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Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
Dahlman esip july 2011
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Dahlman esip july 2011

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How Do We Understand Climate? …

How Do We Understand Climate?
LuAnne Dahlman, NOAA
ESIP Teacher Workshop at the ESIP Summer Meeting 2011 in Santa Fe NM

Published in: Technology
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  • NOTE: Each slide has notes in the notes field to help users understand and narrate the story.
  • Every year, at his family’s annual Fourth of July picnic in Minneapolis, Charlie noticed that the adults loved to talked about the weather. His aunts and uncles who were farmers, gardeners, and golfers seemed to always be talking about how warm or dry it was this year. They often told stories in which weather played a part, recounting how too much or too little rain or a series of storms had affected them. Sometimes, folks remembered things differently, and they argued about what the weather had been like for certain events.At the picnic in 1971, when he was 11 years old, it was perfectly clear to Charliehow he could settle such arguments:he decided to keep a logbook of the weather. He found that the local newspaper always reported the high and low temperatures and precipitation amounts, so he got a logbook and started recording that info every day.iStockPhotoby Silvia Jansen www.silviajansen-fotografie.de
  • For a while, he faithfully kept a log and filled it in every day, checking the figures in the local newspaper. But a string of sunny summer days made him forget his determination, and after a few weeks, he gave up.
  • The next year when 4th of July came around, family members asked Charlie about his plan to record the weather. He took a little ribbing about his plan to record the weather.Being a practical kid, he decided that he could at least record the weather one day of the year, and so he started a weather journal and wrote down the temperatures each year for the 4th of July at the annual picnic.iStockPhoto by iofoto: http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-6494249-family-walking-in-park.php
  • So at the annual picnic each year, along with food, fireworks, and people talking about the weather, Charlie kept track of the weather.Food photo:iStockPhoto by cathyclapper2: http://www.istockphoto.com/user_view.php?id=431643Fireworks photo by Peripitus http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Peripitus
  • By the time he was in his 20s, Charlie had developed a few other interests, but he still marked down the weather at the annual picnic in Minneapolis, iStockPhoto by Kevin Russ: http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-487056-couple-in-a-sunny-park.php
  • When Charliewas 30, he’d started his own family. At the annual picnic, he started noticing that his parents and grandparents were getting older. He was still paying attention to the weather. He’d been recording the weather on that date in that place for 20 years.iStockPhoto by iofoto: http://www.istockphoto.com/user_view.php?id=1645926
  • In 2000, when he was 40 years old, he celebrated the 30th entry into his weather logbook. Finally, he felt like he had a good understanding of the weather on July 4th. Checking over his 30 years of weather data, he felt like he could tell if the weather on July 4th of any year was warmer or cooler than “normal.”iStockPhoto by Yarinca: http://www.istockphoto.com/user_view.php?id=2675761
  • Weather.
  • His log book for temperature looked something like this. Data from National Climatic Data Center
  • Though the day had been quite cool some years and noticeably warm during other years, he decided to calculate the average minimum and maximum temperatures.Data from National Climatic Data Center
  • Considering his 30 years of records, the average (mean) low and high temperatures seemed to him a good way to represent the “normal” climate for July 4 in Minneapolis.Data from National Climatic Data Center
  • Weather is observed; climate is calculated or described from memory
  • He decided to put those two points on a graph, as indicators of “normal” climate for that day in that place over the previous 30 years. He knew that some individual years were outside of those two points, but these seemed to characterize the day pretty well.Data from National Climatic Data Center
  • He realized that by checking the weather records kept by the National Weather Service, he could find and plot the range of “normal” temperatures for every day in July. The quantities he discovered by averaging the highs and lows are actually called climate normals. “Normal” in this case does NOT mean the most frequent or the expected temperature: it is simply the arithmetic mean for the past 30 years.This graph shows Climate Normals from 1971-2000 for Minneapolis. (A side note, only worth mentioning if someone notices that the normal high temperature is now shown as 86 rather than 84: Even after averaging thirty years of highs and lows for each date of the year, sequential dates can show some residual variability from weather. Therefore, published climate normal values have been mathematically smoothed so that normals track the expected seasonal pattern. Methodology for this statistical smoothing is described at the URL below).Minneapolis data from National Climatic Data Center: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/DLYNRMS/dnrm?coopid=215435Climatography of the United States NO. 84, 1971-2000Daily Normals of Temperature, Precipitation, and Heating and Cooling Degree Days
  • Indeed, he could find data and make a graph of the average high and low temperatures for the entire year for Minneapolis. He saw that the climate normals showed a predictable pattern of cold in the winter and warmer in the summer.Data from National Climatic Data Center
  • Another version of the same graph. The green shading is the normal envelope.http://climateexplorer.multigraph.org
  • http://climateexplorer.multigraph.orgWeather is highly variable. Some portionsof 2010 were warmer than normal while others were cooler than normal.Does one year of weather tell us anything about climate change? Simple visual inspection shows that more observed temperatures were above normal than below normal, but this yearly record is only 1/30th of a full climate series.
  • http://climateexplorer.multigraph.orgEvery year’s weather is different.
  • http://climateexplorer.multigraph.org
  • As of February 2011, the Climate Explorer Multigraph site is still considered a proof of concept site, but it offers a rich resource for exploring weather and climate.If you have Internet access available, click the URL at the bottom of the slide (in slide show mode) to open a browser and access the climate explorer site.
  • So the green envelope represents 30 years of weather, with heat waves, cold spells and normal weather all averaged together. The term climate change implies that the shape and/or magnitude of this curve is changing. Every ten years, the National Climatic Data Center computes new thirty-year climate normals for selected temperature and precipitation elements for a large number of U.S. climate and weather stations.NOAA's official climate normals were last produced for the 1971-2000 period, but the development of the 1981-2010 climate normals is already well underway. The final set of climate normals will be available toward the end of calendar year 2011
  • Single years of weather don’t tell us if climate is changing. To detect any change in climate, long-term climate records must be compared. This image shows the change in average winter temperature at locations across the conterminous U.S. from 1961-1990 to 1971-2000. A range of maps comparing 1971-2000 averages to 1961-1990 averages is available from the National Climatic Data Center at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/normals/assessments.htmlFor additional information, do an Internet search for 1981-2010 climate normals.
  • So the green envelope represents 30 years of weather, with heat waves, cold spells and normal weather all averaged together. The term climate change implies that the shape and/or magnitude of this curve is changing. Every ten years, NCDC computes new thirty-year climate normals for selected temperature and precipitation elements for a large number of U.S. climate and weather stations.NOAA's official climate normals were last produced for the 1971-2000 period, but the development of the 1981-2010 climate normals is already well underway. The final set of climate normals will be available toward the end of calendar year 2011
  • Transcript

    • 1. Comparing Climate and WeatherA Model U.S. Climate Reference Network Station
      ESIP Federation Summer Meeting, July 12, 2011
      LuAnn Dahlman
      NOAA Climate Program Office
    • 2. 1971 — Annual 4th of July Picnic — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 3. July
      4
      5
      2
      3
      4
      5
      1
      Hi: 82
      Lo: 61
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 84
      Lo: 66
      Pcp: 0
      9
      12
      11
      6
      7
      10
      8
      9
      6
      8
      10
      11
      12
      7
      Hi: 74
      Lo: 44
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 72
      Lo: 45
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 86
      Lo: 66
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 82
      Lo: 61
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 74
      Lo: 36
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 64
      Lo: 58
      Pcp: 0.09”
      Hi: 62
      Lo: 58
      Pcp: 0.61”
      15
      14
      17
      16
      13
      18
      19
      16
      17
      18
      19
      14
      15
      13
      Hi: 84
      Lo: 68
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 81
      Lo: 66
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 86
      Lo: 64
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 85
      Lo: 68
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 85
      Lo: 66
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 82
      Lo: 61
      Pcp: 0
      Hi: 82
      Lo: 61
      Pcp: 0
      20
      21
      22
      23
      24
      25
      26
      28
      29
      30
      31
      27
    • 4. 1972 — 4th of July Picnic — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 5.
    • 6. 1980 — 4th of July Picnic — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 7. 1990 — Annual 4th of July Picnic — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 8. 2000 — Annual 4th of July Picnic — Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • 9. What has Charlie been measuring for 30 years?
      Climate
      Climate and Weather
      Weather
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13. What is Charlie calculating?
      Climate
      Climate and Weather
      Weather
    • 14. (1971-2000)
    • 15.
    • 16.
    • 17. Climate normals for Minneapolis, 1971 - 2000
    • 18. Climate normals for Minneapolis, 1971 - 2000
      Compared to 2010 weather
    • 19. Climate normals for Minneapolis, 1971 - 2000
      Compared to 2009 weather
    • 20. Climate normals for Minneapolis, 1971 - 2000
      Compared to 2008 weather
    • 21. Multigraph Climate Explorer
      http://climateexplorer.multigraph.org
    • 22. Climate normals for Minneapolis, 1971 - 2000
      Historically, three consecutive decades of weather observations have been used to describe climate
    • 23. www.climate.gov
    • 24. Now anticipating release of 30-year Climate Normals for 1981 – 2010
      For Minneapolis,
      January minimums have increased by almost 3°F
      July maximums have decreased by about 0.5°F
    • 25. Weatheris what’s happening outside your window Atmospheric conditions that you can see, feel, or measure are weather.
    • 26. Temperature Statistics
      Climate can be described by words or numbers, but you cannot touch it
      Temperature Statistics
      Dynamic normals based on fewer than 30 years are also being used to make comparisons
    • 27. Temperature Statistics
      And though climate is often characterized by temperature alone…
      Temperature Statistics
    • 28. Climate is really a multi-faceted concept
    • 29. Climate? or Weather?
      Decide if each of the following phrases describes climate or weather.
    • 30. Climate? or Weather?
      Tells us what kind of clothes to wear
    • 31. Climate? or Weather
      Tells us what kind of clothes to wear
    • 32. Climate? or Weather?
      Tells us what kind of clothes to buy
    • 33. Climate? or Weather?
      Tells us what kind of clothes to buy
    • 34. Climate? or Weather?
      The picture that comes to your mind when you think of a faraway place
    • 35. Climate? or Weather?
      The picture that comes to your mind when you think of a faraway place
    • 36. Climate? or Weather?
      California usually has a winter storm during the last week of December
    • 37. Climate? or Weather?
      California usually has a winter storm during the last week of December
    • 38. How reliable do you think our weather records are for characterizing climate?
      A-Not reliable
      B-Somewhat reliable
      C-Very reliable
      D-Extremely reliable
    • 39. U.S. Climate Reference Network Station
    • 40.
    • 41.
    • 42. A quick look at the data:
      US Climate Reference Network Home page
      http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/crn/
    • 43. How reliable do you think US Climate Reference Network records are for characterizing climate?
      1-Not reliable
      2-Somewhat reliable
      3-Very reliable
      4-Extremely reliable
    • 44. NOAA also supports networks of instruments on buoys. These gather data from the depths of the ocean and at its surface
    • 45. Human efforts facilitate and complement automated data collection
    • 46. We launch weather balloons to learn about conditions in the lower atmosphere
    • 47. Balloons and rockets carry data-gathering instruments into the upperatmosphere
    • 48. and instruments on satellites monitor Earth’s status from orbit
    • 49. From the bottom of the ocean to the top of the atmosphere, we monitor Earth’s climate system
    • 50. Presentation prepared by
      LuAnn Dahlman, NOAA Climate Program Office
      luann.dahlman@noaa.gov
      Educators are welcome to share this electronic file.

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