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D10.06.01.abstract
 

D10.06.01.abstract

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    D10.06.01.abstract D10.06.01.abstract Document Transcript

    • The impact of steam utilization on the behaviour of high temperature electrolysers: a model-based understanding Q. Cai1, E. Luna-Ortiz2, N. P. Brandon1 Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, UK Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, UK Email:q.cai@imperial.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0) 207 594 7366 Abstract: Water electrolysis is capable of producing carbon-free hydrogen if used in conjunction with renewable or nuclear energy. The electrolysis process at elevated temperature, which consumes less electrical energy than the conventional electrolysis process at low temperature, may offer a promising route to future hydrogen production. High temperature electrolysis is performed using a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). Before commercialization of this technology, it is essential to develop an understanding of how different operating conditions influence the performance of the SOEC. In support of this we have developed a one-dimensional model of a cathode- supported planar SOEC stack using the gPROMS modeling tool. The model takes into account the electrochemical reactions, mass balance and energy balance in the stack. It can be employed to investigate the behaviour of high temperature electrolysis operated under different conditions, and the dynamic response of the electrolyser to changes in hydrogen demand. Here we report our study on the operation of the SOEC stack model at different steam utilization factors (50% - 90%), different operating temperatures (750- 850 ºC) and different current densities (0.5 -1.0 A/cm2), with and without a temperature control strategy applied to the stack. Our results show that steam utilization is a key factor that influences the operating potential and temperature distribution along the stack. The influence of the steam utilization factor also couples with operating temperature and current density.