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Jordan
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Jordan

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This slide show is dealing with Famous ruins in Jordan .It is designed by a group of my students . …

This slide show is dealing with Famous ruins in Jordan .It is designed by a group of my students .
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  • Hi,
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    i am not doing too much, i am doing that what i think it has to be done ....
    my solution for recession is universalisation, means evaluate all resourcess and assets of universe and then apply necessary sum of new currency (Zik=100$) to pay all debts and to buy off all taxes from national governments ....
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    contact me on zikalkis@gmail.com
       Reply 
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  • 1. Some Jordanian Ruins
  • 2. Karak castle
    • The crusader castle at Karak ( also spelt Kerak ) was begun in 1142 by Paganus Pincerna, Lord of Oultrejourain . Although of fairly primitive construction compared with the Crac des Chevaliers, the builders of Karak made the most of its position on a triangular ridge which dominates a key route down to the Dead Sea . Perhaps the most impressive feature of their work is the magnificent steeply sloping glacis made of closely fitted smooth stones . As with the similar glacis at the Crac, climbing this would have been incredibly difficult for would - be attackers . This photograph shows the southern end of the castle, its weakest point because of the proximity of another hill ( now the suburb of al - Thallaja, from where the pic was taken ). The massive stone keep at this end is a Mameluke construction, replacing the original defenses which were damaged when Saladin beseiged the castle in 1184 .
  • 3. Petra
    • Petra is the treasure of ancient world, hidden behind an almost impenetrable barrier of rugged mountains, boasting incomparable scenes that make it the most majestic and imposing ancient site still - standing nowadays .. It has been said " perhaps there is nothing in the world that resembles it ", actually, for sure , there is nothing in the world that resembles it . The rock - carved rose - red city of Petra is full of mysterious charm , it was " designed to strike wonder into all who entered it ".
  • 4.
    • Petra is considered the most famous and gorgeous site in Jordan located about 262 km south of Amman and 133 km north of Aqaba.It is the legacy of the Nabataeans, an industrious Arab people who settled in southern Jordan more than 2000 years ago . Admired then for its refined culture, massive architecture and ingenious complex of dams and water channels, Petra is now a UNESCO world heritage site and one of The New 7 Wonders of the World that enchants visitors from all corners of the globe .
    • The approach through a kilometer long, cool, and gloom chasm ( or Siq ) a long narrow gorge whose steeply rising sides all but obliterate the sun, provides a dramatic contrast with the magic to come .
  • 5.
    • The Petra basin boasts over 800 individual monuments , including buildings, tombs, baths, funerary halls, temples, arched gateways, and colonnaded streets, that were mostly carved from the kaleidoscopic sandstone by the technical and artistic genius of its inhabitants .
    • Petra sights are at their best in early morning and late afternoon, when the sun warms the multicolored stones, you can view the majesty of Petra as it was seen first when discovered in 1812 after being lost by the 16th century for almost 300 years !  
  • 6. Wadi Rum
    • A journey to Wadi Rum is a journey to another world . A vast, silent place, timeless and starkly beautiful .. Wadi Rum is one of Jordan's main tourist attractions being the most stunning desertscape in the World, lying 320 km southwest of Amman , 120 0 km south of Petra and only 68 km north ofAqaba.
    • Uniquely shaped massive mountains rise vertically out of the pink desert sand, which separate one dark mass from another in a magnificent desert scenery of strange breathtaking beauty, with towering cliffs of weathered stone.. The faces of the sheer rock cliffs have been eroded by the wind into faces of men, animals and monsters.
    • Wadi Rum is probably best known because of its connection with the enigmatic British officer T . E . Lawrence , who was based here during the Great Arab Revolt of 1917-18, and as the setting for the film that carried his name " Lawrence of Arabia ".
    • Everywhere in this moonscape place are indications of man's presence since the earliest known times. Scattered around are flint hand axes, while on the rocks at the feet of the mountains the names of ancient travellers are scratched. All around, there is emptiness and silence. In this immense space, man is dwarfed to insignificance .
  • 7.
    • There are many ways to explore this fragile, unspoiled desert retreat . Serious trekkers will be drawn to Wadi Rum, with challenging climbs some 1750 m high, while casual hikers can enjoy an easy course through the colorful hills and canyons . Naturalists will be drawn to the desert in springtime, when rains bring the greening of the hills and an explosion of 2000 species of wildflowers . Red anemones, poppies and the striking black iris, Jordan's national flower, all grow at will by the roadside and in more quiet reaches .
    • Stunning in its natural beauty, Wadi Rum epitomizes the romance of the desert . Now the home of several Bedouin tribes , Wadi Rum has been inhabited for generations . These hospitable and friendly desert people are settled in Wadi Rum in scattered nomadic camps throughout the area . Visitors who are invited to share mint tea or cardamon coffee in their black tents, perhaps sitting by the fire under a starry desert sky, will have an experience not to be forgotten .
  • 8. Aqaba
    • Aqaba is well known for its beach resorts and luxury hotels, which service those who come for fun in the sand as well as watersports like windsurfing and sckouba diving . It also offers activities which take advantage of its desert location . Its many coffee shops offer mansaf and knafeh , and baqlawa desserts . Another very popular venue is the Turkish Bata ( Hamam in which locals and visitors alike come to relax after a hot day .
    • In 2006, the Tourism Division of the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority ( ASEZA ) which runs the city held a public awareness campaign to encourage Jordanians to visit the city as tourists . The campaign consisted mainly of writing articles printed in the local media to encourage people from all over Jordan to visit the city . At of the end of the campaign ASEZA officials praised it, and said many locals came to Aqaba that year, something that will no doubt continue in the following year
  • 9.
    • Today, the campaign has gone international to different countries of Europe. The aim is to encourage those from as far as Sweden and Norway to Spain, UK, Poland and Italy to come to Aqaba. Its already bearing fruit.
    • Aqaba has been chosen for the sight of a new waterfront building project that would rebuild Aqaba with new man-made water structures, new high-rise residential and office buildings, and more tourist services to place Aqaba on the investment map and challenge other centers of waterfront development throughout the region.
    • The Distant Festival held at Aqaba on the last Thursday of July and the following day at Aqaba and Wadi Rum which features the world's most famous trance and electronica dancers.
  • 10. Dead Sea
    • Deep in the Jordan Valley and 55 km southeast of Amman, is the Dead Sea, one of the most spectacular natural and spiritual landscapes in the whole world. It is the lowest body of water on earth, the lowest point on earth, and the world's richest source of natural salts, hiding wonderful treasures that accumulated throughout thousands of years.
    • To reach this unique spot, the visitor enjoys a short 30 minutes drive from Amman, surrounded by a landscape and arid hills, which could be from another planet. En route a stone marker indicates "Sea Level", but the Dead Sea itself is not reached before descending another 400 meters below this sign.
  • 11.
    • The sunset touching distant hills with ribbons of fire across the waters of the Dead Sea brings a sense of unreality to culminate a day's visit to this region. It is normally as calm as a millpond, with barely a ripple disturbing its surface, but it can become turbulent. During most days, however, the water shimmers under a beating sun. Where rocks meet its lapping edges, they become snow-like, covered with a thick, gleaming white deposit that gives the area a strange and surreal sense.
    • As its name evokes, the Dead Sea is devoid of life due to an extremely high content of salts and minerals which gives its waters the renowned curative powers, therapeutic qualities, and its buoyancy, recognized since the days of Herod the Great, more than 2000 years ago.
  • 12.
    • And because the salt content is four times that of most world's oceans, you can float in the Dead Sea without even trying, which makes swimming here a truly unique experience not to be missed: here is the only place in the world where you can recline on the water to read a newspaper.
    • Scientifically speaking, its water contains more than 35 different types of minerals that are essential for the health and care of the body skin including Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium, Bromine, Sulfur, and Iodine. They are well known for relieving pains and sufferings caused by arthritis, rheumatism, psoriasis, eczema, headache and foot-ache, while nourishing and softening the skin. They also provide the raw materials for the renowned Jordanian Dead Sea bath salts and cosmetic products marketed worldwide.
  • 13.
    • And because the salt content is four times that of most world's oceans, you can float in the Dead Sea without even trying, which makes swimming here a truly unique experience not to be missed: here is the only place in the world where you can recline on the water to read a newspaper.
    • Scientifically speaking, its water contains more than 35 different types of minerals that are essential for the health and care of the body skin including Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium, Bromine, Sulfur, and Iodine. They are well known for relieving pains and sufferings caused by arthritis, rheumatism, psoriasis, eczema, headache and foot-ache, while nourishing and softening the skin. They also provide the raw materials for the renowned Jordanian Dead Sea bath salts and cosmetic products marketed worldwide.
  • 14.
    • And because the salt content is four times that of most world's oceans, you can float in the Dead Sea without even trying, which makes swimming here a truly unique experience not to be missed: here is the only place in the world where you can recline on the water to read a newspaper.
    • Scientifically speaking, its water contains more than 35 different types of minerals that are essential for the health and care of the body skin including Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium, Bromine, Sulfur, and Iodine. They are well known for relieving pains and sufferings caused by arthritis, rheumatism, psoriasis, eczema, headache and foot-ache, while nourishing and softening the skin. They also provide the raw materials for the renowned Jordanian Dead Sea bath salts and cosmetic products marketed worldwide.
  • 15.
    • A unique combination of several factors makes Dead Sea's total attraction: the chemical composition of its water, the filtered sunrays and oxygen-rich air, the mineral-rich black mud along the shoreline, and the adjacent fresh water and thermal mineral springs.
    • Although sparsely populated and serenely quiet now, the area has a historical and spiritual legacy of its own. It is believed to be the site of five biblical cities: Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zebouin and Zoar.
    • A series of new roads, hotels and archaeological discoveries are converging to make this region as enticing to international visitors today as it was to kings, emperors, traders and prophets in antiquity.
    • Seaside facilities include modern hotels with therapeutic clinics and restaurant/bathing/sports complexes, meeting the needs of day visitors or parties wishing to spend the night amidst one of the most dramatic and moving landscapes in the World.
  • 16. Jarash
    • Jarash, located 48 km north of Amman and nestled in a quiet valley among the mountains of Gilead, is the grandeur of Imperial Rome being one of the largest and most well preserved sites of Roman architecture in the World outside Italy. To this day, its paved and colonnaded streets, soaring hilltop temples, handsome theaters, spacious public squares and plazas, baths, fountains and city walls pierced by towers and gates remain in exceptional condition.
    • This fascinating city makes a great day-trip from Amman, particularly in spring, when the wildflowers are in bloom. The drive will take you less than an hour, but will transport you 2000 years back in time.
  • 17.
    • Within the remaining city walls, archeologists have found the ruins of settlements dating back to the Neolithic Age, indicating human occupation of this location for more than 6500 years. This is not surprising, as the area is ideally suited for human habitation. Jerash has a year-round supply of water, while its altitude of 500 meters gives it a temperate climate and excellent visibility over the surrounding low-lying areas .
    • The history of Jerash is a blend of the Greco-Roman world of the Mediterranean basin and the ancient traditions of the Arab Orient. Indeed, the name of the city itself reflects this interaction. The earliest Arabic/Semitic inhabitants named their village Garshu. The Romans later Hellenised the former Arabic name into Gerasa, and at the end of the 19th century, the Arab and Circassian inhabitants of the small rural settlement transformed the Roman Gerasa into the Arabic Jerash.
  • 18.
    • It was not until the days of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC that Jerash truly began to develop into a sizeable town. But it was during the period of Roman rule that Jerash, then known as Gerasa, enjoyed its golden age.
    • The first known historical reference to Jerash dates back to the 2nd or early 1st century BC. This reference is attributed to Josephus, a historian from the holy land, who referred to it as the the place to which Theodorus, the tyrant of Philadelphia, removed his treasure for safe keeping in the of Zeus. Shortly afterward, Theodorus lost Jerash to Alexander Jannceus, a religious priest.
    • Soon after Rome took control of Syria, Emperor Pompey, in 63 BC, named conquered Jerash as one of the great cities of the Decapolis League. This brought great economic benefits to Jerash and trade flourished with the Nabataean Empire based in Petra.
    • In 106 AD, Emperor Trajan annexed the wealthy Nabataean Kingdom and formed the province of Arabia. This brought even greater trading riches pouring into Jerash, which enjoyed a burst of construction activity. Granite was brought from as far away as Egypt, and old temples were rebuilt according to the latest architectural fashion .
  • 19. Ajloun
    • 73 km north of Amman, and a short journey northwest from Jerash, through a beautiful pine-forest and olive groves, brings you to the town of Ajloun, where Hadrian stayed over the winter of 129-30 AD, and built himself an arch well outside the town, leaving unbonded its sides for future city walls to come out to meet it .
    • Here you will find the Castle of Ajloun or Qalaat Errabadh (Arabic for "Hilltop Castle"), from which there is a splendid view westwards into the Jordan Valley. It looks like a Crusader fortress, but it was built by Muslims in 1184-85 as a military fort and buffer to protect the region from invading Crusader forces. It was built on the orders of the local governor, Ezz Eddin Osama bin Munqethe, a nephew of the Ayyubid leader Salahuddin Al-Ayyoubi (Saladin), as a direct retort to the new Latin castle of Belvoir (Kawkab El-Hawa) on the opposite side of the valley between the Tiberias and Besan, and as a base to develop and control the iron mines of Ajloun.
  • 20.
    • This superb example of Arab and Islamic architecture was built as a rectangle with four square towers and an entrance on the south side dominating a wide stretch of the north Jordan Valley and passages to it. From its hilltop position, the Castle of Ajloun protected the communication routes between south Jordan and Syria, and was one of a chain of forts, which lit beacons at night to pass signals from the Euphrates as far as Cairo.
    • Two years after it was completed the fortress's original purpose had already been outlived, for Salahuddin defeated the Crusaders at the battle of the Horns of Hattin in 1189, which marked the beginning of the end of their occupation of the Holy Land.
  • 21.
    • In 1214-15 the Castle of Ajloun was enlarged by Aybak bin Abdullah, majordomo of the Caliph Al-Muazham Isa; in 1260 it fell to the Mongols, but was later rebuilt by the Egyptian Mamluks. No longer needed for military purposes, it was used as an administrative center responsible to Damascus.
    • Some of the stones with which the castle was built have crosses carved into them, giving credence to a tradition, recounted by a 13th century Arab historian that: "an ancient monastery once stood on the site, inhabited by a Christian named Ajloun; when the monastery fell into ruin, the castle took its place and the name of the monk".
    • The castle today is beautifully preserved and is a popular attraction for foreigners & Jordanians alike. The structures, towers, chambers, galleries and staircases that form part of the town as well as the beautiful scenery that surrounds the hills nearby will captivate you.
  • 22. * Done by the student : Tamara Shibly Madanat * Under the supervison: Reham Habashneh

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