation? E.g. how many boys answer questions? How many pupils shout out? How people work together? Who the teacher talks to first or most? How the pupils respond to the task? How people organise themselves into groups? Discuss with class: Pupils to work out if observation would be useful. Would it work the same if others knew you were observing? Should the teacher or group leader On-going questionnaire, and observations to be carried out – by lesson 9
    • A - Identify ethical issues connected to the observation. describe ethical issues connected to the observation know? What things would be easiest and best to observe? Differences between boys and girls in lessons/activities. Ask pupils to identify a hypothesis – what you would expect to find out from your observations? Decide on when and where the observation will take place? How many in your group will participate at once? Plenary: Review hypotheses and plans from each group. Ask other groups to consider ethical issues they can see. 8 Official Statistics C - Explain the difference between primary and secondary data. B – Identify problems faced when using official statistics. A - Analyse data from the Social trends 2008. C – Learners can state the difference between primary and secondary data. B – Learners can identify problems faced when using official statistics. A – Learners can explain data from the Social trends 2008. Starter: Bias – What is it? Pose well-known statistic - 9/10 cats prefer Whiskas. Would you trust this claim? Why? Why not? Who pays for official surveys to be carried out? What might this tell us? Read Active Sociology pg 38-39. Ask pupils to write a definition of Primary and of Secondary data. Ask pupils to consider the research they’ve done in this unit – What will fit into primary and secondary data groups? Complete task on ‘Suicide’ from Browne textbook and how it relates to the use of official statistics. Read p38-39 – Answer qs 1-3 in full sentences. Extension: Complete Task on coursework above the 3 questions. Extension 2: Give pupils the graphs and tables from Social Trends. Ask them to write down a. what they can find out from the data and b. questions a sociologist might want to ask based upon this data. Plenary: http://www.doula.org.uk/content/duk/about/Survey_Results.asp Project the results of a survey by Doula. What do we learn? What is there agenda? What problems can you see with the data? Is it primary or secondary data? 9-10 Presenting findings/data C - Read a graph/bar chart and interpret data B – Present own data in a bar chart and other form of graph A - Explain issues connected to own questionnaires and C – Learners can read a graph/bar chart and interpret data B – Learners can present own data in a bar chart and other form of graph A – Learners can explain issues connected to own questionnaires and Starter: Review homework tasks (talk in groups about what they have found out). Successes? Problems? Things to think about? Answer questions based upon the graphs and table on p40-41 of Active sociology Feedback. Link back to previous lesson on official statistics. Recap quantitative and qualitative evidence – Is there any data that cannot be used in graphs and tables? Groups to work together to present the information gathered from their own questionnaires and observations Prepare presentation – what can you conclude from your research? Write a summary. Plenary: Present findings from research to the whole class. Review strengths and weaknesses of questionnaires and observations done. Focus on: reliability, validity, representativeness and ethics.
    • observations. observations. 11 Qualitative/ quantitative secondary sources C – Identify what qualitative/qualitati ve sources can tell us B - Explain different sources of qualitative/quantita tive secondary data. A - Analyse the strengths and weakness of qualitative/quantita tive sources C – Learners can state what qualitative/qualitati ve sources can tell us B – Learners can explain different sources of qualitative/quantita tive secondary data. A – Learners can weigh up the strengths and weakness of qualitative/quantita tive sources Starter: Hand out the excerpts of the diary to pupils. Ask them to read the diary extract and then in pairs write a summary of what society is like at that time. They should also write further questions they have, in order to validate the information. Discuss. If the information valid? Is it a reliable source? What might make a diary not so useful? Introduce Content Analysis. Focus on films and newspapers. Films could be localised e.g. Brassed Off and Full Monty based around South Yorkshire. Watch an extended clip or the film (available on youtube). Ask pupils to count up references to strikes. hardship, swearwords, work, government etc. What type of data has been produced? Introduce semiology – how do camera angles, words used etc give a particular impression? What type of data is this producing? Which do you think is most useful from a sociological perspective? Why? Encourage references to validity, etc. Students to draw a table with qualitative and quantitative and strengths/weaknesses, and work together to come up with as many ideas as possible. Feedback as a class and allow students to add to their tables. Plenary: Copy and complete the sentences: 1. Two examples of qualitative secondary data are… 2. When using this type of data sociologists need to be wary of… 3. Quantitative data can be produced from a study of the Mass Media by using … Complete a simple content analysis based upon ideas on p43 of Active Sociology. 12 Pilot, longitudinal and case studies C – Define pilot, longitudinal and case studies B - Describe what can be learned from these studies. A – Assess the strengths/weakness es of these studies. C – Learners can state what pilot, longitudinal and case studies are B – Learners can describe what can be learned from these studies. A – Learners can give the strengths/weakness es of these studies. Starter: Card sort – match key words with definitions. Questionnaire, Interview, Case Study, Validity, pilot study, Research, Reliability, Official Statistics, Social Trends, Longitudinal studies. Feedback from starter. Identify new terms of Pilot studies and longitudinal studies. Pilot: What would be useful? What would be difficult? Link back to own questionnaire/observation – would this have been useful? How? Longitudinal - What would be useful? What would be difficult? How could TV help in this type of study? Read p44 Longitudinal studies. Write 3 sentences explaining what they are, and why they are useful for sociologists. Watch You Tube clip – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ct5tyUnRpc – longitudinal study in 70s – discuss what something like this could show sociologists. Recap Case Studies – feral children, James Patrick’s study (observation lessons). Create a table and note down strengths and weaknesses – using key words but also encourage deeper thinking for aspects such as time, cost bias, etc. Plenary: I am 15 … Write a paragraph about who you are now. Describe changes in your circumstances since you were seven. Share if volunteers would like to. Reflect on its usability as a source for sociologists.
    • 13 Comparative studies and triangulation C - Describe what comparative studies and triangulation are. B - Explain why comparative studies and triangulation are useful for sociologists. A – Suggest examples where comparative studies and triangulation could be used C – Learners can describe comparative studies and triangulation B – Learners can explain why comparative studies and triangulation are useful for sociologists. A – Learners can suggest examples where comparative studies and triangulation could be used Starter: What case studies have we looked at? Which did you find the most interesting? What problems were identified with case studies? What could be done to support the research and eliminate these problems? Feedback from class. Introduce terms comparative studies and triangulation – draw out key elements of word to see if students can guess what they might mean. Use p45 of Active Sociology and write definitions of comparative studies and triangulation and why they are useful for sociologists. Pupils to identify different forms/paths of research that might help them to explore their own research topic further and explain – students to give their ideas to class and class to peer assess – do they agree this method would support? If not can they say why/suggest an alternative? Plenary: Five minutes to recap all key terms learnt throughout unit – play bingo or splat. Revise all work from unit 14-15 Reflect on unit C – Contribute to radio-style show identifying methods B - Outline main findings of own research, A - Offer ‘expert’ guidance identifying ways the research could have been improved. C – Learners can contribute to radio- style show identifying methods B – Learners can outline main findings of own research, A – Learners can offer ‘expert’ guidance identifying ways the research could have been improved. Starter: Play a bit of a radio 5 documentary and phone in show. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i76s1dkDUnQ – London riots – long but listen to snippets - What do you notice? Elicit ‘expert’ – public opinion, etc. Revision activity: Make a radio show based upon what you have learned in this unit. This could take the form of a radio phone in – with different people reacting to the headline statements (e.g shocking story of unethical study), or of a documentary, outlining what was found out, with a clear conclusion at the end. • Needed: DJ, Guests, Experts, Participants in the research, listeners to call in if necessary, key summary of findings from your own research. Students to ensure show is research centred – whatever ‘take’ they have, it must allow discussion of methods/ethics/strengths/weaknesses/examples from sociological research. Plenary: Listen to different groups’ shows and peer assess – what was good about what they included? Detail? Anything to improve? Revise work form unit for assessment 16 Assessment C - Learners can identify important Using sample assessment materials, (2010 paper) students to complete sample exam questions from methods section/s of exams.
    • C - Identify features of sociology short answer questions B – Include content and style in a short answer questions A – Evaluate performance against criteria features of short answer questions B - Learners can answer short answer questions using content and style A - Learners can self-assess and set themselves targets for the future Remind students of the ‘thematic’ nature of the exam – before answering students to pull out the ‘method’ part of the question – lets take it out of the context first, create answers from the work we’ve applied it to, then answer it in relation to the nature in which it is being asked – this may help students not get flustered if a methods question is about boys’ lessons in school, for example, when they’re not studying the education option. Using mark scheme mark as a class – students to set targets for areas to work on.