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2012-2013 ASRM PG/SIG Leadership Orientation
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  • For a short time the Society was actually called the American Society for the Study of Sterility (ASSS). This name was quickly changed when the members assessed the abbreviation for the Society.You can read more about the history of the Society in a book entitled From the Beginning. A History of the American Fertility Society 1944-1994 by WE Duka and AH DeCherney published in 1994.The first article in the first issue of Fertility and Sterility was the article on endometrial dating by Noyes, Hertig, and Rock.
  • Because of the realization that the Society was more than a society devoted to fertility, the name was changed in 1994 to indicate that the members were interested in the breadth and scope of reproductive medicine. Our annual meetings now attract more than 4000 professional attendees and the total attendance is typically more than 7000. We are generally putting on over 20 postgraduate courses, attended by over 2200 individuals, the weekend before the meeting.
  • The ASRM building at 1209 Montgomery Highway in Vestavia Hills, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama, was purchased in 1991 for $1.2 million. It contains 14,600 square feet and has two stories. At the time of the purchase, the building was 10 years old. The building was completely renovated in 2007.The Development Fund received $668,000 in pledges for the purchase of the ASRM building.Outside the building is a large sculpture of steel and copper created expressly for the Society by sculptor Murray Dewart and named “Pulse of Morning” after the poem by Maya Angelou, which she wrote for Bill Clinton’s first inaugural. The intent of the sculpture is to “proclaim and inspire.”As described by the sculptor, the core circular ring represents its germinal center. The biological infolding of life is revealed in the simple outward pulse of the sprouting form expressed in the curved silhouette of the arches. The strong vertical columns link the creative process to the God of the Universe. The sculpture exhibits the essence of new life and represents the spirit and vision of the Society.
  • Surveys indicate that the two major reasons individuals join ASRM are for 1) interactions with colleagues and 2) education.
  • We interact with many other organizations.Abbreviations in the slide include: ACOG = American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; AUA = American Urological Association; LCOG = Liaison Committee for Obstetrics and Gynecology; IFFS = International Federation of Fertility Societies; AMA = American Medical Association; AAGL = American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscipists; AAMC = American Association of Medical Colleges; CFAS = Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society; ESHRE = European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology; NCOART = National Coalition of Oversite of Assisted Reproductive Technologies; MEFS = Middle East Fertility Society; FLASEF = Latin American Fertility Society; IMS = International Menopause Society; CMSS = Council of Medical Specialty Societies; SRS = Society of Reproductive Surgeons; SSR = Society for the Study of Reproduction
  • The Society is led by an 18-member Board of Directors. An Executive Committee, comprised of 9 members of the Board, meets more frequently than the Board.The day-to-day activities of the Society are led by the Executive Staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, who directly supervise the office staff.The purpose of the Board of Directors is to provide direction and establish policy for the Society – and not to manage the daily activities of the Society.The Executive Committee analyzes issues in depth and reports to the Board. When haste is required, the Executive Committee is empowered to act in place of the Board. Normally recommendations from the Executive Committee must be approved by the full Board.The Executive Staff is charged with carrying out the wishes of the Board. The staff does not establish policy.
  • The Society is led by an 18-member Board of Directors. An Executive Committee, comprised of 9 members of the Board, meets more frequently than the Board.The day-to-day activities of the Society are led by the Executive Staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, who directly supervise the office staff.The purpose of the Board of Directors is to provide direction and establish policy for the Society – and not to manage the daily activities of the Society.The Executive Committee analyzes issues in depth and reports to the Board. When haste is required, the Executive Committee is empowered to act in place of the Board. Normally recommendations from the Executive Committee must be approved by the full Board.The Executive Staff is charged with carrying out the wishes of the Board. The staff does not establish policy.
  • The Society is led by an 18-member Board of Directors. An Executive Committee, comprised of 9 members of the Board, meets more frequently than the Board.The day-to-day activities of the Society are led by the Executive Staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, who directly supervise the office staff.The purpose of the Board of Directors is to provide direction and establish policy for the Society – and not to manage the daily activities of the Society.The Executive Committee analyzes issues in depth and reports to the Board. When haste is required, the Executive Committee is empowered to act in place of the Board. Normally recommendations from the Executive Committee must be approved by the full Board.The Executive Staff is charged with carrying out the wishes of the Board. The staff does not establish policy.
  • The Society is led by an 18-member Board of Directors. An Executive Committee, comprised of 9 members of the Board, meets more frequently than the Board.The day-to-day activities of the Society are led by the Executive Staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, who directly supervise the office staff.The purpose of the Board of Directors is to provide direction and establish policy for the Society – and not to manage the daily activities of the Society.The Executive Committee analyzes issues in depth and reports to the Board. When haste is required, the Executive Committee is empowered to act in place of the Board. Normally recommendations from the Executive Committee must be approved by the full Board.The Executive Staff is charged with carrying out the wishes of the Board. The staff does not establish policy.
  • The Society is led by an 18-member Board of Directors. An Executive Committee, comprised of 9 members of the Board, meets more frequently than the Board.The day-to-day activities of the Society are led by the Executive Staff, under the direction of the Executive Director, who directly supervise the office staff.The purpose of the Board of Directors is to provide direction and establish policy for the Society – and not to manage the daily activities of the Society.The Executive Committee analyzes issues in depth and reports to the Board. When haste is required, the Executive Committee is empowered to act in place of the Board. Normally recommendations from the Executive Committee must be approved by the full Board.The Executive Staff is charged with carrying out the wishes of the Board. The staff does not establish policy.
  • Our size permits us to have more influence with the government (NIH, CDC, FDA) and with other organizations. Our diversity enables us to tackle a whole host of issues and provide meaningful input to the government. There is also the ability for cross-pollination of ideas and peoples.

2012-2013 ASRM PG/SIG Leadership Orientation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. PG/SIG Leadership Orientation 2012-2013
  • 2. Orientation Objectives: Gain a basic understanding of the history and importance of ASRM Learn roles and responsibilities of PGs/SIGs and ASRM Understand how PG and SIG activities are funded Understand the timeline and procedures for group elections Gain insight on recruiting and retaining members Forum for questions and comments
  • 3. ASRM: An Overview
  • 4. History of ASRM 1944: The American Society for the Study of Human Fertility holds first meeting 1947: First publication, Transactions of the American Society for the Study of Sterility 1950: Fertility and Sterility first published 1953: Society co-sponsors First World Congress on Fertility and Sterility
  • 5. History of ASRM 1965: Society changes name to “The American Fertility Society” 1983-85: Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (SREI), Society of Reproductive Surgeons (SRS), and Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) become affiliated societies within AFS 1991: Society purchases building in Birmingham, Alabama
  • 6. History of ASRM 1994: Society changes name to American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) at 50th Annual Meeting in San Antonio 2012: “Setting the Course in Reproductive Medicine”
  • 7. History of ASRM
  • 8. ASRM Mission Statement ASRM is a multidisciplinary organization dedicated to the advancement of the art, science and practice of reproductive medicine.
  • 9. Statement of Purpose Advancing reproductive medicine through education, [support of] research and advocacy
  • 10. Diversity of ASRM Membership ~ 8000 members from > 100 countries 23 Special Interest & Professional Groups
  • 11. Relationship to Other Societies/Agencies  ACOG  IFFS  ESHRE, CFAS, MEFS,  AMA ALMER, CSRM, ASPIRE,  AAGL AMMR, ISAR  AAMC  NICHD, NIH, CDC, FDA  NCOART  WHO  SGI  WES  CMSS  Council of Academic  SSR Societies  LCOG  AUA  SCOG  American College of Surgeons  APGO/CREOG
  • 12. Organizational HierarchyASRM Members Board Of Directors Executive Committee Executive Staff Office Staff Elect Board and Officers
  • 13. Organizational HierarchyASRM Members Board Of Directors Executive Committee Executive Staff Office Staff •Develop and Support the Mission Statement •Protect, Preserve and Grow the Assets of the Society •Develop and Carry Out the Strategic Plan
  • 14. Organizational HierarchyASRM Members Board Of Directors Executive Committee Executive Staff Office Staff •Serves as an advisory body to the President, Executive Director and Board •Can serve as the governing body when the Board is not is session •Examines societal issues in order to make recommendations to the Board
  • 15. Organizational HierarchyASRM Members Board Of Directors Executive Committee Executive Staff Office Staff •Carry out direction set forth by the Board of Directors Elect Board •Manage and Officers human resources and assets •Organize and conduct Annual Meeting •Oversee CME activities •Comply with Regulations •Respond to inquiries from press, public, organizations, etc.
  • 16. Organizational HierarchyASRM Members Board Of Directors Executive Committee Executive Staff Office Staff Coordinate ASRM activities
  • 17. ASRM Membership ASRM Members by Member Type Other <1% Allied Health Life Fellow and Professionals 17% Postdoctoral 23% 3% Residents and Students 3% Physicians and other Doctoral Members 54% As of September 30, 2012
  • 18. ASRM Membership Practice Percentage Administrator 3% Andrology 1% Embryology 7% Family Practice Less than 1% Gynecology 5% Gynecology/Infertility 10% ASRM Members Internal Medicine Less than 1% by Practice Infertility Only 5% Laboratory 2% As of September 30, 2012 Legal Professionals Less than 1% Mental Health 4% Nurses 5% Ob/Gyn 23% Other 7% Other Physician Less than 1% Research 3% REI 20% Urology 3%
  • 19. ASRM Membership ASRM Members ASRM Members by Gender by Residence 2% 31% 41% 57% 69% Female Male Did Not Report Domestic International As of September 30, 2012
  • 20. ASRM Membership ASRM Members by Generation30002500200015001000 500 0 Greatest Baby Boomers Generation X Millennial Generation Generation As of September 30, 2012
  • 21. ASRM Membership Top 10 Interests of ASRM Members 1 Infertility 74.79% 2 Assisted Reproductive Technologies 72.69% 3 Fertility Preservation 53.34% 4 Polycystic Ovary Syndrome 45.67% 5 Cryopreservation 37.95% 6 Endometriosis 36.09% 7 Gender Screening/Testing 29.24% 8 Insemination 28.37% 9 Gamete Donation 27.19% 10 Surgery 24.77% As of September 30, 2012
  • 22. ASRM Programs Education  SMRU Traveling Scholars  Contraception Day  Menopause Day  Surgery Day  Resident Reporter  ASRM/SREI Fellows Retreat  ASRM eLearn™  In-Training Travel Awards
  • 23. ASRM Programs Research ASRM Distinguished Researcher Award  Ira and Ester Rosenwaks New Investigator Award  The Suheil J. Muasher Distinguished Service Award  Research Grants
  • 24. ASRM Programs Advocacy J.B. Younger Office of Public Affairs Washington, D.C.
  • 25. ASRM Strategic Goals Advocacy Advocate for the highest standard of practice in the field of reproductive medicine. EducationBe the leader in educational offeringsin the field of reproductive medicine.
  • 26. ASRM Strategic Goals, cont. Membership Increase and retain members who areactive and engaged while supporting the diverse nature of ASRM. Organizational Stability Maintain excellent operational, financial and organizational oversight to ensure achievement of ASRM’s goals and objectives.
  • 27. ASRM Strategic Goals, cont. Research Support and influence research that provides value for members and represents the highest standard of excellence in the field.
  • 28. Overview of PGs and SIGs
  • 29. The Big PictureAdvantages of having Member Groups A larger society has more influence. (Example: Membership in CMSS) Diversity attracts more attention and commercial support for the Annual Meeting. There is the opportunity for members with like- interests to interact more closely. The structure helps develop leaders for the overall Society.
  • 30. ASRM PGs and SIGsProfessional Groups Association of Reproductive Managers (ARM) Legal (LPG) Mental Health (MHPG) Nurses (NPG)
  • 31. ASRM PGs and SIGsSpecial Interest Groups Androgen Excess (AESIG)  Menopause (MSIG) Chinese (ChSIG)  Nutrition (NutriSIG) Contraceptive (CSIG)  Pediatric and Adolescent Early Pregnancy (EPSIG) Gynecology (PAGSIG) Endometriosis (EndoSIG)  Preimplantation Genetic Environment and Reproduction Diagnosis (PGDSIG) (ERSIG)  Reproductive Immunology Fertility Preservation (FPSIG) (RISIG) Fibroids (FSIG)  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology (RMSCBSIG) Genetic Counseling (GCSIG)  Sexuality (SSIG) Health Disparities (HDSIG)  Women’s Council (WC) Imaging in Reproductive Medicine (IRMSIG)
  • 32. ASRM PGs and SIGsForming SIGs Complementary and Alternative Medicine Database Management Solutions Turkish Group Indian Group
  • 33. ASRM PG/SIG Roles and ResponsibilitiesWhat ASRM Does for Your Group: Our facilities serve as group headquarters. Coordinates business activities and provides administrative support for each PG/SIG Helps coordinate educational programs for the ASRM Annual Meeting Maintains D&O insurance Bills and collects any membership dues and other fees Assumes financial liability for PG courses
  • 34. ASRM PG/SIG Roles and ResponsibilitiesWhat is required of PGs/SIGs: Must operate in compliance with ASRM policies, procedures, guidelines, and group bylaws Must collect dues to help support the cost of providing services Must provide a report summarizing group activities and plans for each ASRM board meeting
  • 35. Key ASRM Staff Robert Rebar, M.D. Dan Carre, C.P.A. Executive Director Chief Financial Officer Vickie Gamble, M.P.P.M. Sean Tipton, M.A. Director of Operations Director of Public AffairsAndrew La Barbera, Ph.D. Scientific Director
  • 36. Key ASRM Staff Pam Nagel Director of Society Advancement Deb Hanson Director of Meetings and Events
  • 37. Key ASRM Staff Keith Ray, B.A. Manager of Grant Development and Coordination Education Coordinators Penelope Fenton, M.A. Postgraduate Program Coordinator Lee Boughton, M.A. Scientific Program Coordinator
  • 38. Key ASRM Staff Julie Beckham, B.A. Manager of Member Services Member Group Coordinators Christy Davis, B.A. Kelley Jefferson Susanna Scarbrough, B.A.
  • 39. Funding PG and SIG Activities
  • 40. Standard Services Provided to PGs/SIGsMeetings Coordinate, staff, and provide minutes for one conference call per quarter (PGs) or per year (SIGs) Arrange for members’ meetings (All) and make arrangements for any receptions to be held at the ASRM Annual Meeting (PGs)
  • 41. Standard Services Provided to PGs/SIGsCommunications Edit/lay out content that has been provided for a four-page electronic newsletter twice a year (PGs) or once a year (SIGs) Webpage content update and maintenance once a month One electronic survey to group members per year Handle group-related telephone/email inquiries Manage group listserv
  • 42. Standard Services Provided to PGs/SIGsAdministration/Clerical Balloting once a year Award for outgoing chair (PGs) or certificate for outgoing chair (SIGs) Provide financial statements quarterly (PGs)
  • 43. Standard Services Provided to PGs/SIGsEducation Coordinate educational activities for the ASRM Annual Meeting (PG courses, symposia, etc.) Coordinate prize paper and other awards
  • 44. Standard Services Provided to PGs/SIGsMembership Provide list of terminated and new members quarterly (PGs) or annually (SIGs) Manage membership data
  • 45. Policy for Funding Additional Services An Additional Support Request Form must be submitted Request will be reviewed by ASRM management Approval is contingent upon the group’s available funds after the cost of providing standard services has been deducted. Exceptions for activities supported by designated funds Once the request is approved, an estimate for services will be generated – must be signed by ASRM management and group representative
  • 46. Policy for Funding Additional Services
  • 47. Policy for Funding Additional Services
  • 48. Obtaining Industry Support Understanding the landscape Early identification of needs (9-12 months) Key contacts – building relationships Multiple funding sources Initiate the request Follow up…follow up…follow up Recognition and thank you Anticipate future needs/cultivate fund development mindset
  • 49. Holding PG and SIG Elections
  • 50. Tips for a Smooth Election Plan ahead – Don’t wait until the last minute! Check your bylaws Collect biosketches with nominations
  • 51. General Election Timeline120 days prior to Annual Meeting Call for nominations followed up in two weeks with a reminder90 days prior to the Annual Meeting Review candidates Determine who will be on ballot Send biosketches to ASRM staff coordinator
  • 52. General Election Timeline60 days prior to the Annual Meeting Call to vote followed up in two weeks with a reminder Voting typically open for 30 days30 days prior to the Annual Meeting Winner notified Winner should make plans to attend your Members’ Meeting
  • 53. Recruiting and Retaining Members
  • 54. The Value PropositionWhat are the benefits of being a member ofyour group? Tangible vs. Intangible Benefits Communicating Benefits  Features vs. Value Creating New Benefits  Based on needs and interests
  • 55. Recruitment StrategiesDisciplines of Recruiting The target market The marketing message The promotional tactics
  • 56. Retention Strategies3 tips for Retaining Members Deliver value Court new members Contact lapsed members
  • 57. Questions?
  • 58. Final Thoughts Thank you for your service to ASRM and your group! Contact us if you have any questions – feel free to email or call your group coordinator, Membership Manager, or the Executive Director. Feel free to suggest improvements in services we provide to SIGs and PGs.