How to prepare your brand against a possible social media attack ver 1.0

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  • 1. 1
    How to prepare your brand against a social media attack
  • 2. Table of Content
    2
    Why is Social Media Important?
    Can Social Media Go Wrong?
    How to prepare your brand.
    Case Studies
  • 3. 3
    Why is Social Media Important
  • 4. Social Media – some interesting stats
    4
    • 2 out of 3 people on the planet visit social networks (Nielsen, 2009)
    • 5. Visiting social sites is now the fourth most popular online activity—ahead of personal email (Nielsen, 2009)
    • 6. Twitter grew 1382% between February 2008 and February 2009
    • 7. Twitter is expected to have over 100 million users by 2010 and 250 million in 2011
  • Paradigm shift from technology to relationships
    5
    Transactional
    Occasional
    Impersonal
    Short-term
    Long- term
    Consistent
    Intimate
    Loyal
  • 8. 6
    Can Social Media go Wrong?
  • 9. Home Depot - Back in 2001
    7
  • 10. Home Depot - Today
    8
  • 11. Comcast
    9
  • 12. Comcast - Viral Nature of Social Media
    10
  • 13. Comcast Cares
    11
  • 14. Dove Onslaught(er) : Green Peace Campaign
    12
    1
    2
    3
  • 15. Nestle : Green Peace Campaign
    13
    Greenpeace Website
    Blog and Youtube
  • 16. Nestle : Response
    14
    Nestle response on Facebook
    Official statement on the website
  • 17. Other Brands
    15
  • 18. 16
    How to Prepare your brandSocial Media Reputation Management Strategy
  • 19. Step 1: Secure your brand
    17
    • Grab your brand everywhere you can, regardless of whether or not you plan to use it
    • 20. Have you have control of your identity all over the Web.
    • 21. Have unified social media username to establish trust with other members (and potential press contacts) who may belong to multiple communities with you.
  • Step 2: Monitor Social media Sites 24X7
    18
  • 22. Step 3: Create Rules for Engagement
    19
    • Train your employees on the proper use of social media tools
    • 23. Define rules for employees engaging in social media – basic social media tenants like
    • 24. disclosing the company you work for
    • 25. not discussing confidential information
    • 26. refraining from disparaging the company,
    • 27. not “engaging in impolite dialogue” 
  • Step 4: Establish your Crisis Strategy
    20
    • Set up a team who would be able to manage crisis situation and are willing to work around the clock
    • 28. Assess the situation online by harnessing the tools that are available
    • 29. Track the sources of negative publicity constantly to monitor change
    • 30. Trend the volume of responses and the type of consumer reaction (neutral, positive, negative)
    • 31. Define your response and ensure consistency in communication – do not send out multiple, mixed messages
  • Step 5: Define your Social Media Response Strategy
    21
    • If consumers are silent on the situation – continue to monitor but don’t respond publically (Yet)
    • 32. If a response is demanded , wait for the initial hype and outrage has died out, then respond to those who are genuinely seeking an answer
    • 33. Listen and determine the type of response the consumers want – apology/ acknowledgement/ demand for change
    • 34. Do not respond to quickly
    • 35. Do not respond in a “corporate tone” i.e.. a press release on the website as the sole response mechanism
    Source: Social Media Damage Control, SharlynLauby
  • 36. Case Studies
    22
  • 37. Bank of America – Twitter (1/2)Strategy : Customer Support
    23
  • 38. Bank of America – Twitter (2/2)Tactical: Humanizing the Brand
    24
  • 39. Bank of America - Facebook
    25
    Low channel Penetration – focus on twitter
  • 40. Dell Hell Campaign
    26
    2800 comments
  • 41. Dell : Response
    27
    Vote for Products
    Share user experience
    Twitter Presence
    Facebook Presence
    Second Life
  • 42. Dell : Outcome
    28
    Direct2Dell Community
  • 43. Q & A
    29
  • 44. Quotes
    30
    “We had to accept that there were some unknowns. If you try to mitigate every piece of risk, you will be either inauthentic or fail.”
    - Chris Bruzzo, VP of Brand, Content and Online, Starbucks
    “If you are going to engage, you have to have a plan and make sure that resources are available. Because you can’t gracefully exit — once you’re in, you’re in. The days of walking away from a campaign are over — once we engage, we have to commit to it.”
    Denise Morrissey, Online Community Manager - Toyota
    “Less than 25 percent of online communities have more than 1,000 members, even though more than half of those businesses have spent more than $1 million on their community projects “
    - Ed Moran of Deloitte.
  • 45. 31
    Learn more about Regalix at:
    www.regalix.com
    Contact:
    Priscilla
    Business Manager
    Email: pselwine@regalix-inc.com