Mobile Learning & Digital Literacy
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Mobile Learning & Digital Literacy

on

  • 2,657 views

Slideshow of a presentation given in the summer of 2011 at the PALE summer camp.

Slideshow of a presentation given in the summer of 2011 at the PALE summer camp.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,657
Views on SlideShare
2,618
Embed Views
39

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
36
Comments
0

2 Embeds 39

http://mooc.fr 32
http://itypa2.mooc.fr 7

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • \n
  • In the 90s, the faculty of law at Harvard, keen on maintaining its standings, modernized all its classrooms to meet the students' demands to access the internet from their laptops. New chairs, electrical and Internet outlets were installed for all. Classes had barely started when Internet access was cut off. The students were always online. Some teachers felt useless, others found it difficult to cope with the barrage of questions and refutations fueled by Internet access. Today, the Internet connections have still not been reactivated; however, the whole campus is covered with wi-fi. And professors cintinue to ponder how to cope with this new technology. This story reflects the maelstrom to which we're trying to adapt in this acceleration of evolution.\n
  • • Piet Mondrian (Dutch)\n• Representation of a rational world.\n• The way to transmit information: structured, organized, linear. Consequence of assimilated and conventional knowledge.\n
  • • Interpreting information: muddled, uncertainty, disorganized, reticular. Consequences of neural unfamiliarity.\n• The neural divide between teachers and learners.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • Facteurs de l’évolution de la définition\n- évolution de la technologie\n- diversification des appareils\n- école ou apprentissage social / (e-learning)\n- centré sur l’enseignant ou sur l’apprenant\n- formel ou informel\n- connectivité\n\n- http://www.iadis.net/dl/final_uploads/200506C018.pdf\n- http://www.m-learning.org/knowledge-centre/whatismlearning\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n- http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/346/875\n- http://www.lsri.nottingham.ac.uk/msh/Reports/Big%20Issues%20in%20mobile%20learning%20report.pdf#page=5\n- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile-learning\n
  • • 1st revolution: computer engineering\n• Moore’s law: computing power doubles every two years\n• 2 x more powerful / 3 x cheaper / same screen resolution\n• The microchip in the iPhone is more powerful than the computer that NASA used in 1969.\n
  • • 1st revolution: computer engineering\n• Moore’s law: computing power doubles every two years\n• 2 x more powerful / 3 x cheaper / same screen resolution\n• The microchip in the iPhone is more powerful than the computer that NASA used in 1969.\n
  • • 1st revolution: computer engineering\n• Moore’s law: computing power doubles every two years\n• 2 x more powerful / 3 x cheaper / same screen resolution\n• The microchip in the iPhone is more powerful than the computer that NASA used in 1969.\n
  • • 1st revolution: computer engineering\n• Moore’s law: computing power doubles every two years\n• 2 x more powerful / 3 x cheaper / same screen resolution\n• The microchip in the iPhone is more powerful than the computer that NASA used in 1969.\n
  • • La révolution des écrans tactiles\n
  • • Ray Kurzweill: Law of Accelerating Returns\n• 2010 / 2025 / 2060\n• 2030: first brain implants.\n
  • • Ray Kurzweill: Law of Accelerating Returns\n• 2010 / 2025 / 2060\n• 2030: first brain implants.\n
  • • Ray Kurzweill: Law of Accelerating Returns\n• 2010 / 2025 / 2060\n• 2030: first brain implants.\n
  • • 2nd revolution: data & information\n• 2006: 100 times as much information as in the Library of Congress.\n• 2008 : More information than in all the history of humanity prior\n• The vast array of functions to suit our needs.\n
  • • 2nd revolution: data & information\n• 2006: 100 times as much information as in the Library of Congress.\n• 2008 : More information than in all the history of humanity prior\n• The vast array of functions to suit our needs.\n
  • • 2nd revolution: data & information\n• 2006: 100 times as much information as in the Library of Congress.\n• 2008 : More information than in all the history of humanity prior\n• The vast array of functions to suit our needs.\n
  • • The Internet doesn’t only allow the distribution of information to millions of people, it allows millions of people to distribute information. (Douglas Rushkoff)\n• From media consumers, to media producers.\n
  • • The Internet doesn’t only allow the distribution of information to millions of people, it allows millions of people to distribute information. (Douglas Rushkoff)\n• From media consumers, to media producers.\n
  • • A new context requires new skills/competencies.\n
  • • 3rd revolution : the binary code\n• A language for creativity and objects\n• Text 2.0\n
  • • 3rd revolution : the binary code\n• A language for creativity and objects\n• Text 2.0\n
  • • 3rd revolution : the binary code\n• A language for creativity and objects\n• Text 2.0\n
  • • 4th revolution : intellectual property\n• Open movement\n- open source\n- open-ed\n- open education resources\n- open university\n- open research\n• Creative Commons\n• (Commons-based peer production / Yochai Benkler)\n• free internet\n• copy and paste / mash-up\n
  • • 4th revolution : intellectual property\n• Open movement\n- open source\n- open-ed\n- open education resources\n- open university\n- open research\n• Creative Commons\n• (Commons-based peer production / Yochai Benkler)\n• free internet\n• copy and paste / mash-up\n
  • • Wikipedia (2000)\n- 28 500 000 articles\n- 250 languages\n• Britannica (1778)\n• Universalis (1968)\n• One page in Wikipedia is devoted to mistakes in Britannica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Errors_in_the_Encyclopædia_Britannica_that_have_been_corrected_in_Wikipedia\n• Étude: 60% des médecins disent recourir à Wikipédia comme source de référence (Grande-Bretagne) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13615420\n• Study: increase in Wikipedia references in scientific journals.\n• I’m always intrigued by teachers who question the validity of Wikipedia. Don’t they question their own knowledge? Do they believe that manuels are exempt of errors?\n
  • • Wikipedia (2000)\n- 28 500 000 articles\n- 250 languages\n• Britannica (1778)\n• Universalis (1968)\n• One page in Wikipedia is devoted to mistakes in Britannica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Errors_in_the_Encyclopædia_Britannica_that_have_been_corrected_in_Wikipedia\n• Étude: 60% des médecins disent recourir à Wikipédia comme source de référence (Grande-Bretagne) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13615420\n• Study: increase in Wikipedia references in scientific journals.\n• I’m always intrigued by teachers who question the validity of Wikipedia. Don’t they question their own knowledge? Do they believe that manuels are exempt of errors?\n
  • • Wikipedia (2000)\n- 28 500 000 articles\n- 250 languages\n• Britannica (1778)\n• Universalis (1968)\n• One page in Wikipedia is devoted to mistakes in Britannica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Errors_in_the_Encyclopædia_Britannica_that_have_been_corrected_in_Wikipedia\n• Étude: 60% des médecins disent recourir à Wikipédia comme source de référence (Grande-Bretagne) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13615420\n• Study: increase in Wikipedia references in scientific journals.\n• I’m always intrigued by teachers who question the validity of Wikipedia. Don’t they question their own knowledge? Do they believe that manuels are exempt of errors?\n
  • 5th revolution: networks\n• It’s called the World Wide Web, and it’s free (Tim Berners-Lee)\n• Twittosphere http://well-formed-data.net/archives/642/the-vizosphere\n
  • 5th revolution: networks\n• It’s called the World Wide Web, and it’s free (Tim Berners-Lee)\n• Twittosphere http://well-formed-data.net/archives/642/the-vizosphere\n
  • \n
  • • How to go from ‘inactive’ to ‘creator’: Twitter\n• The student today is a poor spectator.\n\nhttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm\n
  • • How to go from ‘inactive’ to ‘creator’: Twitter\n• The student today is a poor spectator.\n\nhttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm\n
  • • How to go from ‘inactive’ to ‘creator’: Twitter\n• The student today is a poor spectator.\n\nhttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm\n
  • • How to go from ‘inactive’ to ‘creator’: Twitter\n• The student today is a poor spectator.\n\nhttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm\n
  • • How to go from ‘inactive’ to ‘creator’: Twitter\n• The student today is a poor spectator.\n\nhttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm\n
  • • Location-based integration. Mobile learning has taken to the streets, with technologies that allow for seamless integration with a wide range of locations. One of the best uses of this technology has been within museums, where visitors can use a mobile device to listen to information about items in the museum's collection.\n• Snack learning. Educators are developing learning tools that offer up snack sized bits of learning for students on the go.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • • Study: we read more often with mobile devices, at different times of the day http://readitlaterlist.com/blog/2011/01/is-mobile-affecting-when-we-read/\n
  • \n
  • • Outlook : little change before 2031\n
  • \n
  • • E-literacy is the awarenesses, skills, understandings and reflective-evaluative approaches that are necessary for an individual to operate comfortably in information rich and IT-supported environments. (Allan Martin, 2003, University of Glascow)\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • Translittératie : l’habileté à lire, écrire et interagir en utilisant une variété de plateformes, d’outils et de moyens de communications.\n• Multitasking\n• Si la littératie est « l'ensemble des connaissances en lecture et en écriture permettant à une personne d’être fonctionnelle en société » (Antidote) et que les jeunes développent leurs compétences en fonction de l'environnement dans lequel ils évoluent, ne peut-on pas affirmer que... (ce sont leurs professeurs qui sont incompétents en littératie)?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • A truism\n• Now that knowledge is so accessible, its value lies in its actualization.\n
  • • Search engines that are getting more and more intelligent (Google instant)\n• Boolean functions\n• algorithms\n• Google advanced search: by degree of difficulty.\n
  • • ... by each individual\n• life portfolio\n• folksonomies (tags)\n
  • • The importance of sight and sound in the evolution of the brain.\n
  • • Multiethnic\n• More often than not, we don’t know the origins of those on the other end.\n• Global village.\n
  • • Networked\n• Connected\n• Wired\n• Reticular\n
  • • wikis\n
  • • Social media\n• Social Learning\n• The notion of ‘Digital Native’ is not so much a matter of cognition as it is of relation.\n
  • • Connective\n• Connectivism\n• Collective intelligence\n• From a presumed authority to collective credibility.\n
  • • easily annotated\n
  • • Integrated reference tools\n• Web 3.0\n
  • • Can be replicated\n• Mashable\n• Paperli / Tweeted Times\n
  • • Flipboard\n• updated information\n• out of date manuels\n
  • • Serendipitous\n
  • • rather than linear\n• ecology of knowledge\n• An organic system is never linear, nor its framework rectangular.\n
  • \n
  • • Qualcomm\n• SDK (software development kit)\n• Contest\n
  • • Mabrito and Medley’ thesis (Innovate) (Mark Mabrito, Rebecca Medley)\n• The digital divide between students and teachers will only widen. (Jim Hendler)\n• Digital divide of the second degree\n
  • • Devices are adapting to reading...\n• ePub\n
  • • ... as reading formats are adapting to devices... as well as writing to the screen (texto)\n
  • • Paper text resulted in significantly faster reading speeds.\n• Short-term memory performance was significantly better for electronic-readers.\n• No long-term memory differences.\n• Electronic-readers exhibited no cognitive disadvantage on an academic learning task.\nhttp://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/video/cognitive-differences-in-reading-from-kindle-ipad-and-paper-text-2.html\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • Neurosciences: Bloc teaching is inefficient - short-term learning\n• In spite of appearances, teaching methods have evolved.\n• The computer empowers the learner; mobiles liberate him.\n• An analog school for digital students.\n• The Reformers Are Leaving Our Schools in the 20th Century (Mark Prensky)\n• The baby-duck syndrome (Konrad Lorenz)\n
  • • OECD: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development\n- Educating Teachers for Diversity: Meeting the Challenge\n- Homogeneity: Learners perceived to be similar and get same treatment.\n- Heterogenity: Adjustments to come to terms with learners’ differences.\n- Diversity: Differences as resource for mutual learning\n• Reversed instruction / flipped classroom\n
  • • Paradigm shift\n• From this… (teacher-centered)\n
  • • … to that!\n• … learner-centered\n
  • • The acceleration of evolution = life in perpetual beta\n
  • • The digital divide is also a school divide.\n• Technology does not replace the teacher, but brings a new complexity which teachers must grasp.\n
  • • Geoffrey Moore, 1999\n• Bohlen, Rogers et coll. 1957\n
  • • Traditionnalists: people who have a limited digital engagement and resist change.\n
  • • Traditionnalists: people who have a limited digital engagement and resist change.\n
  • • Traditionnalists: people who have a limited digital engagement and resist change.\n
  • • Traditionnalists: people who have a limited digital engagement and resist change.\n
  • • Perception of teacher skills in IT (35%)\n• CEFRIO, Générations C\n• Interpreting results: students who believe in school, students who are nerds.\n
  • • DIKW (Russell Ackoff, 1989)\nData\nInformation\nKnowledge\nWisdom\n• « If teaching consists only in passing along knowledge, schools are now dwarfed by the Internet. »\n
  • • The economy of attention\n• Economy in the sense of time well spent.\n• What strategies has teaching borrowed from media (video games)?\n• The difficult for the brain to concentrate for too long on the same subject.\n• Attention deficit? really? They spend hours on end playing video games.\n
  • \n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • • Metacognition\n\n- http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf\n
  • \n
  • • School relies too much on extrinsic motivation, such as grades.\n
  • • Canadian Education Association (CEA) : Percentage of 67,248 grade 5 to 12 students engaged in their learning and school\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • • Augmented knowledge.\n• Importance of real-time in knowledge: learning in context (difficulty of transferring knowledge: different context)\n• Connectivism (that we’ll be coming back to) : connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n
  • • Complementarity of methods\n• Jean Piaget\n• John Dewey\n• Palo Alto school (Gregory Bateson)\n• Lev Vygotski’s socio-constructivism\n
  • • Robert Gagné\n• Jacques Tardif\n\n
  • • Jean Piaget\n• Flipped instruction / inverted learning\n• 14 psychological learner-centered principles (American Psychological Association)\n- cognitive and metacognitive factors (6)\n- motivational and affective factors (3)\n- developmental and social factors (2)\n- individual differences factors (3)\n- http://www.apa.org/ed/governance/bea/learner-centered.pdf\n
  • • Jean Piaget\n• Flipped instruction / inverted learning\n• 14 psychological learner-centered principles (American Psychological Association)\n- cognitive and metacognitive factors (6)\n- motivational and affective factors (3)\n- developmental and social factors (2)\n- individual differences factors (3)\n- http://www.apa.org/ed/governance/bea/learner-centered.pdf\n
  • • Jean Piaget\n• Flipped instruction / inverted learning\n• 14 psychological learner-centered principles (American Psychological Association)\n- cognitive and metacognitive factors (6)\n- motivational and affective factors (3)\n- developmental and social factors (2)\n- individual differences factors (3)\n- http://www.apa.org/ed/governance/bea/learner-centered.pdf\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • George Siemens\n• Stephen Downes\n• Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks.\n• Interaction: blogs, interactive Web (Web 2.0)\n• The externalization of thought. (Michel Serres) http://interstices.info/display.jsp?id=c_15918\n• Study: The collective intelligence (connective intelligence) of groups exceeds the cognitive abilities of individuals within the groups (Williams Wooley, Anita, Malone, Thomas W., 2010)\n
  • • The verb/action vs. the object\n• The problem of economic disparities\n- many students already own these devices / existant disparity\n
  • • I Google my words to check spelling rather than use a dictionary.\n• Anecdote school planners at the P.E.I.\n• Affordances: possibilities for action (James Gibson)\n• Digital devices offer not only creative, but personal affordances.\n• Youths are more agile with affordances, for they are not hampered by old habits.\n• The case of people who ask me what they can do differently with an iPad.\n\n
  • • The most dangerous strategy is to jump a chasm in two leaps. (Benjamin Disraeli)\n• The 24/7 web infantilizes the 9 to 5 school.\n
  • • Students are afraid to bring their laptops\n• iPod Touchs\n- not knowing what students are doing\n
  • \n

Mobile Learning & Digital Literacy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. mobile learning &digital literacyFrançois Guité
  • 2. 1. mobile learning
  • 3. 2. digital literacy
  • 4. 3. pedagogical considerations
  • 5. 1. mobile learning
  • 6. mLearning is the acquisition of anyknowledge and skill through usingmobile technology, anywhere, anytime,that results in an alteration inbehaviour.Definition of mobile learning (S.J. Geddes, 2004)
  • 7. 2000 2010 1st revolution: computer engineeringReflectionOf.Me : http://reflectionof.me/2000-vs-2010
  • 8. 2000 2010
  • 9. $US 1,000 of computing buys: Adapted from R. Kurzweill (2001) : http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-law-of-accelerating-returns
  • 10. The conversationprism 2nd revolution: data production Brian Solis: The Conversation Prism v.3 (2010) http://www.theconversationprism.com/
  • 11. The conversationprism Brian Solis: The Conversation Prism v.3 (2010) http://www.theconversationprism.com/
  • 12. The conversationprism The Internet doesn’t only allow the distribution of information to millions of people, it allows millions of people to ditribute information. (Douglas Rushkoff) Brian Solis: The Conversation Prism v.3 (2010) http://www.theconversationprism.com/
  • 13. http://www.go-gulf.com/blog/60-seconds
  • 14. Text 2.0 3rd revolution: the binary code http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QocWsWd7fc
  • 15. Copyleft 4th revolution: intellectual property
  • 16. Size ofWikipedia Britannica zUniversalis Wikimedia (2010 )http://blog.wikimedia.fr/apprehender-la-veritable-taille-de-wikipedia-1249
  • 17. 5th revolution: networks
  • 18. Creators : publish Web pages, write blogs, upload videos to sites like YouTube Inactives are online, but donʼt yet participate in any form of social mediahttp://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_24/b4038405.htm
  • 19. Major mobile-learning trends■ location-based ■ online collaborative learning integration ■ the rise of the tablet■ online class management ■ social media for education■ domination of e-books ■ snack learning■ cloud computing ■ m-learning in workplace■ bring your own device training(Online College, 2011) http://www.onlinecollege.org/2011/07/05/10-major-mobile-learning-trends-to-watch-for/
  • 20. 2. digital literacy
  • 21. Subway ad
  • 22. Subway ad
  • 23. Subway ad
  • 24. QR codes
  • 25. The evolution of reading Bohn, R.E. et Short, J.E (2009) http://hmi.ucsd.edu/pdf/HMI_2009_ConsumerReport_Dec9_2009.pdf
  • 26. The ability to identify, understand,interpret, create, communicate, computeand use printed and written materialsassociated with varying contexts.Definition of literacy (UNESCO)
  • 27. Canadian adults with alow level of literacyCanadian Council on Learning(2008) low http://www.ccl-cca.ca/ccl/Reports/ReadingFuture/Snapshot-2.html
  • 28. Average reading time Statistics Canada (2005), Bureau of Labor Statistics (2009), Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006), Eurostat (2007) http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/books/national-book-count-aims-to-show-that-books-count/article1866480/
  • 29. The awarenesses, skills, understandings,and reflective-evaluative approaches thatare necessary for an individual to operatecomfortably in information rich and IT-supported environments.Definition of e-literacy (Martin, A. & Ashworth, S.; 2004) http://www.ics.heacademy.ac.uk/italics/vol5iss4/martin.pdf
  • 30. Definitions of digital literacy aregenerally built on three principles:■ the skills and knowledge to access and use a variety of digital media software applications and devices■ the ability to critically understand digital media content and applications■ the knowledge and capacity to create with digital technology. Media Awareness Network (2010) http://www.media-awareness.ca/francais/organisation/galerie_de_presse/memoire_litteratie_numerique_pdf/memoirelitteratienumerique.pdf
  • 31. TransliteracyTransliteracy is the ability to read, write and interactacross a range of platforms, tools and media. Sue Thomas, Université de Montford
  • 32. Knowledge is more…
  • 33. readily available
  • 34. searchable
  • 35. archived / organizable
  • 36. multimedia
  • 37. multicultural
  • 38. hyperlinked
  • 39. collaborative
  • 40. social
  • 41. collective
  • 42. interactive
  • 43. integrated
  • 44. synthesized
  • 45. real time
  • 46. fortuitous
  • 47. organic
  • 48. augmented
  • 49. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDN_ZN0XEow
  • 50. What if teachers were the ones whodidn’t know how to read? Mabrito M. & Medley R. (2008) http://www.innovateonline.info/pdf/vol4_issue6/Why_Professor_Johnny_Cant_Read-__Understanding_the_Net_Generations_Texts.pdf
  • 51. e-readers
  • 52. Reading formats and devices
  • 53. Reading differences
  • 54. 3. pedagogical considerations
  • 55. Homogeneity Heterogeneity Diversity Learners grouped Learners are Learners are in one kind of perceived to be perceived to be educational different. different. Their institution are Adjustments are difference serves as perceived to be made to come to a resource for similar and terms with their individual and therefore get the needs. mutual learning same treatment. and development. Difference seen as a Difference seen as Difference not challenge to be an asset and acknowledged. dealt with. opportunity.OECD : from homogeneity to diversity OCDE (2010) Educating Teachers for Diversity: Meeting the Challenge http://www.oecd.org/document/38/0,3343,en_2649_35845581_44572006_1_1_1_1,00.html
  • 56. We are currently preparing students forjobs that don’t yet exist,using technologies that haven’t beeninvented,in order to solve problems we don’t evenknow are problems yet. (Scott McLeod, Karl Fisch) http://thefischbowl.blogspot.com/2006/08/did-you-know.html
  • 57. Remplacerwith: Replace par : • •pédagogie pedagogy • •didactique materials • •TIC ICT • •ouverture openness • •innovation innovation • •etc. etc. social change school evolutionThe digital divide
  • 58. Number of adoptersTechnology adoption lifecycle (Geoffrey Moore, 1999) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossing_the_Chasm
  • 59. Generational differences in adopting ICThttps://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Marketing/Digital_Marketing/Are_your_customers_becoming_digital_junkies_2839 (McKinsey, 2011)
  • 60. Mes enseignants ont leshave the skills torequises pour My teachers compétencesm’accompagner dansme in my learning of IT des TI accompany mon apprentissage Yes, most of them Yes, some of them No (CEFRIO, 2009) http://www.cefrio.qc.ca/index.php?id=74&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=4820&tx_ttnews[backPid]=45&cHash=d5a0460346
  • 61. The DIKW model Ackoff, R. (1989)
  • 62. Attention
  • 63. The digital textbook http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX4i9K6upqU
  • 64. Advantages of m-learning■ access■ context■ collaboration■ motivation motivation■ literacy■ connectivity connectivity (Geddes, S.J., 2004) http://knowledgetree.flexiblelearning.net.au/edition06/download/Geddes.pdf
  • 65. School motivation (Viau, 1994)
  • 66. Determinants Student perception • of the value of the task • of his competence • of his controllability of the taskSchool motivation (Viau, 1994)
  • 67. Intellectual engagement % of grade 5 - 12 students engaged in their learning and school 100 75 82 76 67 50 57 48 45 42 41 25 0 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 (CEA, 2009) http://www.cea-ace.ca/sites/default/files/ace-2009-qatfaea-infographique.pdf
  • 68. analyse filter relate interpret etc. do try evaluate correct etc.Constructing knowledge http://www.francoisguite.com/2007/10/constructivisme-socioconstructivisme-et-connectivisme/
  • 69. exchange criticize reinforce cooperate etc.Social learning http://www.francoisguite.com/2007/10/constructivisme-socioconstructivisme-et-connectivisme/
  • 70. search link synthesize share collaborate publish etc.Linking knowledge http://www.francoisguite.com/2007/10/constructivisme-socioconstructivisme-et-connectivisme/
  • 71. constructivist methods■ cooperative learning■ action learning■ authentic learning■ project-based learning source: Nicole Tardif
  • 72. cognitivist appoaches■ strategic learning■ cognitive style■ metacognition■ knowledge transfer■ explicit teaching of strategies source: Nicole Tardif
  • 73. individualized approaches■ personalized programmes■ modular learning■ e-learning■ self-regulation of learning■ flipped instruction source: Nicole Tardif / François Guité
  • 74. individualized approaches■ personalized programmes■ modular learning■ e-learning■ self-regulation of learning■ flipped instruction source: Nicole Tardif / François Guité
  • 75. connectivist approaches‟ Connectivism is the theory that knowledge is now distributed through a network of connections, and therefore that knowledge lies in the hability to built and navigate within those networks. (Siemens, G. et Downes, S., 2010)
  • 76. connectivist approaches■ social media■ online communities■ social learning■ informal learning■ mobile learning source: François Guité
  • 77. BYOD(Bring Your Own Device)
  • 78. Affordances
  • 79. If schools cannot integrateinformation and cognitive technology,the latter will integrate education.
  • 80. My own experience
  • 81. Thank you!Download the slideshow at is.gd/4sYC0B francoisguite.com francoisguite.posterous.com twitter.com/FrancoisGuite gplus.to/FrancoisGuite delicious.com/guitef