Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions

1,508

Published on

You will also learn: …

You will also learn:

* Common symptoms of dyslexia by grade-level
* Research supporting the differences in the dyslexic brain
* Practical Orton-Gillingham principles that you can use right away with your dyslexic student or child.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,508
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
49
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Reading Horizons presents: Dyslexia: From Symptoms to Solutions
  • 2. “Dyslexia is not a disease to have and to be cured of, but a way of thinking and learning. Often it’s agifted mind waiting to be found and taught.” -Girard Sagmiller, “Dyslexia My Life”
  • 3. What is dyslexia? Dyslexia: A significant reading disability in people with normal intelligence. There is now definite proof that dyslexia is a very real neurological disorder.
  • 4. Dyslexia Yale Study with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 61 Students: 29 Dyslexic
  • 5. Primary visual cortex Inferior frontal gyrus Visual perception Angural gyrus Superior temporalUnimpaired gyrus Student
  • 6. Inferior frontal gyrus Visual perceptionDyslexic (Attempts to convert visual informationStudent into sounds)
  • 7. Research Shows: Dyslexic students “can learn these relationships with intensive phonics training. . . After more than a century of frustration, it has now been shown that the brain can be rewired.” Dr. Sally Shaywitz
  • 8. Overcoming Dyslexiaby Dr. Sally Shaywitz Knopf Publishing, New York (2003) ISBN: 0-375-40012-5
  • 9. Word Processing and Storage• Word Form Storage: phonological (sound), orthographical (symbol), morphological (roots and affixes, parts of speech)• Phonological Loop: time-sensitive coordination of phonological codes (eye to Mouth to ear)• Orthographic Loop: time-sensitive coordination of orthographic codes (ear to HAND to eye)
  • 10. Symptoms of Dyslexia• Difficulty linking letters with sounds• Difficulty with multi-syllable words• Fluency and rhythm of reading• Poor spelling• Poor handwriting• Difficulties learning a foreign language• In emotional pain
  • 11. Dyslexia’s effects on reading• Trouble reading unfamiliar words• Omitting parts of words when reading• Fear of reading out loud• Reading is slow and tiring• A reliance on context to discern meaning• Oral reading is choppy and labored• Avoidance of reading for pleasure
  • 12. Key to success…• Avoid as much frustration as possible
  • 13. Working Memory Working memory, or executive function, helps a student do several things: – Filter inputs so they know what information to pay attention to, – Prioritize inputs so they know what information is most important, – Categorize inputs so they know what types of information they are working with, and – Connect inputs to previous knowledge so they know how new information relates to what they already know.
  • 14. Solutions• Teach Orton-Gillingham Principles – Multi-sensory – Systematic – Logical sequence – Oral language – Written language
  • 15. Solutions
  • 16. “Systematic phonics instruction has been used widely over a long period of time with positive results, and a variety of systematic phonics programs have proven effective with children of different ages, abilities, and socio-economic backgrounds. These facts and finding provide converging evidence that explicit, systemic phonics instruction is a valuable and essential part of successful reading program.”~ National Reading Panel Report
  • 17. Types of assessmentshttp://athome.readinghorizons.com/assessments/index.aspx• Word Recognition• Phonemic Awareness• Most Common Word• Word Segmentation
  • 18. Should I get my child tested? Pros Cons •Diagnosis provides •Fear of “label” help by law •Expensive •Understand solution •Where to get a test?
  • 19. Appropriate Reading RatesReading fluency, as defined by Dr. Neil Anderson, is "reading at an appropriate rate with adequate comprehension" (Anderson, 2008, p. 3).What is an “appropriate rate?”
  • 20. Silent Reading Rates Oral Reading Rates 1st grade: 80 wpm 1st grade: 53 wpm 2nd grade: 115 wpm 2nd grade: 89 wpm 3rd grade: 138 wpm 3rd grade: 107 wpm 4th grade: 158 wpm 4th grade: 123 wpm 5th grade: 173 wpm 5th grade: 139 wpm 6th grade: 185 wpm 6th grade: 150 wpm 7th grade: 195 wpm 7th grade: 150 wpm 8th grade: 204 wpm 8th grade: 151 wpm 9th grade: 214 wpm 10th grade: 224 wpm 11th grade: 237 wpm 12th grade: 250 wpm College or University: 280 wpm
  • 21. Access Your Free E-Bookhttp://readinghorizons.com/resources/disabilites.pdf
  • 22. Please visit: www.ReadingHorizons.com Shantell@ReadingHorizons.com Erika@ReadingHorizons.com

×