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Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
Big stories in small places
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Big stories in small places

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Seminar presented to Flinders University Archaeology Department, 29th March 2012

Seminar presented to Flinders University Archaeology Department, 29th March 2012

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  • 1. Big Stories in Small PlacesReflecting community identitythrough the interpretation ofheritage sites
  • 2. A tale of two cities . . .• Rome, NY, USA ▫ Fort Stanwix National Monument• Adelaide Australia Adelaide, ▫ West Terrace Cemetery
  • 3. Fort Stanwix National Monument
  • 4. All roads lead to . . .
  • 5. All roads lead to . . .
  • 6. All roads lead to . . .
  • 7. The Oneida Carry ( y (Deowainsta) )
  • 8. Strategic Position of the Carry g y
  • 9. Site History y• 1758 - 1774 Fort built & occupied by the British• 1776 American f 6A i forces occupy “Fort S h l ” “F Schuyler”• 1777 21-day siege of the Fort ▫ Battle of Oriskany ▫ Victory at Saratoga• 1781 Fort destroyed• 1784 Treaty of Fort Stanwix• 1830 City of Rome grows over site
  • 10. Rebuilding Fort Stanwix g• 1970-1973 archaeological excavations
  • 11. Fort Stanwix as Heritage Destination• 1977 opened as NPS site• 2005 Willett Center opened (NAI Award 2006)
  • 12. Fort Stanwix now . . .
  • 13. Willett Center• Archaeological collection (400,000+ it ( items) )• Interpretive context for site: i • Where does Fort Stanwix fi i S i fit into the h American Story?
  • 14. Interpretive approach p pp• Chronological, taking multiple viewpoints: ▫ “Catherine” – Palatine German Colonial Woman Catherine ▫ “Wali” – Oneida Bear Clan Mother ▫ “Douglas” – Scottish trader and Indian Agent g g ▫ “Henrick” – young Dutchman who joins Patriot Army• Nuanced perspective with no “good guys” or “bad “b d guys” ”
  • 15. Exhibition OverviewAV1– 1784 Views to FortIntro AV2– AV3– Taking Siege / Sides Oriskany
  • 16. Interpretive Challenges p g• Negotiating balance between voices• Quality and availability of historical and archaeological resources h l i l• ‘Scripting’ the experience
  • 17. Reflecting the community g y• Placing Rome as the site of an important national story•T Tourism as an economic regenerator i i t• The Oneida as “America’s First Allies”
  • 18. West Terrace Cemetery
  • 19. Brief Site History y• 1837 Light’s Plan, first documented burials 1840• 1843 First denominational divisions• 1903 Australia’s first purpose-built crematorium• 1920 Australia s first dedicated AIF cemetery Australia’s• 1970s cemetery’s future in doubt• 2008 Interpretation Plan• 2011 Heritage Highlights Trail (SA Tourism Award)
  • 20. Then and Now Site sketches from “The End of the Road” by Nicol
  • 21. Interpretive Approach p pp• Cemeteries as a window into broader society: ▫ Universal themes associated with death, faith, family and community• A reflection of SA’s history and culture ▫ Ideals of a free settlement ▫ Religion, politics and personalities• R l t to other sites and stories Relate t th it d t i ▫ William Baker Ashton & Adelaide Gaol ▫ Caroline Emily Clark memorial & Migration Museum (Destitute Asylum) ▫ George William Francis & Adelaide Botanic Gardens
  • 22. Multilayered Interpretation y p• Range of topics to frame the cemetery visit ▫ Eminent South Australians ▫ Trailblazing Women ▫ Beliefs, Attitudes and Customs ▫ Insights into the Everyday ▫ Cemetery Developments (Natural Heritage)
  • 23. Heritage Highlights Trail g g g • Self-guided 2 km loop • 29 sign points, ~40 plots • Powerbrokers, political agitators, veterans, artists, scientists, clergy, citizens, entrepreneurs. . .
  • 24. Site SignageSi Si
  • 25. Complex Stories: Telegraph Memorial• Politics of exploration and exploitation of inner Australia• Communications revolution of the time• Link to other characters: ▫ William Auld the explorer ▫ Henry Ayers the funder ▫ Afghan cameleers• Monumental symbolism• Stories of the men memorialised• Inescapable reminder of past attitudes
  • 26. Complex Stories: Telegraph Memorial• Politics of exploration and exploitation of inner Australia• Communications revolution of the time• Link to other characters: ▫ William Auld the explorer ▫ Henry Ayers the funder ▫ Afghan cameleers• Monumental symbolism• Stories of the men memorialised• Inescapable reminder of past attitudes
  • 27. Interpretive Challenges: p p g practical• Operating cemetery• Balance between visibility and impact• Trail length and complexity• Sensitive negotiations with stakeholders
  • 28. Interpretive Challenges: conceptual p g p• Overlapping and sometimes competing stories: ▫ Ph i l developments Physical d l t ▫ Social/political developments ▫ Individual characters• Interpreting features that are ‘of their time’ ▫ Past prejudices p j ▫ Cultural codes• Abstract ideas vs. Concrete features• Site history vs. Site mythology
  • 29. Reflecting the community g y• Distinct founding ideals of South Australia• Denominational diversity – “City of Churches”•T Tension between conservatism and i b t ti d progressiveness• Patterns of immigration
  • 30. Some closing musings g g• Interpretation is a way of presenting ourselves• Are we taking people beyond the “front room”?• H it Heritage sites as creators and reflectors of it t d fl t f community identity• Balance between a voice of authority and challenging of orthodoxy h ll i f th d

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