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Interpretation Australia Symposium
November 2010
Presenter: Regan Forrest
Why are we here?
Some theoretical background
Barriers to visitor engagement
Taking a step out – learning from others
Stepp...
EVERYTHING you do is saying something to
your visitors . . .
Welcome
aWareness
Walking your talk
PERSONAL
SOCIO-
CULTURAL
PHYSICAL
Contextual model
of learning:
(Falk & Dierking 2000)
A word association exercise . . .
1. Not Maslow again!!!!! Where’s the door????
2. OK, yeah . . . let’s have another look
...
Desperate for the loo 3yo twins acting upI’m lost
Sore feetDo I belong here? I’m hungry
I don’t ‘get’ it
Information
overl...
Physical
Conceptual
Virtual
Do your services reflect visitor usage and
needs, or internal management structures?
Retail and catering
Experience matching marketing material
Security vs Welcoming
Does your institution walk its mission ‘t...
Right idea (maybe); wrong audience
Diverting energy from what audience values
(not always about doing MORE)
Are there well...
Consider what barriers to
audience engagement might
exist in your organisation:
1. Barriers
2. Inconsistencies
3. Blind sp...
Retailers are experts at communicating – both
consciously and subconsciously – messages which
support the buying experienc...
Interpreters are experts at communicating – both
consciously and subconsciously – messages which
support the learning expe...
Customer focus at all levels
Staff empowerment at all levels
Leadership by example
Ongoing monitoring and improvement
Reme...
Adaptation to new
media and social
networks
Capturing
imagination
(but beware the
deflation of
‘oversell’)
Balance between...
What would need
to change to
address your
institutional
barriers?
WHO IS YOUR
INTERNAL TARGET
AUDIENCE?
http://www.theinvisiblegorilla.com/videos.html
In praise of the
humble Post-it
note…
Patterns emerge
Voting, sorting
Depersonalises
ideas
More voices heard
An unfamiliar leisure activity with vaguely
negative assumptions
Assess the experience mindfully:
How do you start?
Do you...
Change permission structures
Bridge silos
Signal to noise: (Disney toilets example)
Walk a mile in my shoes
1. Challenge (Message)
2. Audience
3. Communication Plan
How could you apply interpretive techniques to
create change in y...
Influence beyond a
position on an
organisational chart
Challenge
permission
structures
The power to be
brave; to fail; to
...
How ideas gain
momentum
Mavens,
Connectors,
Salesmen
“Choice
architecture”
Developing
experience-based
business models
New relationships
with audiences
Beyond
demographics to
visitor motivation
Full of practical tips
Case studies and
examples of visitor
participation (easily
adapted to other
scenarios)
Inspiring case study
Journey from vision
to reality
Good example of
walking the talk
Creative business
models
Assessing your
product / experience
mix – does it match
audience
expectations
Speaks the
language...
email: regan@reganforrest.com
blog: http://reganforrest.com
twitter: @interactivate
Forrest interpreter as_advocate
Forrest interpreter as_advocate
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Forrest interpreter as_advocate

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Slides from the 'Interpreter as Advocate' workshop which was run as part of the Interpretation Australia National Symposium, Launceston, TAS, Nov 2010

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Transcript of "Forrest interpreter as_advocate"

  1. 1. Interpretation Australia Symposium November 2010 Presenter: Regan Forrest
  2. 2. Why are we here? Some theoretical background Barriers to visitor engagement Taking a step out – learning from others Stepping back in – using what we know already Action Plan, discussion, follow-up reading
  3. 3. EVERYTHING you do is saying something to your visitors . . . Welcome aWareness Walking your talk
  4. 4. PERSONAL SOCIO- CULTURAL PHYSICAL Contextual model of learning: (Falk & Dierking 2000)
  5. 5. A word association exercise . . . 1. Not Maslow again!!!!! Where’s the door???? 2. OK, yeah . . . let’s have another look 3. Maslow’s Pyramid? That’s not in Egypt is it?
  6. 6. Desperate for the loo 3yo twins acting upI’m lost Sore feetDo I belong here? I’m hungry I don’t ‘get’ it Information overload INTERPRETIVE “ENLIGHTENMENT” This coffee’s bad I’m not buying that cheap tat Well I never knew that! We’ve had a nice day Sorry, I didn’t know I wasn’t supposed to do that What a rip-off! Where is your ‘acceptability threshold?’
  7. 7. Physical Conceptual Virtual Do your services reflect visitor usage and needs, or internal management structures?
  8. 8. Retail and catering Experience matching marketing material Security vs Welcoming Does your institution walk its mission ‘talk’?
  9. 9. Right idea (maybe); wrong audience Diverting energy from what audience values (not always about doing MORE) Are there well-meaning but misdirected efforts in your organisation?
  10. 10. Consider what barriers to audience engagement might exist in your organisation: 1. Barriers 2. Inconsistencies 3. Blind spots 4. Misalignment 5. Superfluous services
  11. 11. Retailers are experts at communicating – both consciously and subconsciously – messages which support the buying experience. Some shoppers are novelty seekers, others like the reassurance of the familiar. Retailers need to accommodate both of these groups, or decide specifically to focus on a market niche. Retailers are increasingly drawing upon psychological and ethnographic research to enable them to design retail spaces in a way that maximises buying. Anything that makes the buying experience more difficult than it should be is removed or changed. Effort is expended in ways that maximise sales.
  12. 12. Interpreters are experts at communicating – both consciously and subconsciously – messages which support the learning experience. Some visitors are novelty seekers, others like the reassurance of the familiar. Interpreters need to accommodate both of these groups, or decide specifically to focus on an audience niche. Interpreters are increasingly drawing upon psychological and ethnographic research to enable them to design interpretive spaces in a way that maximises learning. Anything that makes the learning experience more difficult than it should be is removed or changed. Effort is expended in ways that maximise engagement.
  13. 13. Customer focus at all levels Staff empowerment at all levels Leadership by example Ongoing monitoring and improvement Remembering and rewarding loyalty Respectful, communicative and responsive Customer is not necessarily always right, but make sure they’re wrong with dignity It’s not my fault, but it is my problem
  14. 14. Adaptation to new media and social networks Capturing imagination (but beware the deflation of ‘oversell’) Balance between listening and LEADERSHIP
  15. 15. What would need to change to address your institutional barriers? WHO IS YOUR INTERNAL TARGET AUDIENCE?
  16. 16. http://www.theinvisiblegorilla.com/videos.html
  17. 17. In praise of the humble Post-it note… Patterns emerge Voting, sorting Depersonalises ideas More voices heard
  18. 18. An unfamiliar leisure activity with vaguely negative assumptions Assess the experience mindfully: How do you start? Do you know what you need to know when you need it? Do you have ‘fitting in’ issues? Are your preconceptions unwarranted Take-home messages for your own institution? Alternative – “accompany a fan”
  19. 19. Change permission structures Bridge silos Signal to noise: (Disney toilets example) Walk a mile in my shoes
  20. 20. 1. Challenge (Message) 2. Audience 3. Communication Plan How could you apply interpretive techniques to create change in your organisation?
  21. 21. Influence beyond a position on an organisational chart Challenge permission structures The power to be brave; to fail; to succeed
  22. 22. How ideas gain momentum Mavens, Connectors, Salesmen “Choice architecture”
  23. 23. Developing experience-based business models New relationships with audiences Beyond demographics to visitor motivation
  24. 24. Full of practical tips Case studies and examples of visitor participation (easily adapted to other scenarios)
  25. 25. Inspiring case study Journey from vision to reality Good example of walking the talk
  26. 26. Creative business models Assessing your product / experience mix – does it match audience expectations Speaks the language of business
  27. 27. email: regan@reganforrest.com blog: http://reganforrest.com twitter: @interactivate
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