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Taken from http://www.readinsaginaw.org/Docs/ThreePsofReading.pdf
Sample Prompts
Here are some examples of prompts that ef...
• Try skipping the word for now and maybe you will get it after you finish reading the
sentence.
• Try using another word ...
Three Ps of Reading Pause Prompt Praise
Three Ps of Reading Pause Prompt Praise
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Three Ps of Reading Pause Prompt Praise

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The Three P's of Reading- Pause, Prompt, Praise..cause Problems Problems Problems...
www.readaustralia.com

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Three Ps of Reading Pause Prompt Praise

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  2. 2. Taken from http://www.readinsaginaw.org/Docs/ThreePsofReading.pdf Sample Prompts Here are some examples of prompts that effectively support children in their reading in different situations. The actual prompts you use will depend on the child’s confidence and ability to use different strategies, as well as on what you and the child have worked on previously and the text you are now reading. Prompts really are impromptu suggestions that grow out of the text and child’s ability to make sense of it. Even though prompting soon becomes natural and automatic, you may want to keep a list of some possible prompts and a list of strategies near at hand just to get started. 1. If a child has made an attempt to figure out the word but has been unsuccessful, value the attempt and follow it up with information or a suggestion that might help the child make a prediction. For example you might say: • That’s a good try. See if you can find any clue in the picture that might help you. • I noticed that you used the picture to help you. Try looking at the first sound in the word and see if it helps you find a word in the picture that might fit there. 2. Try to make a link to a word that was in a book the child has already read or to another story. This kind of prompt encourages the child to draw on previous experiences as a reader and make connections between texts. • Rabbit made one of these in the story you read yesterday. • This part tells about the size of the whale, like the dinosaur book did. 3. If the child stops at a word and does not seem to know what to do next, encourage him or her to think about some strategies to try. Then experiment with any suggestion the child makes, to see how it works. • What do you think we might do to help figure out this word? 4. If the child is still unable to figure out a word after several attempts, then you will need to suggest solutions. • Let’s try leaving it out and moving on this time. • Try rereading the sentence and taking another run at the word. • Read on and see if that helps.
  3. 3. • Try skipping the word for now and maybe you will get it after you finish reading the sentence. • Try using another word that you think might work there. THIS is what we should be advising parents…..the opposite of what is shown above. The three cueing model (known in England as the Searchlight model) is finally and explicitly discredited. Instead, the Strategy has acknowledged the value of addressing decoding and comprehension separately in the initial stage of reading instruction. “ … attention should be focused on decoding words rather than the use of unreliable strategies such as looking at the illustrations, rereading the sentence, saying the first sound or guessing what might ‘fit’. Although these strategies might result in intelligent guesses, none of them is sufficiently reliable and they can hinder the acquisition and application of phonic knowledge and skills, prolonging the word recognition process and lessening children’s overall understanding. Children who routinely adopt alternative cues for reading unknown words, instead of learning to decode them, later find themselves stranded when texts become more demanding and meanings less predictable. The best route for children to become fluent and independent readers lies in securing phonics as the prime approach to decoding unfamiliar words (Primary National Strategy, 2006b, p.9).” One might think that after the publication of numerous authoritative reports on skilled reading and how to promote it (such as that of the National Reading Panel. 2000, the Rose Report and the AU Inquiry into the Teaching of Reading 2005), this tired hypothesis would have been long ago assigned to the history folder. Instead, we will find it somewhere, in just about every 'literacy policy document' in every school across Australia.... Find yours, and burn it. Then ask for SSP training:-) Miss Emma The Reading Whisperer Director- Read Australia Partner – Wiring Brains Education Reference: http://nifdi.org/news-latest-2/blog-hempenstall/402-the-three-cueing-system-in- reading-will-it-ever-go-away

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