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  • 1. Exemplar Scheme of Learning (May 2012) The new SoL will be in a booklet form that every member of staff will have. Copies will also be available on the U drive. Booklets will consist of: 1. Contents Page 2. Relevant assessment levels 3. Success Criteria (golden ticket) 4. DIRT / T&L strategies (provided by DGW/RND) 5. Curriculum Map linked to skills not content 6. BLP – 4 R’s Reflective, resourcefulness, resilience, reciprocity (provided by Lynne Harris) 7. Each topic / SoL front sheet for assessment focus including AFL ladders New Scheme template Subject: Psychology – Unit2: Aggression Year: 11 Allocated time/No. of lessons: Approx 25 lessons/ 8-9 weeks Lesson No. Differentiated Learning Objectives Success Criteria Differentiated activities which promote active independent learning AFL strategies / feedback & dialogue Links to RWCM Homework 1 What causes aggression? C – Define aggression and give an opinion on a cause B – Describe the brain’s role in aggression A – Explain the brain’s role in C – Learners can define aggression B – Learners can identify the features of the brain involved in aggression A – Learners can explain using case studies the brain’s role in aggression Starter: Students complete “aggression opinion poll” questionnaire. Feedback as a class their opinions and reasons for this, encourage differences in opinions ensuring they justify their reasons. Explain many of the questions link to what we will be learning about in this unit. Pose scenario of Charles Whitman “man shot university students then killed himself” – what questions would students ask to find out more about why he did this? Gauge initial ideas as to what caused his aggression. Students read full case study of Charles Whitman, and discuss the following questions: Are you surprised? Any questions about his case? What seems to be the cause of his aggressive behaviour? Teacher explains additional case of Phineas Gage and shows image of brain structure. Students use pages 95-96 of textbook to find more detail of the brain structure involved in both these cases, and complete relevant
  • 2. aggression using terminology and examples sections on “Biological explanation of aggression” sheet –encourage higher ability to include references to other cases including cats and King (1961) as support for the brain’s role. Plenary: Students look back at their responses to questionnaire from starter – have any opinions changed now? Why/why not? 2 Do hormones cause aggression? C – Describe the role of hormones and testosterone B – Explain how testosterone is said to link to aggressive behaviour A – Apply knowledge of brain structure and hormones to a case study of aggression C – Learners can explain the role of testosterone and hormones B – Learners can explain the evidence for testosterone in aggression A – Learners can use biological evidence to suggest the cause of aggression in a case study Starter: Pose question “who is more aggressive, males or females?” – feedback as a class, encouraging students to give reasons for answer. Encourage higher ability students to consider differences according to types of aggression. Ask students if they can explain what a hormone is from any prior science learning? Explain their function, elicit from students male/female hormone names and explain the particular role of testosterone. Display research into testosterone and aggression on castrating mice – ask students to consider whether this is sufficient evidence? Does this mean we can apply it to humans? Encourage students to consider differences in animals/humans. Ask students how psychologists might have researched this link with humans ethically? Discuss research of hormones and humans – what does this suggest? Show students news report of the Cumbria shootings then give them detailed accounts of his personality, ask students what kind of person is he reported as being? Does this strike us as strange that he did this? Give students role of science correspondent: In small groups they should plan and prepare a new report as the science correspondent – talking about the possibility Bird’s killing spree was triggered by something biological. Encourage higher ability students to include suggestions for how forensics could investigate a biological link with Bird’s case. Plenary: Go through “where are we at” on PowerPoint – encourage students t reflect on what they have include in their report and next steps. 3-4 Carry out news correspondent activity Students should complete their news reporter scripts and record their news pieces. Once filmed, students should add onto their “Biological explanation of aggression” sheet by completing the sections on hormones. Display “evaluation questions” to encourage students to consider the strengths and weaknesses of the biological explanation of aggression. Once all groups have finished filming - discuss responses to these questions as a class and use this to complete strengths and weaknesses section of their sheets. 5-6 Social Learning Theory Starter: Murder mystery exercise – students to use information on cards to guess who the killer was, how they killed the victim and why they killed her. Feedback groups’ ideas and use to illustrate concept of social and environmental influence
  • 3. C – Describe the SLT of aggression B – Explain SLT using key terminology A – Assess the strengths and weaknesses of SLT of aggression Students make a list of TV programmes and video games they watch/play regularly then put a star next t the ones they would consider violent. Discuss reasons they watch/play then and whether or not they think their behaviour changes as a result of watching/playing them. Introduce SLT by watching clip of Bandura’s Bobo Doll experiment on youtube. Students to then use information on page 98 (covering up page 99!) to match up correctly the key terms of SLT with their definitions. Students answer the following: Q1: Summarise what Bandura found in his Bobo doll experiment. Q2: Do children copy TV and video games? Explain your answer using ideas from SLT. Show image of Thompson and Venables and pose the question “What made these two 10year old boys into murderers?” Give overview of the case and give students “The murder of James Bulger” sheet. Students to try and explain Thomson and Venables’ actions using SLT and key terms including modelling, observational learning etc. Students could also consider the Batman cinema shootings and use this instead of/in addition. Extension: Is this theory sufficient explanation? Is there anything it might not account for? Is it ‘too easy’ to blame TV and video games? Plenary: Students complete exit cards (something they have learnt today and questions they have/what they’d like to know more/do more on in this topic) and hand in to teacher on their way out. 7-8 Content analysis C – Describe the features and process of content analysis B – Explain how to carry out a content analysis A – Assess the issues with doing a content analysis and how to resolve them Starter: Display images of media forms and pose question “what do you thin content analysis means?” – elicit from students ideas. Explain we will learn the process and carry one out on our topic of aggression. Give students Content Analysis Transformers sheet – tell students we’ll watch film trailer for Transformers 2 and they should write in observation 1 notes every time they see something aggressive. Play trailer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH3STHC63hU and students make notes. Discuss afterwards – let them compare with a partner, did they get the same? Were there any problems? What could’ve made it better? Students should elicit the idea of listing types – explain categories. behaviour and tallying. Generate a list of suitable categories to tally, as a class, then watch the trailer again and tally up. Compare with partner again – was this easier? Did we get similar tallies? Students to plan their own content analysis on aggression – this can be TV, films, video games, music videos, trailers. Students should come up with their sample, categories and make sure 2 or more people are in the group for this because of reliability (words in bold should be discussed and considered by students) Plenary: Play Splat - display key terms tally, reliability, sample, representative, on board – 2 students up at a time and teacher asks a question. Whoever splats the Carry out content analysis and bring tally sheet results to next lesson (or next week – depending on timetable, allow at least 4 days to carry out!)
  • 4. orrect word first wins the round, continue until all words are used. N.B. Lesson 8 write up dependent on times/days of lesson – may be after ethics/Ramirez/Marketplace lessons Write up – Starter: Display Aim/Hypothesis/Method/Results/Conclusion/Evaluation and students to say a description of what goes in each section Demonstrate sentence starts for less able, and students to begin write up from Aim to Method. Recap calculation of mean – students share results as a group finding the means, then deciding the most interesting results and showing them in a bar chart. Recap terms such as reliability, representative, sample – ask how these might be used in an evaluation? Students complete write-up. Extension: Can we link our findings to any of the research/studies/theories we’ve looked at? Do our results support any and if so, how? 9 Culture and aggression LO: C – Describe Ramirez’s study into culture and aggression B – Explain the findings of Ramirez’s study and link to the nature/nurture debate A – Assess the strengths and weakness of Ramirez’s study Starter: Images displayed on board with key Qs: What is Culture? What is British culture? What is typically British about Brits? Feedback from students and explain LO Display images one at a time of Japanese and Spanish students asking what country are these people from? How did they know? Draw out from the idea of stereotyping – ask students if they have any prior ideas/knowledge about aggression from these 2 cultures? Explain how Ramirez carried out study – students then carry out original questionnaire he used and discus findings. Write don Ramirez et al’s findings and answer following Qs: * What do the findings of Ramirez et al.’s study tell us about gender differences and aggression?* What do the results of this study tell us about cultural differences and aggression Extension – how could this fit into the BIOLOGICAL or SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY’s explanations for aggression? Brainstorm strengths and weaknesses – pick 3 from GRAVE – feedback as a whole class and students make note of all strengths /weaknesses Plenary: Sum up today’s learning in less than 20 words 10 Ethics LO: Starter: Complete the What kind of psychologist will I be? questionnaire! Recap ethical issues students already know from Unit 1 – to elicit Informed Consent
  • 5. C: To describe the ethics involved when using humans in research. B: To consider how ethical issues are solved. A: To apply ethical issues to sample research and Right to Withdraw Complete Ethics sheet and mind-map – applying knowledge of what each ethical issues means for psychologist conducting research Once compete – go through scenarios of sample research on PowerPoint – for each – students to make a note of any ethical considerations they see in it and whether they would judge it overall to be ethical/unethical Discuss once gone through all scenarios - display answers and encourage feedback from students ensuring they justify opinions given Plenary: Discuss with a partner: Rate each ethical issue in order of importance. Which is the most important? Why? Feedback and peer questioning 11 Marketplace C: Describe 4 studies into aggression B: Compare and contrast studies’ findings A: Give strengths and weaknesses of one focal study ICT facilities useful Starter: Brainstorm as many key words, key terms you can remember from what we have done so far on the topic of “Do TV and video games affect young people’s behaviour?” Explain LO and that they will learn about 3 new studies using a marketplace activity – give overview that they will go onto writing an article for Psychology Times so students know where they are headed. Explain procedure and give out books, notes sheets and marketplace instructions. Students work through the stages; stage 1: reading info and putting into a poster (this can be differentiated in terms of word limit etc dependent on ability of students in group), stage 2: stallholder stays to “teach” visitors, rest f group visit other “stalls” and take notes – encourage independent learning and questioning by use of merits as reward for students inquiring – enforce no copying rule! Stage 3: Return to original group and share knowledge with stallholder so all have notes of all key studies. Stage 4: Choose a study (not the one they had for stage 1) and consider strengths and weaknesses of study using GRAVE. Extension: Start planning for a Psychology Times article by creating a fitting headline. Plenary: Feedback on chosen study for article – why have students chosen this one? What is the most interesting thing they have learnt about it? Did the findings surprise them? 12-13 Psychology Times article Starter: Psych Times: Give students WAGELL – what are good features of this? Could it be improved? How? Feedback from class Generate from class what the features of a good Psychology article might be –
  • 6. C: Describe in detail one key study on aggression B: Compare and contrast studies’ findings A: Evaluate key study in terms of its strengths, weaknesses and usefulness especially as it is aimed at ‘novice psychologists’ - eliciting e.g. catchy relevant headline, clear structure, concise, key terms used and explained? Display students’ ideas and students to begin writing up article. Peer assess halfway through – students to make adjustments to their work. Higher ability students should be encouraged to compare findings with others and link to nature nurture debate i.e. did one of the other 4 find similar? Does it support nature or nurture and how? Also in evaluation higher ability should consider usefulness/real life application of studies as well as general strengths and weaknesses of method choice, bias, etc. Extension: If finished early – students can add an “Ethics Watch” to their article and draw upon their previous lesson on ethical issues to consider if they think their study was ethical or not; encourage them to justify and explain their opinions 14-15 Study revision cards/top trumps C: Understand a summary (APFC) of each piece of research B: Explain a strength and weakness of each piece of research A: Make specific judgements about each piece of research using key psychological terms Starter: DIRT on articles – students to sign and comment on how they will address target/s identified. For now – display articles on wall – spread out on tables as class will use as a resource Explain that on one side students need to condense study to APFC (elicit form students to remind class of what this is) Show Top Trumps template on the board – elicit from students what each term means (validity/ethics etc) and how they are graded Students to use class’ articles and create their set of 4 Top Trumps. Can they address any of their targets in their Top Trumps? Extension: Can students justify why they have given specific ratings? Plenary: Play Top Trumps – and compare – did they all give similar ratings? Why/ Why not? Did anyone meet targets from DIRT in Top Trumps? How? 16 Censorship and the watershed C: Describe what is meant by censorship and different types of it B: Explain the role of the watershed as a form of Starter: Find the words in the wordsearch – cross them out in the grid as you find them. Write the letters you are left with in the gaps underneath – this will spell out today’s learning objectives! Pose questions: What do you think of when you hear the word “censorship?” What kind of censorship do you think we’re looking at given our topic? Explain the activity “Quick off the draw” – that in teams they will get questions one at a time and use the resource to find answers: Using pages 122-123 in text book, one person is a “runner” – as a team write the answer down, bring to teacher to check before getting the next question! Students must ensure that they all have a copy of
  • 7. censorship A: Explain arguments for and against censorship the correct answer for their notes – by writing out Q and A underneath. Encourage competition – prize for the winning team? Extension Qs if any teams finish: What type of government do you think we have? How do you know this? Which of the 2 theories we’ve learnt about would most support censorship by having a 9pm watershed? Feedback as a whole group to ensure understanding – quick fire questions to teams. For/against censorship: In teams, teacher gives half the teams “for” and half the tams” against: Using pages 124-125 they should prepare points for a debate for or against the 9 o’clock watershed - present argument to the class/carry out debate as class, group dependent. Plenary: Cloze sentences: The most interesting fact I have learnt today is… The best argument I have heard FOR the watershed is… The best argument I have heard AGAINST the watershed is… 17-18 Recap key ideas and aggression essay C: To consolidate understanding of theories of aggression B: To recall research evidence supporting different theories A: To evaluate evidence and apply it to the Chris Brown/Rihanna case Starter: Images of Chris Brown and Rihanna on board – pose questions: Who are these people? How are they linked? What has this got to do with our current topic? Explain LO and their role as a psychologist to decide if it was nature or nurture causing his violence Display key terms from unit – as a recap to nature/nurture - place the key words into 2 categories for 2 theories – display answers – did we get them right? Discuss any students got in wrong place and elicit from students why terms are nature/nurture. Main activity: “Biology to blame for beatings?” Respond to this question to assess the underlying cause of Chris’ behaviour! Students should try to use many of the key words from task 1. Writing frame available for lower ability students. Display success criteria (grades) on board and encourage to aim for target or aspirational grade – potential incentive for merits those who aim/achieve aspirational Extension: If finished – self assess using criteria and try to improve to get to the next grade. If at aspirational grade once this is complete – can they do a counter-argument toe the ‘side’ they mostly argued for in this essay? Plenary: Class vote – Chris Brown – nature or nurture? Why? Encourage differences in opinion ensuring students justify their opinions with psychological terms and/or knowledge. Complete essay if not done in class
  • 8. 19-20 Careers in psychology – Educational Psychologist C – Identify the features of an Educational psychologist’s job role B – Describe in detail the role and work of an Educational psychologist A - Explain the skills needed to become an Educational psychologist Starter: Title on board: What the role of an educational psychologist is – with images. Pose question what do they think an educational psychologist might do? Main task: Role of Ed Psych: Quick off the draw: Using pages 116-117 in text book, one person is a “runner” – as a team write the answer down, bring to teacher to check before getting the next question! Students must ensure they all have a copy of the correct answer for their notes. Extension: Look at the interventions on pg 117 – which 3 do you think are most useful? Why did you choose these ones? Main task: Becoming an Ed Psych: Imagine you work for the Local Education Authority and you need to recruit a new Educational Psychologist. Create a job advertisement detailing what the job would involve, who they would be working with and what skills and qualifications are needed. Ensure students incorporate skills needed too and key terminology e.g. empathic listening Roleplay activity: In pairs, one person is a trainee Ed Psych the other is recruiting. Prepare and carry our an interview – in front of class – peer feedback – did they cover all skills? Qualifications? Applying to exam: Give Jonah scenario. Exam question: “Describe how an Educational Psychologist might help Jonah. 7marks.” Students attempt answer – then give mark scheme – self/ peer assess then make adjustments based on mark scheme. 20-21 Revision Recall key knowledge and understanding Students take part in revision activities such as: • Revision tasks booklet for unit • Unit checklist – self assess confidence and set targets for areas to focus revision on • Quiz • Random generator ppt questions • Post it notes. Each student writes anything from the course – concept, study, etc - on a note. This is then randomly passed to another student, who should explain it to the whole class. As prep, they can all take 5 minutes to look up their randomly chosen concept/study using textbooks/internet first. If they take any notes, these must fit on the post-it. Revise for assessment 22 Assessment Complete exam questions from specimen assessment materials
  • 9. Apply knowledge and understanding to exam section 23 Reflection and target setting Identify strengths and targets for improvement in topic DIRT – Papers back – complete analysis sheet based on each question and from this compete target setting sheet. Students to work together on this – comparing so peer support for why e.g. one got full marks on a questions and another didn’t – teacher to circulate and provide individual feedback – key areas to be addressed as whole class following analysis dependent on issues arising.
  • 10. Apply knowledge and understanding to exam section 23 Reflection and target setting Identify strengths and targets for improvement in topic DIRT – Papers back – complete analysis sheet based on each question and from this compete target setting sheet. Students to work together on this – comparing so peer support for why e.g. one got full marks on a questions and another didn’t – teacher to circulate and provide individual feedback – key areas to be addressed as whole class following analysis dependent on issues arising.

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