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Project Proposal for Oxfam's Shelter and NFI humanitarian response in Jacmel, Haiti.

Project Proposal for Oxfam's Shelter and NFI humanitarian response in Jacmel, Haiti.

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  • 1. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Shelter and Non-Food Items Jacmel Proposal January 17th 2010 Submitted to: CIDA/IHA Submitted by:Oxfam Canada Contacts: Jacmel, Haiti: Florence Lévesque, National Director Telephone: 011-647 805 9493 Florence.Lev@oxfamcanada.org Toronto, Canada: TressanaHassanally, Director Reidun Squires, Team Leader – Africa Rebecca Sivel, Team Leader – Latin America and Caribbean Emergency Relief and Disaster Mitigation &International & Canadian Programs Tel: 647 801 2293 tresanna.h@gmail.com rebecca_sivel@hotmail.com reidun.squires@gmail.com
  • 2. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 2 Table of Contents List of Abbreviations or Acronyms ………………...…………………………………………………………………3 Map of Country …………………………………………………………….………………………………………….4 1. Project Proposal Summary Sheet …………………………………………………………………….……..........5 2. Project Overview …………………………………………………………………………………….…………...5 2.1 Background ………………………………………………………………………………………..............5 2.2 Project Rationale …………………………………………………………………………………………..6 2.3 Oxfam Canada Capacity …………………………………………………………………………………..6 3. Project Description ……………………………………………………………………………………………….7 3.1 Purpose and Expected Results …………………………………………………………………………….7 3.2 Beneficiaries ……………………………………………………………………………………………….7 3.3 Planned Activities …………………………………………………………………………………………7 3.3.1 Activity 1000 …………………………………………………………………………………...……..7 3.3.2 Activity 2000 ………………………………………………………………………………………….8 3.3.3 Activity 3000 ………………………………………………………………………………………….9 3.4 Assumptions and Risk Mitigation Strategy ………………………………………………………...........10 3.4.1 Assumptions ………………………………………………………………………………………….10 3.4.2 Risks and Risk Mitigation Strategies ………………………………………………………………...10 3.4.3 Security Management Strategy ………………………………………………………………………10 3.5 Project Management ……………………………………………………………………………………..11 3.6 Public Engagements and Benefits to Canada …………………………………………………………….11 4. Cross-Cutting Themes and Principles …………………………………………………………………………..12 4.1 Gender …………………………………………………………………………………………………...12 4.2 Participation of Beneficiaries ……………………………………………………………………………12 4.3 Local Delivery Partnerships and Capacity Building …………………………………………………….13 4.4 Convergence and Coordination ………………………………………………………………………….13 4.5 Sustainability ………………………………………………………………………………………….…14 4.6 Environment ……………………………………………………………………………………………..14 5. Monitoring and Reporting ………………………………………………………………………………………14 5.1 Performance Measurement Plan …………………………………………………………………………14 6. Financial Information ……………………………………………………………………………………….…..15 6.1 Projected Expenditures …………………………………………………………………………………..15 6.2 Sources of Income ………………………………………………………………………………………..15 Appendix I – Performance Framework ……………………………………………………………………………...16 Appendix II – Risk Mitigation Strategies Chart ……………………………………………………………………..17 Appendix III – Performance Measurement Plan …………………………………………………………….………17 List of Sources ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….19
  • 3. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 3 List of Abbreviations/Acronyms ACF: Action Against Hunger / Action Contre la Faim CARE: Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere ERF: Emergency Response Fund HDI: Human Development Index HDR: Human Development Report HR: Human Resources IDP: Internally displaced person IFRC: The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies NFI/s: Non-food item/s NGO: Non-government organization OCHA: Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs PLAN: International organization working for the rights of children PTSD: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder R&R: Rest and Relaxation UN: United Nations UNHCR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees WASH: Water Sanitation and Hygiene
  • 4. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 4 Map of Haiti Focus Area: Jacmel
  • 5. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 5 1. Project Proposal Summary Sheet Project Title Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Type of Crisis Natural Disaster – Earthquake Country and Specific Location Jacmel, Haiti Caribbean Project Dates Date of submission January 19th , 2010 Expected start-up January 26th , 2010 Expected completion July 26th , 2010 Agency Details Name Oxfam Canada Contact officer Florence Lévesque Telephone/fax/e-mail 011 – 647 – 805 – 9493 Florence.Lev@oxfamcanada.org Budget ($CAD) Total budget CAD $ 1, 985, 550.00 Funds from CIDA CAD $ 1, 960, 550.00 Funds from other sources CAD $ 25,00.00 (Oxfam) Expected contribution to CIDA’s IHA program - list most relevant outcome(s)  Improved or maintained health  Improved physical security  Improved or maintained household and community livelihoods Expected contribution to CIDA’s IHA program - list most relevant output(s)  Improved physical security  Improved or maintained household and community livelihood  Access to shelter and household items improved  Services to reduce physical risks  Improved interagency coordination Number and description of expected male and female beneficiaries: 300, 000 IDP living in Jacmel’s 10 IDP camps Narrative summary of the project and planned activities: Oxfam will undergo a larger rapid needs assessment (quick assessment completed in Port-au-Prince)in Jacmel to assess the demographics’ requirements for shelter and NFIs. A distribution system will be arranged in coordination with other sectors methodology. Temporary shelter kits will be distributed to the residents of the unplanned IDP camps. When IDPs are settled into their temporary homes, Oxfamwill distribute significant NFI kits, including clothing, bedding, cooking utensils, hygiene products and footwear. Oxfam will conduct regular community consultations to monitor the provision of both shelter and NFIs in order to maintain their usefulness. 2. Project Overview 2.1. Background Haiti is a fragile state. Poverty, political instability, environmental degradation, violence and instability have taken its toll with Haiti ranking 149th of the 182 nations in the 2009 UN HDI, the lowest ranking nation in the Western Hemisphere. A host of factors, natural and man-made, have made Haiti
  • 6. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 6 vulnerable to natural disasters, including climate change, deforestation, topography and poverty. The 2000s have not been kind to Haiti; 18,000 Haitians lost their lives to cyclones and floods between 2001- 2007, while a further 132,000 lost their homes. In 2008 alone 3 hurricanes and a tropical storm hit the country, affecting 8 of 10 Haitian departments (provinces), leaving 800,000 people in need of assistance and contributing the loss of homes, crops, infrastructure and livelihoods. Then, on January 12, 2010 at 4:53 p.m. Haiti was hit by a 7.0 magnitude earthquake, with the epicenter in the town of Leogane, about 25 kilometres away from the capital city, Port-au-Prince. The initial shaking lasted 15 seconds and was followed by eight aftershocks in the two hours after the earthquake, with magnitudes varying from 4.3 to 5.9. The first 9 hours after the earthquake saw 32 aftershocks, registering 4.2 or higher in scale. Over 220,000 people were killed immediately, 300,000 were left injured and more than an estimated 3.5 million were affected. Poor construction standards resulted in houses, schools and large buildings collapsing, trapping survivors and victims’ alike. Of Haiti’s 10 million people, 1.5 million were left homeless, living in unplanned IDP camps. Furthering the devastation was the incapacitation of the local government, both municipal and national, the UN and NGOs. The loss of personnel, family members and headquarters impacted the ability of the government and humanitarian organizations to respond quickly. The earthquake further weakens Haiti’s institutions and increases the risk of social unrest. Immediate action by the international community is needed to address the needs of Haitians affected by this natural disaster. 2.2. Project Rationale Over 1.7 million Haitians have made makeshift camps their home since the earthquake on January 10th . The earthquake destroyed 105,000 homes and left 208,000 damaged around the country. Jacmel, in the Sud-Est department, has been particularly devastated. The majority of homes in Jacmel were cement structures or dilapidated colonial homes. Jacmel Mayor, Zenny Edwin, said 70% of homes in his city have been damaged and a yet unknown number collapsed. Many of the structures that could be used to home the newly homeless are on the verge of collapse themselves, including city hall, a local orphanage and schools. Residents have gravitated and converted into 10 unplanned camps around the city, reaching 300,000 IDPs. Media reports depict the urgent need of survivors in Jacmel living in tents, which are only used for sleep. Survivors live in the streets, including bathing, brushing their teeth, doing laundry and cooking. Dead bodies decay in the collapsed buildings, including a school full of children. Jacmel also saw a mini-tsunami following the earthquake, with the ocean receding four times. Prior to the earthquake, Jacmel also faced an economic downturn due to an epidemic that wiped out the pig stock, a pest infestation that infected the cabbage crops and drought. The need for shelter is critical to survival after a disaster. Shelter provides protection by offering a place secure from outside dangers, including climate. It is also critical to promoting resistance to ill health and disease, not to mention the emotional well-being that comes with sustained family and community life that enables survivors to recover. NFIs like clothing, blankets and bedding meet the most fundamental of human needs for shelter to maintain health, privacy, and dignity. The Jacmel Football Ground and the town square offer appropriate space to temporarily house a large number of displaced community members. As Jacmel is a port city and home to a regional airport (though currently inaccessible); securing a supply chain to acquire goods should be easier than other areas of Haiti. 2.3. Oxfam’s Capacity Oxfam has a 50-year history of responding to disasters and providing aid to the most vulnerable. We are recognized as a leader in disaster response, ensuring those affected have access to shelter, basic necessities, food, water and sanitation facilities and education. Oxfam is committed to accountability and transparency in our disaster response. Through our internal policies and adherence to external codes of conduct and standards we are committed to being accountable to our stakeholders. Oxfam has been in Haiti for 30 years and already have an existing staff on the ground, including 300 national staff. The Oxfam Rapid Response Team has been deployed to Haiti to respond to the crisis. Due to Oxfam’s long history in Haiti, we were on the ground to respond to the natural disasters that have
  • 7. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 7 continually hit this country, including responding the substantial number of hurricanes and storms in 2008. In 2005, Oxfam created the ERF that allows our team to respond to emergency situations in a timely manner. To date, the ERF has responded to 25 emergencies around the world. While water and sanitation is our specialty, Oxfam has agreed to be the lead for emergency shelter in the Jacmel IDP camps. We have a long history and experience working providing shelter and NFIs in emergency situations, including during the Nepal floods and the Hurricane Stan in Guatemala. 3. Project Description 3.1 Purpose and Expected Results (refer to Annex I) The purpose of this project is to respond to the immediate need for shelter, clothing, bedding and other NFIs amongst the IDP community in the city of Jacmel. After completing an assessment of the area, temporary shelters will be distributed to the residents of the unplanned camps and constructed. When IDPs are settled into their temporary homes, we will distribute significant NFIs, including clothing, bedding, cooking utensils and other much needed items. Through the initial rapid needs assessment, once our team arrives on the ground, the beneficiaries will play a significant role in planning the camp and indicating which items are the most needed. This will allow us to identify the most vulnerable members of the community and collect data to form a baseline study by which all further monitoring and evaluating will be measured. Our assessment will identify solutions available in the immediate area, including food or building materials available. The shelters will be constructed using the information gathered during the assessment stage. By giving the beneficiaries ownership of the settlement process from the get-go, we hope to improve both their mental and physical security. After the assessment, we will distribute shelter and NFI kits to those at the camps. Through the building of shelter, the beneficiaries will see their health and protection situation improved. By limiting their exposure to the elements in an enclosed structure, community members will be secure and better able to move onto the recovery stage, including moving out of the temporary households. The NFI kits are essential to helping those affected by disasters regain a level of normalcy. Affected populations will use the kits to meet personal hygiene needs, provide comfort and build or repair their temporary shelters. The acquisition of NFIs is essential to the improvement of the physical and mental health of the IDPs. 3.2 Beneficiaries The beneficiaries of this project will be the 300,000 men, women and children of Jacmel and the surrounding regions, who have lost their homes and now reside in the one of the ten makeshift camps that has sprung up around the city. The majority of those who lost their homes were amongst the poorest in the community and resided in the urban area around the town. Through Oxfam’s assessment we will identify the vulnerable members in the community and ensure that their shelter and NFI needs are met. Vulnerable members of the community, including the disabled, orphans, single women and migrant workers, will be sure to be included. 3.3 Planned Activities 3.3.1 Activity 1000 – Conducting a Rapid Needs Assessment of 300,000 affected populations merging towards 10 IDP camps in Jacmel Activity 1000 – Rapid Needs Assessment Expected Output #1 – Understand the needs of the population in order to provide effective relief
  • 8. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 8 3.3.2 Activity 2000 - Providing Temporary Emergency Shelters, tools and repair materials (adequate covered living space) for 300,000 individuals living in 10 IDP camps located in Jacmel Narrative Description & Strategy - Oxfam will gain information and coordinate with clusters and other NGOs to ensure that aid offered is efficient and appropriate in order to ensure the best possible outcomes. Sub-activities 1100- Conduct needs assessment with the use of Sphere Shelter, settlement and NFI assessment checklist 1200 - Conduct and attend community consultations 1300 - Create implementation plan based on results 1400 - Attend NGO coordination meeting to coordinate and create a cohesive distribution plan 1500 - Coordinate with NGOs responsible for camp management to ensure that space allocated for shelter meet the sphere standards and that the land is ready for construction Expected Issues, Risks and Considerations Difficulties coordinating with other NGOs Beneficiaries demanding an immediate response therefore they will be less inclined to cooperate Ensure that all members of the community are represented, including the most vulnerable Communications specialist to talk with affected population about the importance of a needs assessment Key Inputs Required Staff resources including communication specialists Other NGOs and community leaders and members coordination and participation Activity 2000 – Providing Temporary Emergency Shelter for 300,000 displaced individuals. Expected Output #1 – Improved access to temporary emergency shelters to accommodate 300,000 displaced individuals in 10 IDP camps through effective distribution of shelter kits. Narrative Description & Strategy - Oxfam will provide and construct the shelters for the 10 IDP camps in Jacmel by providing the materials necessary to construct the temporary shelters with some assistance from Oxfam staff. Sub-activities 2100 - Procure materials for tents (plastic sheeting meeting the specifications defined by UNHCR, rope, tools, fixings and supporting materials such as timber poles or alternative framing elements) through established supply chain lines – Include locally sourced materials that are climate appropriate, familiar to the population and that can be reused for future long term housing solutions 2200 - Ship materials by plane to Haiti (Materials that could not be procured locally) 2300 - Assemble shelter kits 2400 – Distributing of shelter kits/instruction pamphlets to 10 IDP Camps 2500 – Agree upon establishment standards and guidelines in order to ensure that safety requirements are met
  • 9. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 9 3.3.3 Activity 3000 - Provide NFIs necessary for survival including clothing, bedding, cooking and eating utensils, hygiene products and footwear. Activity 3000 – Provide NFIs necessary for the survival of the 300,000 individuals living within the IDP camps Expected Output #1 – Improved, equitable access to NFIs to facilitate survival Narrative Description & Strategy - Oxfam will procure and distribute clothing, bedding and cooking and eating utensils to promote survival and replace items that have been lost. Sub-activities 3100 – Local procurement of NFIs that are culturally, gender and climate appropriate 3200 - Ship NFIs by plain to Haiti (Materials that could not be procured locally) 3300 – Warehousing of incoming goods 3400 – Creation of separate relief packages for women, men and children 3600 – Transportation of relief packages from warehouse to IDP camps 3700 - Distribution of goods Expected Issues, Risks and Considerations There could be conflict over limited resources Most NFIs will have to be imported do to the devastating condition of the country Conflict and chaos could erupt during distribution Key Inputs Required Warehouse structure Oxfam staff procuring and receiving goods, creating and distributing relief packages Transportation for distributionof relief packages NFI Kits: Clothing, bedding, food and cooking utensils, hygiene products and footwear 2600 - Train beneficiaries on appropriate assembly 2700 - IDPs build shelters with the help of Oxfam team 2800 - Conduct regular maintenance and risk and vulnerability assessment 2900 - Acquire warehouse space to house replacement shelter materials Expected Issues, Risks and Considerations Most input materials will have to be imported from other countries due to the destruction of most of Haiti’s resources and may be held up at points of entry. Materials are not meant for long-term use and may need some repair if used for longer than expected. IDP do not use their materials in an effective manner (sell materials in market place for cash value) Key Inputs Required Local construction capacities and materials 120-125 local and expat staff responsible for the procurement of materials, supervision and construction of shelters Reusable Shelter Materials: plastic sheeting/tarp, rope and framing materials Tools for building, maintenance and repair Warehouse to house temporary shelter replacement materials
  • 10. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 10 3.4 Assumptions and Risk Mitigation Strategy 3.4.1 Assumptions: The following four assumptions about the project’s external environment are necessary for the success of the project. The first assumption is that after the initial earthquake, Haiti will experience relatively good weather and be insulated from further earthquakes or aftershocks. This would allow for efficient shelter construction. The second assumption is that the layout of the IDP camps will be organized in a way that allows enough space for all the shelters as well as two meters between the shelters as defined by the sphere standards. Furthermore, the IDP camp sites should be cleared of debris and ready to be constructed on by the time Oxfam is ready to implement its programing. The third assumption is that the other partnering organizations will be successful in creating a healthier environment for the IDPs and they will have equal access to security, food, water and sanitation. The fourth assumption is that the IDPs will remain relatively calm in order to avoid chaotic and dangerous situations within the camps. 3.4.2 Risks and Risk Mitigation Strategies (refer to Annex II): Due to the insecure nature of this response there are several risks identified below that could have an impact on the project however these risks can be mitigated to reduce their impact on the success of the project. The first risk identified is that violent conflict and chaos could erupt during the distribution of goods due to high tensions and frustration among the IDPs. This risk can be mitigated by planning ahead to make sure that the process of distribution is organized, orderly and cohesive with the other distribution processes occurring at the same time in the same region. Furthermore it is important to create clear designated areas in which distribution will take place and ensure that the distribution is fair and equal for everyone. The second risk is that earthquake aftershocks or other adverse weather conditions continuously occur. In order to mitigate this risk, Oxfam will ensure that all the materials necessary to build a sturdy shelter are provided and that shelters are properly constructed. They will also be using plastic sheeting as the living space cover to avoid having heavy materials fall onto dwellers. The third risk is that Oxfam will have an inability to acquire and distribute appropriate goods in a timely manner due to a lack of resources or accessibility. In order to mitigate this risk, Oxfam will ensure that it has the capacity in the planning stages of the project. Furthermore, a quick assessment of the possibility of the kits being acquired locally will be conducted. If the local capacity is limited, goods will need to be shipped by air which means that Haiti must be made accessible for plains. The fourth risk is that the IDP camp locations are not big enough or appropriate for the amount of shelters required. To mitigate this risk, it is important to coordinate with camp management to ensure that a proper zoning of the campsites has taken place prior to starting the establishment of shelters. Furthermore, it is possible to relocate individuals if there is more room in other camps and it might be necessary to be creative with the organization and layout of the shelters. The last risk is of goods and materials being stolen at the warehouse or during transportation. This risk will be mitigated by securing the warehouse with the help of fencing, locks and guards. Oxfam will also implement security measures during transport including convoys. 3.4.3 Security Management Strategy: Due to the vulnerable nature and context of this project, there are several possible risks targeting project personnel. These risks include risk of conflict and violent assault during distribution, unsafe infrastructure, armed robbery, the potential risk of another natural disaster (especially flooding and earthquakes), disease outbreak and emotional distress or PTSD. Due to the high stress levels and desperation among IDPs, it is common for conflict to erupt during the distribution process. In order to avoid attacks on staff members it is important to plan the distribution process in advance in order to create an organized and systematic process of distribution. Specific and consistent locations should be allocated to the distribution process in order to maintain an organized and safe environment. Furthermore the staff will be trained extensively in crowed control and will also create a detailed evacuation plan if the crowd gets out of control. It is also important for staff to
  • 11. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 11 foster and maintain friendly and trusting relationships with the IDPs in order to promote trust and respect between staff and recipients of aid. Since the staff will be working in a region of compromised infrastructure all buildings used by staff will be inspected to ensure its security. If necessary temporary tents will be set up as work spaces. It is also important for the staff to construct their own shelters in order to ensure their safety. In addition to this, it is important that the staff in charge of shelter construction be highly trained in order to create shelters and working spaces that can withstand adverse weather conditions should follow up natural disasters occur. To insure safety of staff, in the event of a second natural disaster, it is important to build secure temporary shelter and work spaces for the staff with lightweight materials. NGOs are most vulnerable to armed robbery when transporting goods as well as warehousing them. It is important to implement safety measures at the warehouse such as lighting, fencing, guards and locks in order to discourage robbery attempts. In the event of an armed robbery staff members will be trained to put their own safety above all else. Furthermore, transportation will take place in the form of a convoy with the help of guards is necessary. Due to the desperate and unsanitary nature of the IDP camps and the lack of sanitation, staff members working within the camps, in direct contact with the IDPs, run a high risk of being exposed to infectious diseases. In order to mitigate this risk it is crucial that the staff members be appropriately vaccinated before departure. Furthermore, staff members will be instructed on preventative techniques as well as supplied with items to prevent the spread of disease such as masks and gloves if applicable. Furthermore the staff will have access to clean water and sanitation facilities with the help of partnering NGOs working in the same area. Emotional distress or PTSD is common among aid workers, especially in disaster relief. In order to mitigate this risk, staff will be briefed before entering the field and debriefed once they leave the field. Furthermore, staff will be closely monitored by the project coordinator and HR to ensure that they are working reasonable hours and getting sufficient rest. The Project coordinator and HR will also be looking for signs of burn outs as well as ensuring that staff is taking mandatory R&R vacation every six weeks. 3.5 Project Management The response manager for this humanitarian relief project is Florence Lévesque. She will be overseeing the entire project from Jacmel. Furthermore, this project will include a program coordinator who will report directly to the response manager and will be responsible for overseeing the programs team and activities. The programs team will include M&E accountability and information personnel who will be responsible for ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the IDP camps as well as keeping an open line of communication with beneficiaries. An operations team led by a field and sector operator will also be required. This team is responsible for the acquisition, transportation and distribution of goods. The operators will report directly to the program coordinator. Reporting to the field and sector operator will be the technical team. This team will include a technician responsible for the NFIs and a technician responsible for shelters. They will ensure the proper and safe use of shelter and NFI materials as well as access. Lastly the project will include support and liaison staff which will include human resources, finance, ITC, security and communications personnel. The liaison staff will be available to contribute within all of the departments and will be directly reporting to the support and liaison manager who will report to the response manager. Each department will be given a document listing their responsibilities within the project and the departments’ manager will be held accountable for their teams’ performance. 3.6 Public Engagement and Benefits to Canada Oxfam is engaging the Canadian public in understanding the background and specifics of this humanitarian intervention through media coverage as well as viral and televised appeal videos explaining the dire situation and projects being implemented in Haiti. Oxfam will be relying on Canada’s close proximity and familiarity with the region, since it is a popular vacation destination for North Americans, in order to make an emotional plea for donations. Furthermore, Oxfam will be working closely with Canada’s Haitian Governor General, Michaëlle Jean to further engage the public. By implementing this
  • 12. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 12 project, Canada will improve its relations with Haiti as well as create a positive image within the international community. 4. Cross-Cutting Themes and Principles 4.1 Gender In order to build upon a gender-sensitive framework, the needs of most vulnerable people must be incorporated into overall plans. Oxfam will have to conduct a more complete rapid needs assessment in Jacmel and hold community consultations to better understand the demographics’ needs towards shelter and NFIs. Consultations will ensure the participation of vulnerable groups (women, girls, disabled, elderly and people who face discrimination) in order to determine adequate types of shelter, access to facilities and the types of NFIs that are essential in recovering their livelihoods. With the information collected from the latest needs assessment,Oxfam will ensure that distribution systems begin with registered female-headed households and Save the Children’s assistance to orphans, and then mixed families and finally singles. Oxfam will provide internal divisions within the temporary shelters to allow for adequate space provision and privacy and avoid over-crowding. Oxfam will ensure single family dwellings, especially held by women are located closer to water sources and accommodations held by single females are not located on the outskirts of the camps. These precautionary measures secure people from potential threats and risky environments due to isolation. Oxfam will undertake regular risk and vulnerability assessments to accurately and continually define the level of risk for the affected population. This practice will discourage gender based violence and recognize the different roles people play in caring for families and dependants. When identifying the types of NFI kits going to whom, Oxfam will pay special attention towards the specifics in either kits that are relevant to both women and men in terms of type of skills and work that they perform. Special attention will also be given to the appropriateness of cultural practices in terms of clothing and NFI kits given to pregnant and lactating women (along with other marginalized individuals at risk). Oxfam has recruited a team with a balance of women and men (along with ethnicity, age, social background) in order to provide diverse assistance to the affected population. 4.2 Participation of Beneficiaries Oxfam’s key stakeholders are the 10 IDP camps in Jacmel Haiti that hold 300, 000 women, men, girls and boys affected by this earthquake. There are obvious groups that are marginalized, such as women, children, elderly and the sick, injured and stigmatized. Other particularly vulnerable people are the minorities of black/European/middle-eastern descent. This group of migrant workers faced issues before the earthquake and now may see an increase of discrimination due to the disaster. In order to optimize beneficiary response, all represented groups including the “less visible”, need to be incorporated into Oxfam’s response. Data collected during the needs assessment will be disaggregated by sex and age in order to ensure the shelter sector considers the diverse population in terms of all shelter and NFI needs. During all stages of this humanitarian response, Oxfam will involve community leaders, vulnerable groups and all representation of the affected population from the beginning to encourage two- way communication and the participation of beneficiaries. Active participation in disaster related context is the foundation for people’s right to life with dignity. Every effort to listen, consult and bring people towards action in the earliest stage will increase the quality of rehabilitation later on. The opinions of groups and individuals that spend more time in the household will be prioritized. This will allow beneficiaries to influence types of shelter, location (along with site management teams) and supply types they receive in order for a more targeted/relevant and effective response. Oxfam will promote participation by providing instruction sheets (for construction and maintenance of shelters and NFIs) that use uncomplicated language or large type face for the visually or hearing impaired. Oxfam will hold regular skills training to maximise opportunity for participation during the building of temporary shelters. Women will be encouraged as well in order to not be at particular risk in seeking assistance to build/fix their shelter. People that are less capable of physical tasks or have confined resources to participate will be encouraged towards tasks like site monitoring, provision of
  • 13. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 13 childcare and preparations of food (with collaboration of other NGO sectors). Feedback boxes will be set- up throughout the camp for beneficiaries to give feedback on the humanitarian response and strategies. As mentioned, a formal distribution system (with coordination from other sectors) will be set up and vulnerable households and individuals will not be omitted from participation. The appropriateness of NFI items will also contribute to the participation level of the affected population. The quantity and types of cooking materials will be advised by cultural practices and those who typically oversee the preparation of food. 4.3 Local Delivery Partnerships and Capacity Building Due to the massive amounts of damage caused by the earthquake, most locally established capacity and partnerships useful in the reconstruction of this context disappeared. Indigenous services and systems that already existed were almost all destroyed as 1.5 million people became homeless, 60% of administrative and government buildings and 60-80% of schools were destroyed. 19 million cubic meters of debris was left to be removed for reconstruction. Oxfam will still try to build any capacity of the population through its temporary shelter construction and NFI material strategies. During the rapid needs assessment, Oxfam will also do a rapid market analysis to investigate if any local organizations can provide assistance in the building of shelters or source the provision of familiar materials for NFI kits from any less affected local areas. Not much of a local economy exists post-earthquake, so cash and/or voucher systems could enable the population to manage the reconstruction of their own shelter and NFI items. This will be evaluated and ventured into as soon as possible. Overall, Oxfam will consult with willing participants living in the IDP’s for local skills and resources to be maximised in so as long as it doesn’t result in the negative effects of affected people, i.e. exposing women to sexual exploitation. Therefore any teams constructing/maintaining shelter will be mixed with both national and Oxfam peoples. Oxfam’s response will build upon existing coping strategies and encourage the building of increasing autonomy and self-reliance by those affected. Pazapa is a local organization working with disabled children that operated in Haiti before the earthquake. They will be investigated and possibly consulted to work with Oxfam in order to provide appropriate shelter and NFIs to children with disabilities. 4.4 Convergence and Coordination Oxfam recognizes and commits to several international principles and standards while implementing this humanitarian relief project. Oxfam commits directly to Sphere and also refers to UNHDR (standards for plastic sheeting) and Oxfam’s Handbook of Development and Relief. Concerning Sphere, the Humanitarian Charter, Protection Principles and Core Standards have all been addressed in this proposal. The specific minimum standards in Sphere for shelter and settlement that have been addressed are: Standard 1: strategic planning, Standard 3: covered living space and Standard 4: construction. Oxfam will also commit to specific minimum standards for NFIs; Standard 1: individual, general household and shelter support items, Standard 2: clothing and bedding, Standard 3: cooking and eating utensils, Standard 5: tools and fixings. The government of Haiti will be consulted as they are the primary bearer of responsibility for their citizens. Oxfam does not strive to set-up existing parallel structures, although at this point in time the destruction is so great that the government does require assistance. The UN/OCHA has the capacity to deal with humanitarian response on a global level, and their cluster meeting communication is important to incorporate into Oxfam’s plan. IFRC will be consulted for health services on the IDP’s. We will share resources like registration lists and distribution plans, in order to identifying the most vulnerable groups and coordinate response. The qualities of shelter from Oxfam will inevitably have an effect on the population’s health. PLAN will be consulted for food aid response; what kits from us will better suit their plan. ACF will be consulted for WASH services; where they will locate water sources, hygienic practices and latrines and how this will affect the types of shelter we will provide. Save the Children will be an important body to consult constantly for identifying the needs of children. Oxfam’s provision and types of shelter and NFI’s will benefit from the specialist advice of a group who know children best. CARE will be one of the biggest collaborative partners for Oxfam. They will be dealing with camp management, site planning, debris removal and drainage which affect our shelter provision
  • 14. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 14 (locations and types). CARE will also provide essential information in terms of distribution systems and identity cards for vouchers. Coordination with local authorities and community based groups are also important for their comprehension of Oxfam’s services, to optimise this intervention and prevent duplicated strategies. Some minimum standards that Oxfam will have trouble meeting for shelter are Standard 2: settlement planning and NFI Standard 4: stoves, fuel and lighting. Settlement planning is organized by CARE, therefore Oxfam is less removed from the process and outcomes of those decisions. There will be ongoing coordination in terms of settlement locations, drainage and decreasing vector and environmental risks. Stoves, fuel and lighting standards will not be met by Oxfam because we are not distributing this material. PLAN is responsible for food aid and will be organizing this provision of material and services; they will need to be coordinated with in terms of a cohesive response that works with our shelter/NFI standards. 4.5 Sustainability Oxfam has considered sustainable recovery and development by using appropriate technical design, building and maintenance procedures that will allow for the population to successfully survive in these IDP camps. Adequate amounts of ventilation in shelter spaces will lower the risk of disease transmission and be vector control measure. Initial shelter response will need to be maintained and upgraded over the time the affected population stays on the IDPs. New shelter material (plastic sheets) and kits will be made available including tools that can be used for a sustained period of time (even to start rebuilding their original homes). In terms of NFIs, the rapid needs assessment identifies the most appropriate kits for women, men and children, which allows for the most sustainable response regarding item use. Oxfam will make an assessment when kits need to be replenished, further planning ahead of time to make the project sustainable. When the initial 6 month period is over, Oxfam will transition into the recovery stage where original materials and NFIs will maintain their usefulness for future development. 4.6 Environment By taking information from the initial assessment and coordinating with site management, long- term adverse impacts on the environment due to shelter and NFIs will be addressed on an on-going basis. The material for shelters will initially be sourced from Oxfam’s stocked supplies in Canada. Material for shelter will try to be locally sourced at a later date which will minimise impact on the environment. The building techniques will also minimise adverse impacts on natural life as there is no major construction involved and no requirements for machinery. Other NGOs will be consulted in the future Oxfam discontinuation strategy; eventually when all shelters and, materials and waste need to be removed. Ensuring that there are proper plans in place to remove any waste left over will also minimise the effects on the natural environment. 5. Monitoring and Reporting 5.1 Performance Measurement Plan (refer to Annex III)
  • 15. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 15 6. Financial Information 6.1 Projected Expenditures Line Items Personnel Supplies (Shelter/NFI) Transportation & Travel Training (Material) Other Direct Costs (Warehouse) Capital Expenditures Field Administration Support Fee (15%) Canadian Administration Fee (7%) TOTAL $CAD 200,000.00 800,000.00 600,000.00 2500.00 15,000.00 10,000.00 244,125.00 113,925.00 ____________________ 1, 985, 550.00 6.2 Sources of Income Funded by CIDA/IHA Funded by Oxfam ERF TOTAL $CAD 1,960,550.00 25,000.00 ____________________ 1,985, 550.00
  • 16. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 16 AnnexI – PerformanceFramework Project Title: Project Title: Shelter/NFI – Jacmel Project Goal: Project Goal: Provide emergency shelter and non-food items to those living in IDP camps in Jacmel. Reach – 300,000 displaced people, in the city of Jacmel Resources – US $1, 985, 550.00 Planned Activities and Expected Results Over 6-month period commencing in January 2010 Activities Beneficiaries Outputs Outcomes Impact 1000 - Rapid Needs Assessments 2000 - Providing Temporary Emergency Shelter necessary for the survival of the 300,000 individuals living within the IDP camps 3000 - Provide NFIs necessary for the survival of the 300,000 individuals living within the IDP camps IDPs in Jacmel camps IDPs in Jacmel camps, with particular attention to vulnerable groups. IDPs in Jacmel camps. 1. Involvement of beneficiaries in improving access to shelter and essential items. 2. Improved temporary shelter. 3. IDPs supported with non-food items. Improved physical security. Improved physical security and Improved health. Improved or maintained health. Help meet the basic human needs of Haitians affected by the earthquake.
  • 17. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 17 Annex II - Risk Mitigation Strategies Chart Risk Factor Odds of Occurring Impact if Occurs Risk Mitigation Strategy 1. Violent conflict and chaos erupt during the distribution of goods Medium Medium - Plan ahead to make sure that the process of distribution is organized and orderly and cohesive with the other distribution processes occurring at the same time. - Create clear designated areas in which distribution will take place. - Ensure that the distribution is fair and equal for everyone. 2. Earthquake aftershocks or other adverse weather conditions High Medium - Ensure that all the materials necessary to build a sturdy shelter are provided and that shelters are properly constructed. - Use plastic sheeting to avoid having heavy materials fall onto residents. 3. Inability to acquire and distribute appropriate goods in a timely manner due to lack of resources or accessibility Low High - Ensure Oxfam and its partners have the capacity in the planning stages of the project - Quickly assess if the goods needed can be acquired locally, if not, ship products by air and insure that the plains will have access to the country 4. The IDP camp locations are not big enough for the amount of shelters required Medium Medium - Coordinate with Camp Management to ensure that zoning of the campsites has taken place prior establishing the shelters. - Relocate individuals if there is more room in other camps. - Be creative with the organization of the shelters. 5. Goods and materials being stolen at the warehouse or during transportation High Medium - Ensure security around the warehouse, including fencing, locks and guards. - Implement security measures during transport (including convoys). Annex III–Performance Measurement Plan Indicators Data Source Data Collection Method Responsibility Expected Outcome Details – All IDPs on 10 camps in Jacmel are benefitting from Oxfam emergency shelter and NFI assistance. Oxfam will use report information from UNHCR and OCHA. Oxfam would coordinate with UNHCR and OCHA to acquire statistical information on IDP in Jacmel. All staff will be involved including Oxfam Program, Operation, Support and Liaison Teams 1.Shelter of IDPs provided Number of shelter kits distributed Logistical team will create a distribution list that will be used to measure the number of kits distributed and ensure it corresponds with the list of beneficiaries gathered during the assessment. Oxfam Operation Team including Shelter and NFI Technicians
  • 18. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 18 2. NFIs of IDPs provided Number of NFI kits distributed Logistical team will create a distribution list that will be used to measure the number of kits distributed and ensure it corresponds with the list of beneficiaries gathered during the assessment. Expected Output #1 –The assessed shelter needs of the Jacmel disaster affected population has been met. There are an appropriate Number of structures constructed in the 10 camps. Logistical team will count the number of shelters constructed. Oxfam Operational and Program teams 1. All temporary shelter and settlement solutions are safe and adequate and will remain so until more durable solutions are achieved Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Oxfam team will conduct regular shelter inspections of all IDP dwellings Oxfam Operations team including Technicians (shelter/NFI), and Program Team including M&E personnel 2.Shelter and settlement solutions to meet the essential needs of all the disaster- affected population are agreed with the population themselves and relevant authorities in coordination with all responding agencies Rapid Needs Assessment and community consultations and feedback from IDP through feedback box Oxfam team will consult with community members, local government officials and partnering NGOs on a regular basis to qualitatively assess that IDP needs are being met. Feedback box will be regularly checked and strategies developed in consideration Oxfam Operations team including Technicians (shelter/NFI), Program Team including M&E personnel 3. Ensure that each affected household has adequate covered living space of 3.5 m2 Vulnerability and Risk Assessment Through regular inspections of dwellings, a maintained standard of space and coverage will be evaluated. Oxfam Operation team including Technicians for shelter/NFI. Expected Output #2 – The assessed NFI needs of the Jacmel disaster affected population have been met. Vulnerability and Risk Assessment and Community consultations. Oxfam team will consult with community members and partnering NGOs on a regular basis to qualitatively assess that IDP needs are being met. Oxfam Programs Team 1. All disaster affected people have a combination of blankets, bedding, clothing, hygiene products, cooking utensils, etc. Assessment and Community consultations and Feedback Box Oxfam team will consult with community members and partnering NGOs on a regular basis to qualitatively assess that NFI needs are being met. Feedback box will be regularly checked and strategies considered developed in consideration Oxfam Program Team, including M&E, Accountability and Information’s Management Personnel
  • 19. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 19 List of Sources (2011). The sphere handbook: Humanitarian charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response. (3rd ed.). United Kingdom: Practical Action Publishing. 2010 Haiti Earthquake.(n.d.).In Wikipedia. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Haiti_earthquake AFP (2010, January 20). In Haiti, the Jacmel cathedral clock stopped at 5:37 p.m. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://www.mysinchew.com/node/34251 Disasters Emergency Committee.(n.d.).Haiti Earthquake Facts and Figures. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://www.dec.org.uk/haiti-earthquake-facts-and-figures European Commission.(n.d.).Haiti before the earthquake. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://ec.europa.eu/echo/files/aid/countries/Haiti_paper_01102010.pdf Kinzie, Susan (2010, January 24). In Jacmel, Haiti, parties give way to aftershocks and rescue missions. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp- dyn/content/article/2010/01/23/AR2010012302632_2.html?sid=ST2010012303051 Leeder, Jessica. (2010, February 9). Welcome to Jacmel. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/welcome-to-jacmel/article4082789/ Risk Management Solutions. (2010, January 22). RMS FAQ: 2010 Haiti Earthquake and Caribbean Earthquake Risk. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from https://support.rms.com/publications/Haiti_Earthquake_FAQ.pdf Schwartz, Timothy. (2011, April 15). Economic Impact of Haiti Earthquake on Sudest Haiti (Jacmel) [Web log post]. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://open.salon.com/blog/timotuck/2011/04/15/economic_impact_of_haiti_earthquake_on_sudest_haiti _jacmel United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). (2009). Human Development Report 2009 Overcomingbarriers: Human mobility and development. Retrieved March 20, 2014, from http://hdr.undp.org/sites/default/files/reports/269/hdr_2009_en_complete.pdf
  • 20. Shelter and Non-Food Item Rapid Response Jacmel, Haiti Oxfam Canada January 17th 2010 20 Pazapa Center for Handicapped Children, Jacmel, Haiti. “Helping Haitian Children with Special Needs since 1987”. Retrieved March 23, 2014, from http://pazapa.org/ Minorities in focus. “Category Archives: Haitians. Retrieved March 23, 2014, from http://minorityrights.wordpress.com/category/haitians/