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Educational issues- Classroom Management and Behaviour Issues

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  • Students need a sense of community. A place that forms relationships, responsibilities and a place where students can experience success Classroom management and behaviour issues are directly related to how students feel. If they are safe, comfortable and supported in there learning, then behaviour issues are reduced. If students feel that they are not a valued, or they do not participate, then teachers are faced with students who can disrupt their learning environments.
  • A teachers beliefs and attitudes can have and do have, an influence on the students and the classroom environment how the teacher chooses to deal with any issues and the behaviour they demonstrate in response to the issues will model and demonstrate to students how to act in challenging situations or when there is conflict , Unprepared and thoughtless responses to behaviour issues in class add to conflict or create more negative feelings for students
  • When teachers let their frustrations with students become personal, cynicism and friction can develop. The belief teachers have of their students can have a direct effect on the students’ failures and successes. At risk students will look around their environments and surroundings and see little to strive for and motivate them to achieve. These students present a profound challenge for teachers. negative perspective will have a direct influence on the type of behaviour the students demonstrates. Therefore classroom management must be organised and ready to deal with at risk students effectively. classroom management needs to be used in a way that focuses on changing the environment as opposed to trying to change an individual’s behaviour (Henley, 2006).
  • Adolescents hav e egocentric behaviour and go through pahses explore ing different identities. With most teens, this includes and phase of rebellion. They can also be more sensitive and argumentative at the same time .
  • Now we will discuss the value and benefits of different approaches to behaviour issues. Autocratic, teacher centred, passive learning and controlled classroom management VS Democratic, student led, interactive learning, activity centred, and co-constructed management.
  • In an autocratic classroom, the teacher dictates and the students comply. Autocratic teaching looks for obedience and curricula control. When compliance is the goal of classroom management, students do not have the opportunity to learn traits of responsible behaviour such ad co-operation, reflection, and respect for others
  • Autocratic and traditional forms of corrective behaviour management strategies use punishment to change behaviour. The logic behind using punishment is that a punishment is a consequence that will decrease the probability that the behaviour will reoccur. Autocratic and authoritarian teaching will have people believe that a well-managed class is a quiet class. This may seem like students are learning and the teacher is seen as having control over the students. This is a simple solution for behaviour management issues, but it can prove to be more damaging to student achievement in the long-term. Long periods of passivity restrict student engagement and stifles creative thought
  • A classroom that demonstrates democratic values increase student motivation. They are more willing to participate and learn because students are allowed input into the classroom activities. The greater the participation, the fewer amounts of behaviour issues will occur. When dealing with misbehaviour in a class that values a democratic approach, teachers administer discipline judiciously.
  • Students are allowed to voice their side of events and it is respected and taken into consideration by staff. students can experience participating fully in democratic process by allowing students to establish rules for behaviour and sanctions
  • Individual lessons should involve a variety of components to help students maintain attention. Movement is the only experience that unites all levels of activity in the brain. Sitting for more then 10 minutes does limit a student’s awareness of physical and emotional sensations. The more opportunities students have to move and change positions, the better they will behave (Henley, 2006).
  • Students should move around the room and talk together when they perform activities. In activity centred lessons, teachers include variety in curriculum and content, co-operative learning, peer tutoring, learning centres, role-play, brainstorming, and discussion
  • In summary; An autocratic style is when the teacher dictates what will happen and how it will happen. A democratic style attempts to involve students in decision-making and appeals to the students’ intrinsic motivation.
  • need to be implemented and planned before the first lesson with students. The first meeting is important because the earlier the teacher is able to establish rules and expectations, the easier the rest of the year will be
  • Possible important information for teachers to know includes; possible behaviour problems, specific learning and physical needs of individuals, and also knowing student names and how to pronounce them.  
  • Rodgers (1990) has stated that classroom management is gained through consistent discipline. Three common discipline strategies that teachers should used are:   Preventative Discipline –         Clear establishment with the class         Clear expectations about work, tasks etc         Attractive and welcoming environment         Well-planned room organisation, (seating, movement capability, access to equipment, clear labels).         Adequate resources         Organising curriculum to cater for mixed abilities
  • Corrective Discipline –         What is said, how it is said and when teachers say it in relation to off-task behaviour.         Tactical ignoring of some behaviours         Casual and direct questioning         Simple warnings or directions         Defusing or re-directing potential conflict         Reminding of rules         Giving simple choices         Taking students aside from the group         Using appropriate time out.
  • Supportive Discipline –         Following up of disruptions later when the initial ‘heat has subsided.         Encouraging students wherever possible         Re-establishing working relationships with disciplined students         Developing and maintaining a climate of respect         Building a positive classroom tone         Applying a team approach to solving discipline
  • K eep ing students on task and prevent ing disruptive behaviour can be achieved by trying to maximise Academic Learning Time (A . L . T). A . L . T increases engagement and maximises learning (Wilkins, 1987). A . L . T is achieved by specifically allocating time for students to be exposed to variations in teaching in learning styles and related activities. Engaged time is when students are actively involved with the focus of the lesson and on task.
  • Being efficient in giving clear, brief and effective instructions is another preventative strategy. If students are clear on what they have to do and understand the reason why they are doing it, the possibility of off-task behaviour is reduced. This is because a lot of low-level off-task behaviour is due to students not understanding what is expected or how to complete a ta s k (Wilkins, 1987). teachers need to ensure that the work set is achievable yet challenging for students. Students can engage and achieve when they experience success
  • Henley (2006), suggests that the following solutions for behaviour issues in class develop over time and that they will be deliberately implemented in order to improve. They include: Smooth transitions are an effective management strategy. This requires the teacher to be efficient, have little down time and manage distractions. They must clearly communicate a way of getting students to respond, either with visual or verbal cues . Another strategy related to communications is the need for clear instructions. Good preventative management lies in being able to get students to value and respect when others are talking (Wilkins, 1987) . Accountability Procedures – Group responsibility / Individual Accountability. Make students accountable in lessons by; Randomly asking questions to see if students have completed tasks. Being ‘With It’ – Make students feel as though you have eyes in the back of the head. Establishing Routines – Ensure that daily routines are efficient and well handled . Keeping Students Alert – Ensure that they stay engaged through the use of voice variations, movement around class, a variety of teaching methods, and randomly asking questions.
  • Democratic classroom management and effective solutions to behaviour issues involve a different and modern approach to discipline. This concept is known as disciplining with dignity (Henley, 2006). Respect is paramount from teachers and students, but even more so when misbehaviour occurs. The teacher must always give respect. They must hold the moral high ground, not take issues personally, and teachers must allow students the opportunity to reflect on their poor behaviour.

Educational issues- Classroom Management and Behaviour Issues Educational issues- Classroom Management and Behaviour Issues Presentation Transcript

  • Educational Issue: Behaviour Issues and Classroom Management. What Is the Best Approach?
  • Part 1 . Identify and explore Behaviour issues and classroom management.
  • Importance of classroom management
    • Students need to feel a sense of community.
    • Relationships and Experiences.
    • Classroom management and behaviour issues are directly relate to how students feel.
  • Issues relating to behaviour and manaegment
    • A teachers beliefs and values influence classroom environment .
    • The teacher models and demonstrate to students how to act.
    • Unprepared responses add to conflict or negative feelings for students.
  • Issues relating to behaviour and manaegment
    • At risk students see little to strive for.
    • Negative perspective will have a direct influence on the type of behaviour the students demonstrates.
    • Classroom management needs to chang the environment, not try to change an individual’s behaviour (Henley, 2006).
  • Issues relating to behaviour and manaegment
    • Typical Adolescent behaviour :
    • E egocentric
    • E exploring different identities.
    • R ebellion.
    • S ensitive and argumentative
  • Part 2. Discussion on the different approaches to behaviour issues and classroom management.
  • Different Approaches to the Issue:
    • Autocratic, teacher centred, passive learning and controlled classroom management
    • Vs
    • Democratic, student led, interactive learning, activity centred, and co-constructed management
  • Autocratic Managment
    • The teacher dictates and students comply.
    • It values and looks for obedience and curricula control.
    • When compliance is the goal of classroom management, students do not have the opportunity to learn.
  • Autocratic Managment
    • Punishment used to change behaviour.
    • Enforces consequences that will decrease the likelyhood of poor behaviour in the future.
    • Autocratic teaching believes that a well-managed class is a quiet class.
  • Democratic Managment
    • Values the need to increase student motivation.
    • Students are allowed more input into classroom activities. This increases participation and reduces the anount of behaviour issues.
  • Democratic Managment
    • Students are allowed to voice their persective and it is respected by staff.
    • Students can experience participating fully in democratic process by allowing students to establish their own rules for behaviour and sanctions.
  • Democratic Managment
    • Involves a variety of components to maintain students attention.
    • Movement is the only experience that unites all levels of activity in the brain.
    • The more opportunities students have to move and change positions, the better they will behave (Henley, 2006).
  • Democratic Managment
    • Students should be allowed to move and talk together during activities. Activity centred lessons include variety in;
      • curriculum and content,
      • co-operative learning,
      • peer tutoring,
      • learning centres,
      • role-play,
      • brainstorming, and discussion
  • Democratic Managment
    • An autocratic style is when the teacher dictates what will happen and how it will happen.
    • A democratic style attempts to involve students in decision-making and appeals to the students’ intrinsic motivation.
  • Part 3. Solutions to behaviour issues and classroom management strategies:
  • Solutions
    • Strategies and actions n eed to be planned and implemented early.
    • T eacher s must establish rules and expectations early to ensure students know the boundaries.
  • Solutions
    • Teachers should aim to know information on their students. This includes:
      • P ossible behaviour problems
      • S pecific learning and physical need
      • S student names and how to pronounce them.
    •  
  • D iscipline strategies
    • M anagement is gained through consistent discipline. Three common discipline strategies are;
    • Preventative Discipline . This includes;
    • Clear expectations
    • A n a ttractive and welcoming environment
    • W ell-planned room organisation
    • Adequate resources
    • Organising curriculum to cater for mixed abilities
  • D iscipline strategies
    • 2. Corrective Discipline . This includes;
    • T eachers behaviours and reactions
    • Casual and direct questioning
    • Simple warnings or directions
    • Defusing or re-directing potential conflict
    • Reminding of rules
    • Giving simple choices
    • Taking students aside from the grou p
    • Using appropriate time out.
  • D iscipline strategies
    • 3. Supportive Discipline includes;
    • Following up o n disruptions
    • Encouraging students
    • Re-establishing working relationships
    • Developing and maintaining respect
    • Building a positive classroom
    • Applying a team approach
  • Preventitive Managment
    • M aximis ing Academic Learning Time (ALT)
    • ALT increases engagement
    • ALT is achieved by specifically allocating time for variations in teaching
  • Preventitive Managment
    • Give clear, brief and effective instructions
    • A lot of low-level off-task behaviour is from students not understanding
    • Work must be achievable yet challenging for students.
    • Students will engage and achieve when they experience success
  • Preventitive Managment
    • Henley (2006), suggests that solutions for behaviour issues develop over time. Solutions include:
    • Smooth transitions
    • Clear instructions
    • Accountability Procedures
    • Being ‘With It’
    • Establishing Routines
    • Keeping Students Alert
  • Preventitive Managment
    • Democratic solutions involve disciplining with dignity .
    • Respect is paramount. Teachers must hold the moral high ground.
    • Teachers must allow students the opportunity to reflect on their poor behaviour.
  • References
    • Cowley, S. (2003). Managing the first meeting . Getting the buggers to behave 2
    • (pp.15-16). London: Continuum.
    •  
    • Cowley, S. (2003). Behaviour management in the secondary school . Getting the
    • buggers to behave 2 (pp.166-175). London: Continuum.
    •  
    • Henley, M. (2006). Classroom management: A proactive approach (pp. 30-50). Upper
    • Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
    •  
    • Rodgers, B. (1990). You Know the Fair Rule . London: Longman
    •  
    • Sen, C. (2003). Classroom Management in a Secondary School. Retrieved September
    • 19 th , 2010 form
    • http://ezinearticles.com/?Classroom-Management-in-a-Secondary-School&id=1497548
    •  
    • Wilkins, R. (1987). Classroom Management . Set No.1. Western Australian Institute
    • of Technology.