• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Website usability best practices   a marketing perspective
 

Website usability best practices a marketing perspective

on

  • 1,366 views

USABILITY: Wikipedia definition: A term used to denote the ease with which people can employ a particular tool ...

USABILITY: Wikipedia definition: A term used to denote the ease with which people can employ a particular tool

Providing people an easy to use service for a need
The user should know exactly where she is, and should know fairly well what’s next

For an application site, giving access to start of all use-cases is critical

Be available to help users (just like in a real world store, office)

Allow users to easily recover from mistakes

Make it easy to recover from system failures

The ultimate in giving control to the user!

Gives the user higher sense of control

Remember what the user did last, and if appropriate, start from there – logins, passwords, recent searches, recent transactions, etc.

Make things look as you want users to interact with them (affordance)

If an interaction has been made simple, check if you can make it simpler!

Focusing on Usability is no different than focusing on Customer Experience!

And marketers ARE focused on Customer Experience

It is just that Customer Experience in context of web applications has become a specialized science, and Marketers need to focus on it

Usability of your systems can increase ROI. Some examples:

“We want to increase the registration rate on our site from the current 3%, to 5% or above.” [Web2.0 Photo Application Site]

“The average time it takes our customer service representative (CSR) to service a customer is about 8 minutes. We wish to reduce this to 6.5 minutes.” [Banking Firm]

“The average time a customer stands in the queue to transact is about 4 minutes. We wish to reduce it to sub 3 minutes.” [Library]

Is the end-to-end process usable?

Are the different touch points usable?
Lead form fill-up
Call-back, calling process
Application process
Reaction times
Information collateral

Is the customer happy with the product?
Do more in less time
Explore more things that you have on offer

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,366
Views on SlideShare
1,366
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Website usability best practices   a marketing perspective Website usability best practices a marketing perspective Presentation Transcript

    • Website Usability Best Practices: A Marketing Perspective think innovation 1-888-REGALIX | info@regalix-inc.com Palo Alto, USA | Bangalore, India | New Delhi, India | Chandigarh, India © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 1
    • Contents Getting familiar with usabilityMaking a website usable: 10 PrinciplesUsability, Customer Experience & ROI © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 2
    • Usability: What is it??Wikipedia definition: A term used to denote the ease with which people can employ a particular toolProviding people an easy to use service for a need © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 3
    • Unusable Stuff Around Us The audio output of the system can take on one of the modes ROCK, POP or JAZZ. How would you put the system into one of these output modes?Are “Repeat” and “Shuffle”related? How would you change the band from FM to AM? © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 4
    • Unusable Stuff Around Us Which floor is the lift currently on, and what is the Red digital panel next stop? (showing 1)Green digital panel(showing 0) © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 5
    • Unusable Stuff Around UsTouchpad with noaudio (click), visual What would(state of button does visually impairednot change – color, people do?position) or sensory(button does notmove up or down)feedback © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 6
    • Unusable Stuff Around UsWhat does “-” What does “.”stand for? stand for? © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 7
    • Unusable Web Applications/SitesThis is the only album I Where do you thinkhave. But the interface is clicking this link will takenot intelligent enough to me, anyways??detect that. © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 8
    • Unusable Web Applications/Sites It magically takes me to “View & Enhance” tab! With “My Albums” as a sub tab. What is “Next” doing here? I came to this screen just toMy Albums page has “View all Albums”another sub tab called“Albums”. What does itdenote? © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 9
    • Unusable Web Applications/Sites What do you think will happen if I click “Pictures”? (Keep an eye on the “My Albums” tab.© 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 10
    • Unusable Web Applications/Sites The tabs here disappear!!© 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 11
    • ContentsGetting familiar with usability Making a website usable: 7 PrinciplesUsability, Customer Experience & ROI © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 12
    • 1. “Where Am I? Where Else Can I Go?”The user should know exactly where she is, and should know fairly well what’s next Current step Next steps © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 13
    • 1. “Where Am I? Where Else Can I Go?”For an application site, giving access to start of all use-cases is critical For application sites areas such as these need to be carefully designed © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 14
    • 2. Help the User At Every StepProvide users contextual help Contextual help © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 15
    • 2. Help the User At Every StepBe available to help users (just like in a real world store, office)24/7customerservicenumbers Live chat © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 16
    • 3. Be Tolerant: Allow ErrorsAllow users to easily recover from mistakes Make it easy for users to recover from their errors © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 17
    • 3. Be Tolerant: Allow ErrorsMake it easy to recover from system failures Save buttons as intermediate steps, or breaking long tasks into small steps, helps © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 18
    • 3. Be Tolerant: Allow UndoThe ultimate in giving control to the user! Undo © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 19
    • 4. Allow Users to Cancel OperationsGives the user higher sense of control There is no “Cancel” while uploading files. One is not sure if closing the window will cancel the upload. © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 20
    • 5. Remember User ActionsRemember what the user did last, and if appropriate, start from there – logins, passwords, recent searches, recent transactions, etc. Firefox offers to remember the open tabs Remember recent activities © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 21
    • 6. Make Things Look As Per Their FunctionMake things look as you want users to interact with them (affordance) The small dashes make the scroll bar look scrollable The small dots afford the mails being “pulled” and “dragged” © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 22
    • 7. Make It Simpler. Even Simpler!If an interaction has been made simple, check if you can make it simpler!Value proposition inthe headlineSimple demo of howit worksSome more reasons,bulleted © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 23
    • ContentsGetting familiar with usabilityMaking a website usable: 7 Principles Usability, Customer Experience & ROI © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 24
    • Usability and Customer Experience Focusing on Usability is no different than focusing on Customer Experience! And marketers ARE focused on Customer Experience It is just that Customer Experience in context of web applications has All marketers want their users happy! become a specialized science, and Marketers need to focus on it © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 25
    • Usability and ROI Usability of your systems can increase ROI. Some examples:  “We want to increase the registration rate on our site from the current 3%, to 5% or above.” [Web2.0 Photo Application Site]  “The average time it takes our customer service representative (CSR) to service a customer is about 8 minutes. We wish to reduce this to 6.5 minutes.” [Banking Firm]  “The average time a customer stands in the queue to transact is about 4 minutes. We wish to reduce it to sub 3 minutes.” [Library] Usability gives additional ROI © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 26
    • Beyond Website: Systems UsabilityIs the end-to-end process usable?Are the different touch points usable?  Lead form fill-up  Call-back, calling process  Application process  Reaction times  Information collateralIs the customer happy with the product?  Do more in less time  Explore more things that you have on offer © 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 27
    • Thank You!© 2009 Confidential | Think Innovation 28