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Social Media Orlando Training

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These slides are from a class taught at the Orlando Regional REALTOR Association on Social Media for Real Estate

These slides are from a class taught at the Orlando Regional REALTOR Association on Social Media for Real Estate

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  • Think of social media somewhat like a cocktail party. You know some people. You don’t know others. You chat. You connect. You network. And you use good social skills and manners.
  • The most popular social networks today are facebook, twitter, and LinkedIn.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Media for Real Estate
        • The Basics – Social Media 101
        • Goals of My Social Media Marketing
        • Facebook – Profiles, Fan Pages, Groups
        • Twitter – Basics & Search
        • How does social media fit into my overall marketing strategy?
        • Tips for integration
        • How do I know if I am being effective?
      Rebecca Chandler Director of Marketing, Network Communications
    • 2. Social Media in Plain English http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6a_KF7TYKVc
    • 3. Social Media
    • 4. At some point . . . . You have to leave the house and talk to people face to face.
    • 5. Social Networks
      • Facebook
      • Twitter
    • 6. Goals Increase your reach & influence
      • Cultivate new relationships – and new business
      • Warm up “cold calls”
      • Maintain and deepen your relationships with your past clients (referrals, sphere of influence)
      • Become the trusted advisor on local real estate or your area of expertise
      • Gain additional exposure for your listings
      • Build your personal brand
    • 7. What are your goals?
    • 8. Start with Facebook
      • www.facebook.com
    • 9. 61% of Facebook users are over 25 43% are between 26-44 53% are 18-34 In July, Facebook added its 30 millionth subscriber Women over 55 are the fastest growing demographic group on Facebook
    • 10. 3 Steps to Get Started
      • Step 1
      • Create a Personal Profile – These connections merge business and personal interests
      • Example - Rebecca Chandler on Facebook
      • Go to www.facebook.com/rebchandler
      • (you must create an account to view full profile)
      • Step 2
      • Become a Fan of Orlando Regional REALTOR Association
      • Search for “pages” become a fan
      • http://www.facebook.com/pages/Orlando-FL/Orlando-Regional-REALTORR-Association/208476455485?v=wall&viewas=1406460781&ref=search
      • Step 3
      • Create a Your own Fan Page
    • 11. Starting on Facebook
      • Create account
      • Fill out profile
      • Fill out privacy settings
      • Build up friend list (over time)
        • Click on “Friends”
        • Click on “Find people you know on Facebook”
        • Let Facebook look through your email
        • Let Facebook suggest people you know
      • Search for people
        • By name
        • By school
        • Include a personal note to remind them of who you are. Don’t sell here . .
    • 12. Organize Your Contacts in Groups
    • 13. Privacy Settings
    • 14. You can select your level of privacy
    • 15. Greet Your Friends
      • Respond with a personal message to friend requests.
    • 16.
      • Your Personal Profile
      • Communicate
      • One-to-one
      • One to a few
      • A few to a few
      • Uses
      • Client & prospect marketing
      • Client Service
      • Retention (referrals, repeat business)
      • Professional relationships
      • Goals
      • Engaging with potential prospects and
      • clients is a personal interaction.
      • Your brand is a service you provide to consumers to help them invest wisely in real estate
      • You embody your brand
      • Example –
      • www.facebook.com/rebchandler
      • (You must have be registered and logged in with Facebook to see full profile)
      Organizing Your Facebook Identity
    • 17. Setting Up a Username
    • 18. Organizing Your Facebook Identity
      • Fan Page & Groups
      • Communicate
      • One to many
      • Many to many
      • Uses
      • Customer acquisition
      • Customer referrals
      • Information distribution
      • Goals
      • Local distribution of brand content
      • Create a social community for your local market
      • Examples – www.realestatebookfacebook.com
      • http://www.facebook.com/pages/Austin-TX/The-GoodLife-Team/59664051549?ref=search&sid=1406460781.4218624227..1
    • 19. Organizing Your Facebook Identity
      • Your Personal Profile
      • Communicate
      • One-to-one
      • One to a few
      • A few to a few
      • Uses
      • Customer & prospect marketing
      • Customer service
      • Customer retention
      • Professional relationship
      • Goals
      • Engaging with potential prospects and
      • clients is a personal interaction.
      • Your brand is a service you provide to consumers to help them invest wisely in real estate
      • You embody your brand
      • Example –
      • www.facebook.com/rebchandler
      • (You must have be registered and logged in with Facebook to see full profile)
      • Fan Page & Groups
      • Communicate
      • One to many
      • Many to many
      • Uses
      • Customer acquisition
      • Customer referrals
      • Information distribution
      • Goals
      • Local distribution of brand content
      • Create a social community for your local market
      • Brand Example – www.realestatebookfacebook.com
    • 20. Do’s and Don’ts for Your Personal BUSINESS Profile (see friend groups & privacy settings for more options on how to organize & distribute content.)
      • Do Post
      • Industry-related articles
      • Links to your relevant sites or blogs
      • Testimonials from your clients
      • Congratulations
      • Links to your listings
      • Related events & photos afterward
      • Engaging and humorous insights that are appropriate for business and relative to your client
      • Enough personal information about yourself to make others comfortable around you.
      • Don’t Post
      • The “What Charlie’s Angel Are You?” quiz, etc.
      • Your religious or political beliefs. Those who disagree with you may not want to do business with you.
      • Constantly. It makes it look like you have nothing better to do.
      • Negative comments – stay positive.
      • Smears on your competition.
      • Hundreds of photos of your grandkids, dog, cats, etc. Some are appropriate.
      • Anything that would make others hesitant to hire you or uncomfortable around you.
    • 21.
      • Use Social Media to Your Advantage, but Beware the Pitfalls
      • Perspective by Walt Baczkowski
      • RISMEDIA, July 22, 2009 -Social media is, and has been, exploding as a way for people to stay connected, market services and generally communicate with each other. Although a supporter/proponent for Realtors to embrace social media-for the benefits provided in marketing or staying in touch with customers or clients-there are also several pitfalls that should be considered.
      • The biggest pet peeve I have with the social media explosion is the amount of “stuff” I now know about you. Based on the posts I saw just this morning on Facebook, you have nothing better to do than play the word or virtual reality games.
      • I also don’t care “what animal represents your spirit” or “what character from ‘The Godfather’ are you.” The fact that you are turning on the television for your kids at 5 a.m.-then posting this information on Facebook 10 minutes later-is not something that needs to be told to the world.
      • Several pages I have seen posted by business associates have contained some very un-businesslike comments as well as photographs . If I were a potential client or customer searching for more information about you before establishing a business arrangement-based on the information posted at more than 10 sites visited-I would be on to my next possibility.
      • Colleges, prospective employers and law enforcement regularly check the Web to find out more about you. So what are they learning? Would you provide this information if you were in a conversation with them? What image or impression is your social media activity conveying? This would be a good time for you to take a look at your profile, comments and information posted from the perspective of the entities cited above. Also remember that once the information is posted on the Web, it is in the wind.
      • My biggest concern is the growth in negative or vindictive postings. Most schools already have policies regarding “cyber-bullying,” and we have already seen some disastrous results from this activity. Also, at the Midyear meetings in May, NAR established policy regarding the posting of negative comments regarding other Realtors. Some excellent sites already exist for rating services, such as angieslist.com. Others have proven only to be sites on which people post negative thoughts or comments. Expect to hear more regarding this activity in the near future.
      • Consider your postings, blogs and profiles as if you were a prospective customer or college recruiter. What message do you think they would receive?
      • Read more: http://rismedia.com/2009-07-21/use-social-media-to-your-advantage-but-beware-the-pitfalls-2/#ixzz0MCy3ZmOY
    • 22. Facebook Pages vs. Facebook Groups: What’s the Difference?
      • May 27th, 2009 | by Howard Greenstein a Social Media Strategy and Marketing consultant, and President of the Harbrooke Group . He’s also a national board member of Social Media Club .
      • “ Should I create a Group or launch a Page?”
      • Because Groups and Pages have an overlapping feature set, even senior social media marketing consultants are sometimes stumped as to what to tell their clients. And Facebook continues to make changes to how Pages function , complicating the matter even further.
    • 23. What is a PAGE on Facebook?
      • From Facebook –
      • “ Facebook created Pages when we noticed that people were trying to connect with brands and famous artists in ways that didn’t quite work on Facebook…
      • Not only can you connect with your favorite artists and businesses, but now you also can show your friends what you care about and recommend by adding Pages to your personal profile.”
      • So, when you become a fan of a brand, a band, a movie, or a person, that information is posted on your wall, and your friends might see it too. You can see which Pages your friends are fans of via the “Info” tab on their profile.
    • 24. To create a fan page, one simply has to go to facebook.com/pages/create.php and create a new page.
    • 25. Setting Up a Username for Your Page
    • 26. Value of Fan Pages
      • Facebook Pages can be thought of in much the same way as normal profiles on the site – Brand or celebrity pages have the ability to have friends, add pictures, and they have walls that fans can post on.
      • Pages communicate by “updates” which show on the update tab or a person’s wall if they’re a fan and have allowed the page to show updates.
      • Pages can have applications as well.
    • 27. Here, for example, is the Mashable Page on Facebook: facebook.com/mashable
    • 28. Here’s The Real Estate Book’s National Brand Page www.realestatebookfacebook.com Like a normal Facebook profile, Pages have tabs that uncover more information.
    • 29. Accessing Your Fan Page From your personal profile, click on the “fan page” icon at the bottom left of the page.
    • 30. View Stats
    • 31. What’s a Group? Groups are a bit different than Pages. To create a group you go to facebook.com/groups/create.php and then fill in information about the type of group, and decide if it is open to a particular network or all of Facebook. You can set join permissions on groups so that they are either open to anyone, closed (where users must get administrator approval to join) or secret (invite only).
    • 32.
      • You can set join permissions on groups so that they are either open to anyone, closed (where users must get administrator approval to join) or secret (invite only).
      • Groups have administrators that manage the group, approve applicants or invite others to join.
      • Administrators can also appoint “officers” who are nominally in charge – however, being an officer doesn’t mean the person has the ability to administer the group.
      • Because of these privacy settings, Facebook’s groups are analogous to clubs in the offline world. Administrators can invite members to join via Facebook mail and email, and public groups can be found via Facebook search.
      What’s a Group?
    • 33. Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
      • Groups Are Linked to You Personally
      • Only groups under 5,000 members can send email blasts
      • Facebook Groups are set up for more personal interaction.
      • Groups are also directly connected to the people who administer them, meaning that activities that go on there could reflect on you personally.
      • Facebook considers groups to be an extension of your personal actions. When you post something as a group administrator, it appears to be coming from you and is attached to your personal profile.
      • Pages Are More Corporate
      • Pages, on the other hand, don’t list the names of administrators, and are thought of as a person, almost like a corporate entity is considered a ‘person’ under the law.
      • Pages can create content that comes from the Page itself, so that content doesn’t have to be linked to you personally.
      • Pages are indexed by external search engines such as Google, just like a public profile while Groups are not.
      • Pages can be made publicly accessible – even to those not on Facebook.
    • 34. Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
      • Groups Email
      • As long as a Group is under 5,000 Facebook members, Group administrators can send messages to the Group members that will appear in their inboxes in Facebook.
      • Pages Update
      • Page administrators can send updates to fans through the Page, and these updates will appear in the “Updates” section of fans’ inboxes. There is no limit on how many fans you may send an update to, or how many total fans a Page can have.
    • 35. Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
      • Groups are like a private club
      • Groups offer far more control over who gets to participate. Permissions settings make it possible for group admins to restrict access to a group, so that new members have to be approved.
      • Pages are less restrictive
      • Access to a Page, however, can only be restricted by certain ages and locations.
    • 36. Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
      • Applications
      • Pages can host applications, so a Page can essentially be more personalized and show more content.
      • Groups can’t do this.
    • 37. Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
      • Moderation
      • Neither Groups nor Pages have great moderation features. They can both be a little granular as to how things get posted, who can post, and what kind of media can be posted, but that’s about it.
      • If someone posts spam on your Group or your Page, you have to remove it manually, and you can also remove specific members.
    • 38.
      • Ability to create events
      • Both Groups and Pages allow you to create related Events, which show up under the users’ Request (and later in the upcoming events page on the sidebar of their dashboard if they’ve RSVP’d).
      • Neither have any added functionality beyond the generally available Facebook Events application
      Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
    • 39.
      • The bottom line
      • Groups are great for organizing on a personal level and for smaller scale interaction around a cause.
      • Pages are better for brands, businesses, bands, movies, or celebrities who want to interact with their fans or customers without having them connected to a personal account, and have a need to exceed Facebook’s 5,000 friend cap.
      Pages vs. Groups: Factors to consider when choosing a Page or a Group
    • 40. For other tips --
      • www.mashable.com
      • www.Realestatezebra.com
      • www.ignitesocialmedia.com
      • http://www.facebook.com/TPREG?ref=search&sid=1028582269.444913776..1
      • http://www.facebook.com/pages/Austin-TX/The-GoodLife-Team/59664051549?ref=search&sid=1406460781.4218624227..1
      • Become a fan of those you think are doing it well and gain insight and ideas.
      • SHARE
      • So many experts, so little time
    • 41. Twitter
      • Sign up
      • Tweet – 140 characters or less
      • Follow
      • TwitBacks.com
      • MyTweetSpace.com
    • 42. Sign Up
      • www.twitter.com
    • 43. Profile
    • 44. Who should I “follow?”
      • Those to whom you connect.
      • Think quality, not quantity
      • @respres, @bross, @rebeccachandler,
      • www.demandspot.com
    • 45. Home
    • 46.
      • Do’s
      • Make a list of pertinent and relevant topics
      • Identify resources for content
      • Commit to schedule
      • Don’ts
      • Machine gun tweet
      • Spam
      • Auto DM
    • 47. Sources for content
      • Local sites
      • Your site
      • Your blog
      • Link to your listings, open houses, etc.
      • www.mytechopinion.com
    • 48. Twitter Search
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGbLWQYJ6iM
    • 49. Hash # tags
      • #orra
      • #realestate
      • #orlando
    • 50. Retweet/Replies
    • 51. Shorten urls and manage tweets with these online tools
      • Hootsuite.com
      • Bit.ly
      • Tinyurl.com
    • 52. Make a commitment
      • Tweet regularly
      • Follow
      • Listen & respond
      • Supplement with spontaneous tweets
    • 53. Mobile apps
      • iPhone
        • Tweetdeck
        • Tweetie
        • Twitterific
        • TwitterFon
      • Blackberry
        • Twitterberry
    • 54. How do I know if I’m being effective? Are you gaining contacts & business? Or Are you talking to each other?
    • 55. Integrate Into Your Overall Marketing Plan Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • 56. Offline source – i.e., your business card, print ad or flyer Facebook Fan Page Phone calls, emails Map property & drive by Your Website Twitter Facebook Profile
      • Keeping prospective clients engaged will
      • Generate new leads through friends & followers
      • Maintain past client relationships,
      • Help you gain listings,
      • Expose your properties to more buyers,
      • Build your personal brand
      Did you know? *68% of online searches are prompted by an offline source? *Jupiter Research, LLC
    • 57. Join My Social Network
      • www.facebook.com/rebchandler
      • www.twitter.com/rebeccachandler
      • www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccachandler
      • www.facebook.realestatebook.com
      • [email_address]
      • Rebecca Chandler
      • Director of Marketing, Network Communications
      • 770-962-7220 ext. 24672

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