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NCGE August 3, 2013

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Climb the Common Core Ladder, presented at NCGE, Denver, CO on August 3, 2013.

Climb the Common Core Ladder, presented at NCGE, Denver, CO on August 3, 2013.

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  • Before we begin, let’s take a pre-workshop survey to determine where the majority of us fall on a continuum that measures our comfort level, understanding or knowledge about the Common Core State Standards for ELA. In a moment I will ask you to place a “mark” on the poster that relates to your comfort level.
  • At the one end is Surtsey, an island off Iceland, a fairly new island formed in 1964. (There have been subsequent islands formed, but it is believed that this island will not succumb to the threats of new islands, waves, wind, etc..
  • The next island on the continuum is Mont Saint-Michel (pronounced Mon San Michelle). Mont Saint-Michel is and island only during high tide. It wavers between being an island and not. If your comfort level is “here” then perhaps you have a good understanding of the basics and implications of the CCSS-ELA, but also unsure on how to apply to contents other than ELA.
  • The island of Hawaii, is larger than the last, but is also growing, just like your knowledge about the CCSS-ELA is also growing.
  • And the continuum’s other endpoint is Australia, the largest island in the world!
  • So where is your comfort level? Take a marker and draw a symbol or character under the name of the island that best represents where you fall on the continuum.
  • So what does the CCSS-ELA look like in a social studies classroom? Teachers should be guiding students to read increasingly complex text with specific questions. What should you be seeing? Students reading and discussing reading passages with specific questions to guide their understanding. AND you should see students writing!!!For example, let’s look at the Delaware Geography Standard Four, prioritized for seventh grade. This standard requires students to EXPLAIN the forces behind establishing territories.
  • From the National Geography Standards are very similar to the Delaware standards in this respect. For example in 8thGrade -  Territorial Divisions1. The types of boundaries used to define territorial division Cooperation2. Countries and organizations cooperate through treaties, laws, and agreements to manage resources, maintain the environment, and mediate disputes Conflict3. There are multiple sources of conflict resulting from the division of Earth's surface
  • The article we will use to demonstrate how well CCSS-ELA and Social Studies informational text are matched is “The World’s Most Exclusive Condominium”. Written by Frank Jacobs and for the New York Times online commentary on January 12, 2012.Think about what you think this article is about? Share.
  • We are going to read this article and as we do, we will work our way up the CCSS ladder AND obtaining a better understanding of conflict and cooperation in the world of geography.
  • Like many informational texts, sharing what you have read is difficult because of two things: you haven’t read enough to determine what the significant ideas are, so you are trying to hold onto detail in case they turn out to be important. And like a lot of upper-level informational texts, it conveys a lot of information very quickly and your brain has to sort them out into something coherent and as you retell you may find yourself restructuring the details. “There is an island on a river between France and Spain and you aren’t allowed to visit it. A treaty fixed the border between France and Spain in 1659, but it has been used as a meeting place.” …. Others may add that “It is less than an acre in size and used to exchange royal brides”.
  • Let’s look at Anchor Standard 2 , which asks readers to:determine central ideasand summarize text, linking key ideas and details. (This can be difficult if you didn’t do well with Standard 1, so go back and reread if you need to) The CCSS steers us away from the idea that there is one main idea, but several or central ideas. Hold yourself to the article, to what the article says and suggests. Stay true to the close analysis of the text.
  • As we continue to read, ASK YOURSELF – “Is the idea that I thought was central to this text turning out to still be central? Is the article forwarding other ideas more strongly?” READ to star #2
  • By now you should be able to tackle anchor standards 1, 2, and 3. Try to restate, locate ideas, and support the ideas with details. SELECT one central idea and support it with details from the article. (My example is that condominiums are geographically unique territories that have legal and economic implications. Pheasant Island has been “passed back and forth over 700 times”. And in order for one country to give up rights, it is referred back to the original legal document that made that happen.) How has the author developed these ideas in the text?
  • Continue reading….
  • Standard 4 is the first standard of the family of standards that deal with CRAFT and STRUCTUREStandard 4 specifically looks at word choice/vocabulary and tone. (my example is the use of words such as : terminus, eyot (or ait), which like condominium is unusual, “rarest of all border arrangements”.) (Important words: condominium, legal, shared, treaty)What about the tone of the article? How would you describe it? What support do you find for that? (footnotes show humor as the obscure, such as how property rights are defined from heaven to hell, but is no longer practical since the advent of the hot air balloon.)
  • This was done using the online program Wordle. The 30 most frequently used words are highlighted.“Wordles” can also be shared as a pre-reading strategy. For this article, it might be better used as a pre-reading in order to avoid the common understanding of a condominium to being a home/building.The CCSS-ELA requires a focus on Tier-Two or Academic vocabulary. In this case “Parties” and “Border” may be considered Tier Two words.
  • Reconsider the central ideas now that you’ve finished the article. What changes would you make? “Look at the text as if you were flying above it.” Instead of seeing fields divided by ribbons of roads, you see paragraphs. Think about meanings in those paragraphs, about the different sort of work that is being done in one part of the text, another, and another. ASK what work each part does. In our article the article starts with an oddity, then it isn’t until the fifth paragraph that the word condominium is even explained, which brings us back to the title. Then other examples and then implications or complications (conflicts or cooperation). The article ends taking into account how land issues/borders can be dealt with problem/solution.
  • Author’s point of view. He begins with a hook, “You are not allowed….” and continues to tell the story of how a ‘border enthusiast’ would be perplexed by the situation. He is a border enthusiast!!!! He wants you to become a border enthusiast by sharing oddities about borders. He also thinks condominiums are a good way to have countries be “cooperative”. NOTE that each time we tackle an anchor standard, we rely on previous conclusions or we amend those conclusions. To understand author’s point of view we look at language and structure and central ideas.
  • To tackle anchor standards 7-9 you need to read a text that is in some way related to the first text. You can compare messages or tone. You can also compare to a different media, like a video on enclaves of the United States. Regardless you will KNOW more about the topic.Now to answer essential questions:What are the advantages and disadvantages of condominiums?Why do conflicts occur when political and cultural boundaries are drawn? How are they resolved?
  • One way to address Standards 7-9 with this article is to have students review materials about other conflict/cooperation situations. Here are two videos from April 2013 about the territorial disagreement between China and Japan over the 5 uninhabited islands in the China Sea. Each is under two minutes.
  • Here is a link to a more recent article, about the dispute. Because it is about a video game it may connect to students. The article is written at a 13.3 Flesch-Kincaid level and includes the trailer (in Chinese!) for the video game. Click on the picture for a http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/07/26/chinese-army-designed-video-game-lets-players-fight-japan-for-the-diaoyu-islands/ link to the article.
  • Another approach to meeting standards 7-9 would be for students to research other island disputes. Again, it doesn’t matter what other media are used to meet these standards because content will be learned!
  • Standard 10 is the other rail of the ladder and should be addressed on an on-going basis so that students read increasingly complex text.This article has a Flesch-Kincaid rating of 10.8
  • Standard 10 is the other rail of the ladder and should be addressed on an on-going basis so that students read increasingly complex text.Flesch-Kincaid = 10.8Note this is a quantitative measure. Text Complexity is based on three considerations:QuantitativeQualitative And Reader and Task. Example using the Gettysburg Address:
  • There are three considerations when determining the level of text complexity. QuantitativeQualitative And Reader and Task. A lesson that incorporates reading, vocabulary, writing, and discuss of the Gettysburg Address would be appropriate for the grade 9-10 grade band even though the Quantitative Measure is 10.8 FK and 1500L. Also Grapes of Wrath is a 5th grade quantitative level, but the task is more complex and therefore appropriate for high school.
  • After careful close reading, students should be able to answer these Essential Questions.
  • Now go to the posters and make draw your symbol or character. Have you “moved” or “increased your comfort level?”

Transcript

  • 1. Supporting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) through Social Studies Presented by Becky Reed, Delaware Geographic Alliance August 3, 2013
  • 2. Common Core Standards Ladder Standard1–ReadingCloselyandMakingLogicalInferences Standard10–TextComplexity Standard 9 – Compare Similar Texts for Ways Texts Develop Similar Claims Standard 8 – Analyze the Trustworthiness and Soundness the Support to the Claims Standard 7– Integrate and Evaluate Content in Different Media Standard 6 – Reading to Assess the Author’s Point of View and How it Shapes the Text Standard 5 – Analyze the Structure of a Text Standard 4 – Analyze How Word Choice Shapes Meaning Standard 3 – Analyze How Individuals, Events and Ideas Develop and Interact in a Text Standard 2 – Determine Central Ideas and Themes Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Key Ideas and Details
  • 3. What is your comfort level with the CCSS-ELA?
  • 4. Surtsey
  • 5. Mont Saint-Michel
  • 6. Hawaii
  • 7. Australia
  • 8. What is your comfort level with the CCSS-ELA? Surtsey Mont Saint-Michel Hawaii Australia
  • 9. Regions Delaware Geography Standard Four Students will explain how conflict and cooperation among people contributes to the division of the Earth's surface into distinctive cultural regions and political territories.
  • 10. Human Systems Geography Standard 13 How the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth's surface
  • 11. The World’s Most Exclusive Condominium What do you think this article is about? A condominium is a term used by geographers to describe a place where the ownership of a place is shared.
  • 12. Students will explain how conflict and cooperation among people contributes to the division of the Earth's surface into distinctive cultural regions and political territories. As you read, look for examples of conflict and the ways countries have cooperated to resolve issues of sovereignty (ownership). Read to the first star. 1
  • 13. Standard 1 Reading Closely and Making Logical Inferences • What is the purpose of this text? Remember that Standard 1 is to be addressed throughout the reading. We will revisit this standard again.
  • 14. Standard 2 Determine Central Ideas and Themes • What is the central idea? • Is there more than one central idea? • Cite evidence from the text to support your determination of the central idea.
  • 15. Continue Reading…. Read to the second star. 2 • Is the idea that I thought was central to this text turning out to still be central? • Is the article forwarding other ideas more strongly?
  • 16. Standard 3 Analyze How Individuals, Events and Ideas Develop and Interact in a Text • What did you notice about the sequence of events? • Why were facts presented in the way they were? • How are the first paragraphs related to the other paragraphs?
  • 17. Continue Reading…. Read the remaining paragraphs. Stop before the footnotes section.
  • 18. Standard 4 Analyze How Word Choice Shapes Meaning • What words seem more important or suggestive than others? Are some words symbolic? Are some surprising? • What about the tone of the article? How would you describe it? What support do you find for that?
  • 19. Standard 4 Analyze How Word Choice Shapes Meaning
  • 20. Standard 5 Analyze the Structure of a Text • How are the details of this text arranged? (cause/effect, chronological, compare/contr ast, description, problem/solution) • What key words support your choice?
  • 21. Standard 6 Reading to Assess the Author’s Point of View and How it Shapes the Text • How does the author feel towards the subject of the document? • What loaded or biased language do you notice, if any?
  • 22. Standards 7,8 and 9 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas • What medium most impacts your understanding of the selected work? • Are these claims valid/invalid, and if so, why? • What evidence does each author use to shape his/her claim?
  • 23. CNN Report, April 24, 2013 Japan Threatens China over Disputed Islands Landings (France 24, April 23, 2013)
  • 24. Chinese army-designed video game lets players fight Japan for the Diaoyu Islands Washington Post (online), July 26, 2013
  • 25. Asia's disputed islands -- who claims what? From the East China Sea to the South China Sea, tensions have long simmered between rival countries seeking ownership of a range of territory, from lush island chains to barren, rocky outcrops. CNN looks at the main flashpoints.
  • 26. Standard 10 Read and Comprehend Text Independently and Proficiently • What parts did you understand? • What can you do to aide in your comprehension? • Briefly summarize the central idea of the text.
  • 27. Standard 10 Read and Comprehend Text Independently and Proficiently Quantitative Measure Flesch-Kincaid = 10.8
  • 28. Standard 10 Read and Comprehend Text Independently and Proficiently 3 Considerations for Determining Text Complexity
  • 29. The Results!!! Essential Questions: • What are the advantages and disadvantages of condominiums? • Why do conflicts occur when political and cultural boundaries are drawn? How are they resolved?
  • 30. NOW, what is your comfort level with the CCSS-ELA? Surtsey Mont Saint-Michel Hawaii Australia
  • 31. Common Core Standards Ladder Standard1–ReadingCloselyandMakingLogicalInferences Standard10–TextComplexity Standard 9 – Compare Similar Texts for Ways Texts Develop Similar Claims Standard 8 – Analyze the Trustworthiness and Soundness the Support to the Claims Standard 7– Integrate and Evaluate Content in Different Media Standard 6 – Reading to Assess the Author’s Point of View and How it Shapes the Text Standard 5 – Analyze the Structure of a Text Standard 4 – Analyze How Word Choice Shapes Meaning Standard 3 – Analyze How Individuals, Events and Ideas Develop and Interact in a Text Standard 2 – Determine Central Ideas and Themes Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Key Ideas and Details