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Part 3 - Notes

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Reach Out Pro Module - Connecting Our Worlds …

Reach Out Pro Module - Connecting Our Worlds
Part 3

This tutorial contains some ideas on how to incorporate technology in your work. We consider many types of technology to be alternative and complementary mechanisms for achieving your current objectives in your work with young people, namely, engagement, monitoring, the provision of psycho-education, psychological treatment, relapse prevention and promoting wellness. Therefore, using technology should not add additional complexities to how you do things, but can either replace or enhance your current modes of treatment delivery.

Part 3 of the ReachOutPro educational module will cover the following programs
and tools:
1. Using websites or social media to build rapport
2. Using SMS to enhance engagement
3. Fun ways to provide psycho-education
4. Treating mild to moderate anxiety and depression
5. Assisting with monitoring of mental state
6. Encouraging community engagement and connection
7. Enhancing wellness and relapse prevention
8. Using social media for health promotion


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  • 1. Part 3 -Practical ideasfor usingtechnology inclinical practiceConnecting Our WorldsReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3. Technology in practice
  • 2. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Part 3- Practical ideas for using technology in clinical practice Introduction This section will contain some ideas on how to incorporate technology in your work. We consider many types of technology to be alternative and complementary mechanisms for achieving your current objectives in your work with young people. Namely, engagement, monitoring, the provision of psycho-education, psychological treatment, relapse prevention and promoting wellness. Therefore, using technology should not add additional complexities to how you do things, but can either replace or enhance your current modes of treatment delivery. The options outlined below are merely suggestions that may be of benefit to your practice, and we encourage you to work with the young person in formulating how each technique might meet their, and your own, individual needs. Part 3 of the ReachOutPro educational module will cover the following programs and tools: 1. Using websites or social media to build rapport 2. Using SMS to enhance engagement 3. Fun ways to provide psycho-education 4. Treating mild to moderate anxiety and depression 5. Assisting with monitoring of mental state 6. Encouraging community engagement and connection 7. Enhancing wellness and relapse prevention 8. Using social media for health promotion Learning objectives: Through the use of Part 3, you will gain an understanding of: • Tools and technologies that can enhance clinical practice by building rapport and connectedness with young people; • How to use these tools in your work with young people. At the end of Part 3, you will be able to test your understanding of these concepts by completing the quiz. [LINK] Page 2
  • 3. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 1. Using websites or social media to build rapport How could this help my practice with young people? For some young people, the traditional face to face interaction that is part of an initial assessment can be extremely confronting and uncomfortable. During the initial assessment phase, there is a need to build the therapeutic relationship in order to gain information and to engage the young person so that they will return for follow-up. This can be challenging – particularly if the young person feels that the clinician does not understand their world or their perspective. Many clinicians have found that engaging an unmotivated or unwilling young person can often require some flexibility and creativity. Such techniques might include completing the assessment at a site other than a clinic or office, or engaging in a mutual activity so that the focus of attention is not purely on the young person and their “problem”. Young people spend a large portion of their time on the Internet, expressing and developing their identities through websites and social networks. They select the information that they want to present about themselves through the pictures they share, their stories, the way they interact with others and the posts that they allow to be made in their online space. The way they do this, and how other’s respond, helps to shape their own sense of identity. Utilising the internet during consultations can facilitate “meeting the young person in their own space”. This can help to build rapport and the therapeutic relationship by showing the young person that you understand their world, and if you don’t, are at least willing to explore it with their guidance. How do I do it? Enquiring about a young person’s connection to a website or social network space such as Facebook or MySpace or whether they have a blog can help to engage them. It can also provide useful insights into their world. This means firstly, checking that the young person is comfortable with sharing this information with you. After they’ve agreed it means offering them control of the computer to access the page, asking them to walk you through what they like about the site, or about the things that they would like to show you. Looking at their page online with the young person can help to direct the attention away from them, while at the same time allowing for the development of rapport by sharing information about their lives, friendships, interests and so on. There’s also an element of trust and openness by allowing the young person to show you their pages whilst using your computer. This can be particularly useful in cases where the young person is anxious about face-to-face interaction, such as those who present with social anxiety, or are hesitant to talk about themselves, which may be common in depression. It’s essential to take care to respect the young person’s privacy and allow them to navigate through the page to ensure that they have control over what information to reveal to you. You are also empowering them by allowing them to guide a proportion of the assessment rather than being the one who is constantly in control. Page 3
  • 4. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer with good processing speed • Access to broadband or wireless internet connection • Internet access with permission to access social networking sites such as Facebook, tumblr, Bebo, MySpace (check your organisation’s firewall settings around this) OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) with wifi or 3G Knowledge • You don’t need to know anything about technology - ask the young person to show you • But you do need to be comfortable with asking the young person to show you Useful tips • Allow the young person to take you through the page. • Initially ask them to show you the things that are important to them. • Query them about the page or the things that you view as you would in discussion about any other interest. • For young people with creative flair, they may have online pieces that demonstrate how they feel in a more effective way than they can explain through words. Page 4
  • 5. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “We love social networking sites such as Facebook and Myspace. We also like sites such as Livejournal and Twitter. If you understand what we like to do, we are more inclined to be open with you about our world. What I’m saying is... be curious about what we get up to in our spare time. Ask us about these sites and whether we use them. If you know and understand what us young people like to do in our spare time, we are more willing to show you these sites. Even if you don’t know much about them, let us know that you are curious. Who knows, we might even be willing to let you in on how we use them. Remember, this doesn’t just apply to internet sites, this applies to everything.” Becks Page 5
  • 6. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 2. Using SMS (short messaging service) to improve attendance, develop rapport and provide inter-session encouragement. How could this help my practice with young people? Typically, working with young people carries a higher rate of non-attendance than for the average adult population. In line with their stage of cognitive development, some young people find it difficult to forward plan, reflect and remember their appointment times. Motivation to attend can also waiver or unexpected demands come up, and this can often lead to intermittent attendance. SMS reminders can provide a means to circumvent these difficulties and tends to be considered less confronting and more palatable than a phone call. Moreover, many young people will choose not to answer a phone call from an unknown number. Sending an SMS to confirm appointments, or providing a number that the young person can SMS if they can’t attend will enhance communication and improve attendance rates. Alternatively, you can use SMS coaching with the young person between sessions to help them consolidate skills and complete tasks between session. How do I do it? STEP-BY-STEP guide 1. Let the young person know that you’d like to contact them using SMS. 2. Explain why you would contact them and what such contact will be for. Is it for appointment reminders on the day, or day before appointments? A general check in to see how things are going, or a warning that you’d like to give them a call to check in? 3. Let the young person know your hours of work and when you have access to the mobile phone/service you are using to send SMS. 4. Explain whether or not they are able to return contact through the number that the SMS was sent from (NB. Some online messaging services that are used for appointments do not allow responses to be sent. This needs to be clarified). 5. If the young person is able to return communications, set parameters around what is appropriate contact from them. What do you want them to tell you? What happens if the SMS indicates risk? 6. Get their permission to contact them. 7. Confirm best number to contact them on (NB. This is particularly important as initial contact may have come through the parents so the number on file may not actually be the young person’s). 8. Set up a trial period for the young person to use SMS and review at next consultation. 9. Send SMS. 10. Record contact in patient notes. Page 6
  • 7. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • Mobile phone, or • Access to an internet capable computer Knowledge • Basic competence in using mobile SMS, or • Basic navigation of websites Useful tips • Refer to Part 4 of this module for advice on organisational protocols. • Remember, your availability to be contacted by mobile should come with the same ground rules for young people that you might set for contacting you at the office. Common areas include what is and isn’t appropriate contact, how much time the young person needs to give you to reply, what happens if you are not at work. Page 7
  • 8. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “I think texting is a great way to confirm appointments or even to remind young people about homework (if they are ok with this!). I even got a text one time from a counsellor right before she knew I had to face a really anxiety provoking experience - it came out of the blue and was a once off thing to remind me of what we had talked about and let me know she was thinking of me and believed in me. It made SUCH a difference!” Meke Page 8
  • 9. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 3. Fun ways to provide psycho- education How could this help my practice with young people? Most young people, although keen to connect with information, are reticent to receive photocopies which may contain out-dated or irrelevant information. Along with this they may have concerns about privacy should a family member or friend find this information or that they may lose it before they have a chance to read it. Given this, many people go looking online for information [1]. Several options for providing psycho-education are available on line specifically developed for young people that can be accessed in their own time. So don’t be limited by the need for traditional information sheets. A number of online games (aka Serious Games) have been recently developed to appeal to young people in order to provide psycho-education on several relevant issues. Similarly, YouTube is a goldmine for resources that can provide education as are apps. Even personal stories can be found online to normalise the young person’s experience. The important thing is to ensure the information provided is accurate and appropriate for the young person that you are working with. With so much information being available on the internet it can be hard for the young person to tell what is good information and what isn’t. This is potentially a key area of people working with young people to address. Given this, we recommend that whatever resource you decide to use, you may want to take the young person though the sites during a session or “prescribe” it for them to complete over the week. Providing them with recommendations of alternative sites and guidelines on how to judge information is also encouraged. How do I do it? 1. Use your clinical judgement with any online information website or game you suggest to a young person. 2. Check out of the program first, know what it does and how it does it, and even use it yourself before recommending it. 3. Explain to the young person what the site is about, how it will benefit them, where to find it and how to use it. 4. Set expectations a. What to expect from the site (eg., serious games are unlikely to be up to the standard of gaming young people expect so this needs to be communicated early to them so that aren’t disappointed). b. About the engagement with the site (eg., is it a once off or is it on ongoing tool for them to use?). Page 9
  • 10. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Some examples of Serious Games include: Other sites for psycho-education include: Reach Out Central ReachOut http://roc.reachout.com.au/flash/index.html http://www.reachout.com Many others can be found here: SANE Australia http://www.healthgamesresearch.org/database/ www.sane.org results/taxonomy%3A254 headspace http://www.headspace.org.au/ Youth Beyond Blue http://www.youthbeyondblue.com/ What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer with good processing speed [link to definition of processing speed] • Access to broadband internet connection • Internet access that facilitates access to external websites OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) Knowledge • Prior knowledge of sites • Ability to evaluate the quality of the resources online • Basic competence in using websites • Basic competence in using iPhone applications Useful tips • Work with the young person to set realistic expectations of use. • Discuss when / where they will do it Page 10
  • 11. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “The utilisation of technology will not necessarily provide all the answers to questions a young person may have, and any treatment(s) certainly cannot be done entirely through technology in a significant number of cases, so you as a health care professional don’t need to make the radical switch from ‘complete offline’ to ‘complete online’ support. Use it as a complementary tool in a language and method that’s understood by young people.” Chris Page 11
  • 12. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 4. To treat mild to moderate anxiety and depression How could this help my practice with young people? Recent research into online treatment for anxiety and depression has shown promising results in both the adolescent and adult populations [2-6]. More recently, there has been an increasing interest in online programs for young people, with a recent review highlighting that six out of eight studies identified a reduction in depression and/or anxiety symptoms post-intervention [6]. Such programs are often considered to be more engaging and appealing to young people [7], and can overcome traditional barriers to access. Utilising an online cognitive behavioural or interpersonal therapy treatment program may be beneficial for young people presenting with mild to moderate or “at risk of developing” anxiety and depressive disorders. Such programs may be relatively text heavy and we recommend their use particularly for young people with average to above average verbal skills. Completing such programs may also require a good amount of motivation from the young person and we suggest you regularly check in on their progress and provide encouragement and assistance if needed. Sometimes such programs can be used as an adjunct to therapy, rather than stand-alone treatment. Or can be used during the sessions to help with session structure and direction. How do I do it? Programs with a strong evidence base that focus on treating anxiety and/or depression are: E-couch http://ecouch.anu.edu.au/welcome Mood Gym http://www.moodgym.anu.edu.au/welcome Shyness Program http://www.shyness.tv These programs have all been developed in conjunction with Australian universities and are available for free. You may choose to work with a young person through a program like these during a session, or to ask them to complete it in their own time. We do recommend you check in to see how they’re finding the program as they may have issues or concerns related to it. We note that some young people struggle with the heavy text base of these programs and may need motivation and reinforcement to persist with it. Another option is to suggest a young person completes the program while on a waiting list at your practice. This would allow them to get an idea of some of the concepts discussed in session and may help to start the process of recovery. The ReachOutPro.com.au reviews of these programs can be viewed here [link] Page 12
  • 13. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice STEP-BY-STEP guide 1. Start by familiarising yourself with the program you intend to recommend. Type e-couch into your internet browser to find a link to this website. Alternatively type http://ecouch.anu.edu.au/welcome into your navigation bar. 2. You can choose to open an account or use the test account: Username: tess94 Password: ecouch 3. Once logged in, explore the programs available on the left hand side navigation bar including depression, anxiety and bereavement. Consider whether this may be appropriate for the young person you are treating. 4. If you decide this intervention may be appropriate we suggest you take the young person through the website in session initially and check in regularly about how they are progressing. They may find completing an online CBT program for example raises questions are issues that are appropriate for further discussion. 5. Check-in with the young person at each follow-up session about how the program is going. Quote - young person’s perspective “Go out and have a look at what’s available yourself so you know what it’s about and always keep it as a possibility. A website that young people can access confidentially and in their own time to find information or work through treatment programs like moodgym are invaluable, especially when someone says they don’t want to talk about it.” Kris Page 13
  • 14. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 5. To assist with monitoring of mental state How could this help my practice with young people? Most clinicians of various professional backgrounds will consider that the regular monitoring of mental state to be a crucial part of any treatment plan. As part of the natural cognitive development, some adolescents and young people may be limited in their capacity to reflect on changes, therefore reporting minimal change or inaccurate information. Accuracy of information is particularly relevant for those prescribing medications, as determining change in mental state will directly influence decisions to increase, stop, or change the medication the young person is receiving. In some cases, psychologists may ask the young person to complete a mood diary to both increase the capacity for reflection and to provide some better information on the young person’s mental state between sessions. Given young people’s preference for online or phone based interactions, utilising online mood monitors may be preferable to traditional pen and paper diaries. Several online mood monitors exist, have shown to be acceptable for users [8, 9] and are freely available to the public. There are also a number of iPhone applications that serve this purpose. One popular and highly used website is “Medhelp” (http://www.medhelp. org/). Medhelp provides mood “tracking” of the person’s mood over the week and provides a graph showing fluctuations over the monitoring time period. It also synchronises with iPhone applications for easy entry of information. The website and iPhone application also provide forums for users to ask questions and discuss problems, both with professionals and with peers. An alternative program is an application called “Moody Me”. “Moody Me” allows the user to record daily (or more often) moods based on smiley faces and has an option to take a photo to remind the person of what they were doing at the time. This can aid recall and be a great way to track rapid cycling moods or examine triggers over the course of the day. www.medhelp.org/ Page 14
  • 15. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice How do I do it? MEDHELP on-line 1. Sign up to Medhelp.org and familiarise yourself with the website. Alternatively, you can also use this a test account by entering the following details: Username: moodmonitor Password: f4k2x3 2. Add the Mood Tracker and Sleep Tracker applications. These provide graphs showing the entries for particular days and patterns across the week. 3. Spend some time entering data into these graphs to familiarise yourself with the process. To do this simply click on the date, then on the boxes associated with rankings and symptoms. 4. If you have access to an iPhone, download the “Moody Me” and “Sleep Cycle” applications, and try using them to enter your data and synchronise with your online account. 5. Via the website or the iPhone application, browse the user forums and see how people interact and support each other. 6. Before asking a young person to use the tools, make sure they have they appropriate resources and access (i.e. daily computer access and/or iPhone) 7. Take the young person through the page during a session and ask how they would feel about using it as opposed to keeping a written diary. 8. Show the young person the user forums - most young people are relieved to know there is a community of support and advice they can engage with and contribute to. 9. Indicate to the young person that they would need to sign up for their own account and that this would retain the privacy of all information they choose to add to it. Page 15
  • 16. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer with good processing speed [link to definition of processing speed] • Access to broadband internet connection • Internet access that facilitates access to external websites OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) • iPhone (if using applications) Knowledge • Basic competence in using websites • Basic competence in using iPhone applications Useful tips • Get the young person to set targets for how many times a day they will update their information, and discuss when / where they will do it. • Check the young person’s use of the site and utilise the information they provide during the next session. Page 16
  • 17. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “Another idea is to get the young person to do homework online or via email. For example if you are doing mood diaries or ABCs - or wanting them to monitor certain behaviours, then you could have them complete this online (if you have this set up) or to email it through the updated form each night, for example. Makes it a bit more fun!” Meke Page 17
  • 18. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 6. Encouraging community engagement and connection How could this help my practice with young people? Social isolation is a common experience of young people experiencing mental illness [10]. This is particularly salient in rural and marginalised populations and can be exacerbated in those young people experiencing emerging mood, behavioural and psychotic disorders. A number of Australian websites now exist with the aim to decrease the experience of isolation. These sites do this by providing an opportunity for young people to connect with others who are suffering with the same condition or who have recently recovered from similar difficulties. Many young people are assisted by the stories of peers and feel better understood by those who have had similar experiences. Recently, research has shown that the more a young person engages with an online community, the better their improvements [11, 12] . Another benefit of such websites is that they may provide an opportunity to feel part of a community, or a sense of belonging [13, 14]. During adolescence and early adulthood, the process of identity formation takes place. This can be a more challenging process for those with mental illness or social disadvantage. Connecting with a web-based community which aims to promote equality and justice can allow for the young person to connect with their own values and provide an opportunity to act in accordance with them. This can have a profound effect on their own sense of identity and meaning and can facilitate their recovery. How do I do it? STEP-BY-STEP guide 1. As with previous suggestions, we encourage you to use your clinical judgement as to the appropriateness of this intervention. Consider the benefits of a moderated forum over an unmoderated forum in terms of resilience, coping and social skills. 2. Explore the young person’s specific interests. 3. Provide several options or sites and talk through with the young person what they might be more interested in. If unsure, do a Google search with the young person. 4. Work through the website with the young person and help them to navigate. 5. Set expectations about site usage for outcomes. Encourage engagement with site. 6. Follow up in the next few sessions to get their feedback on the site and offer assistance if they need it. Page 18
  • 19. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer with good processing speed [link to definition of processing speed] • Access to broadband internet connection • Internet access that facilitates access to external websites OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) Knowledge • You don’t need to know anything about technology - ask the young person to show you • But you do need to be comfortable with asking the young person to show you • Knowledge of the sites prior to recommending it to the young person is encouraged Useful tips • Allow the young person to take you through the page • Follow-up the experience of the young person with the site in the next session As with all suggestions, we recommend you examine the website you might choose to recommend to the young person and be sure it is appropriate for them at that time. We also recommend you take time to take the young person through the site and be guided by their interests. Most young people are relieved to find access to peers with similar difficulties and are equally keen to assist others if they can. Page 19
  • 20. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “The internet has also been a great tool to assist others post-resolution for any issue that someone has experienced, a ‘final step’ if you will; you’ve gone online to find the initial answers, sought and completed the necessary actions to resolve an issue(s), and then gone back to utilizing these online resources in a ‘post-op’ type style ensuring that someone has received all of the help they need and that they’re better off for it.” Chris Page 20
  • 21. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 7. Using technology for wellness and relapse prevention. How could this help my practice with young people? All too often our work with young people tends to be problem or pathology oriented. Whilst this is often the most salient and urgent target, prevention interventions may be equally important. As a whole, the area of prevention has received little information in the online literature. Despite this, emerging evidence indicates that engagement with online tools can actually facilitate wellness [15] and prevent the development of mental illness [16-18]. The diversity of information and resources available on the internet means that there are many tools and articles that can assist with prevention. Encouraging young people to engage with technology, to utilise tools to monitor their own wellness, and seek information from credible sites can improve their self-management and prevention. How do I do it? This is a dot point checklist of the things you need to do before or things to remember when attempting to use the media in a session with a young person. Some things you might consider may be: 1. Do your research a. Know what sites are popular, what ones are useful, and what ones are helpful. b. Make sure you are aware of confidentiality constraints & risks by using the tool. c. Try the tools in a private space. 2. Introduce the idea of a management or wellness plan to the young person by explaining a. Why the plan is required. b. What is the purpose of the tool. 3. Demonstrate the tool with the young person. 4. Set parameters around use and guidelines. 5. Document plan. Page 21
  • 22. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer with good processing speed [link to definition of processing speed] • Access to broadband internet connection • Internet access that facilitates access to external websites OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) • iPhone (if using applications) Knowledge • Knowledge of websites and tools • Ability to judge the quality of information available. • Basic competence in using websites • Basic competence in using iPhone applications Useful tips • Get the young person to set targets for how many times a day they will update their information, and discuss when / where they will do it • Follow-up on use in the next session Page 22
  • 23. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “There’s so much scary stuff out there in terms of anorexia. When I’ve looked for anorexia help online I always find Pro-Ana stuff and it freaks me out. It’s also really unhelpful and can sometimes almost trigger me. I was a little unsure when my therapist suggested another website as I didn’t know what to expect. But Something-Fishy was great. I’ve developed online support and have people to turn to when it gets tough. I know that this is important as I’m always going to battle with anorexia. And if I can’t get hold of my therapist, I can turn to my online friends.” Sam Page 23
  • 24. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 8. Using social media for health promotion How could this help my practice with young people? The complete integration of technology into our lives provides more opportunities and ways to reach our intended audiences. With the advent of social networking in the form of Twitter, Facebook, MySpace and blogs, young people are able to communicate to a wide audience with one action – and do so on a regular basis. However, this technology and catchment is not limited to young people, and can present networking opportunities for those people working with young people too [19]. A recent study by Davies and Cranston (2008) highlighted several areas in which the social networking can provide opportunities for youth workers and their work. These areas included; 1. The promotion of organisational activities; 2. Recruitment of young people for projects; 3. Engagement with organisation through seeking the views of young people; 4. Keeping in contact through sending messages to young people; 5. Sharing of media. The ability to use social networking will vary depending on organisational structure and purpose but is likely to benefit any organisation that attempts to use it. Some organisations successfully using social networking in Australia are: • Youth Info Australia (@ACYS) • Salvation Army (@salvos) • Headspace (@headspace_aus) • ReachOut (@ ReachOut_AUS) • Lifeline (@LifelineAust) • NSW Centre for the Advancement of Adolescent Health How do I do it? Before embarking on the use of social networking, it is important to consider what your objectives of the communication are, and how best to meet these. Consideration of any legal and ethical issues is also required (see Part 4 for more information on these). In order to utilise social networking we recommend the following steps; 1. Check your organisational policy around social communication. 2. Define your objectives of the communication – is it for contact, a reminder, event promotion, raising awareness of an issue, etc.? 3. Decide on the appropriate forum for the communication – is it Twitter, Facebook, or another site. 4. Create an account with the site if the organisation does not already have one. 5. Post your message. 6. Follow-up on any communication generated from this. Page 24
  • 25. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice What resources do I need? Infrastructure • A computer • Access to broadband internet connection • Internet access that facilitates access to external websites OR • Alternative connection device such as an iPhone or iPad (either yours or theirs) • iPhone (if using applications) Knowledge • Knowledge of websites and tools • Basic competence in using websites • Basic competence in using iPhone applications Useful tips • Always check organisational guidelines about social networking Page 25
  • 26. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice Quote - young person’s perspective “As the competition progressed I actually helped a friend confront depression, anxiety and drugs problems that he has had for years, and he is back on track to getting better and going to university. It’s funny how things can pan out sometimes.” Page 26
  • 27. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice References 1. Barney, L.J., K.M. Griffiths, and M. Banfield, Information Needs of People with Depression: An Investigation of Queries and Problems Reported on an Online Support-Group Forum, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australi. p. 45. 2. Griffiths, K.M., L. Farrer, and H. Christensen, The efficacy of internet interventions for depression and anxiety disorders: a review of randomised controlled trials. Med J Aust, 2010. 192(11 Suppl): p. S4-11. 3. Griffiths, K.M. and H. Christensen, Internet-based mental health programs: a powerful tool in the rural medical kit. Aust J Rural Health, 2007. 15(2): p. 81-7. 4. Christensen, H., et al., Community-based prevention programs for anxiety and depression in youth: a systematic review. J Prim Prev, 2010. 31(3): p. 139-70. 5. Calear, A.L. and H. Christensen, Systematic review of school-based prevention and early intervention programs for depression. J Adolesc, 2010. 33(3): p. 429-38. 6. Calear, A.L. and H. Christensen, Review of internet-based prevention and treatment programs for anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. Med J Aust, 2010. 192(11 Suppl): p. S12-4. 7. Cunningham, M.J., et al., The Cool Teens CD-ROM for anxiety disorders in adolescents : a pilot case series. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry, 2009. 18(2): p. 125-9. 8. Proudfoot, J., et al. Web-enabled Mobile Phone Program for Monitoring and Managing Mild to Moderate Depression, Anxiety and Stress. in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011. Sydney, Australia. 9. Reid, S.C., et al. Using mobile phones to detect, treat, and manage adolescent mental health: A randomised controlled trial of the mobiletype program in rural and metro primary care. in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011. Sydney, Australia. 10. SANE Australia, SANE Research Report 1: Mental illness and social isolation. 2005, SANE Australia: Victoria, Melbourne. 11. Barak, A., Causal Relationships Between Level of Engagement in Online Support Groups and Participants’ Outcomes, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 19. 12. Trockel, M.T., et al. Does a Moderated Online Discussion Group Help? A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-Based Intervention for College Women at Risk for Eating Disorder Onset. in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011. Sydney, Australia. 13. Metcalf, A., J. Stephens-Reicher, and P. Collins, ReachOut.com National Survey 2010. 2010. 14. Griffiths, K.M., et al., The 6 and 12-month effectiveness of a peer-to-peer depression Internet Support Group, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 27. 15. Schueller, S.M. and A.C. Parks, Disseminating Self-Help: Positive Psychology Exercises in an Online Trial, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 37. 16. Christensen, H., et al., Preventing anxiety and depression: the results from an indicated RCT (community sample in Australia) and a selective RCT (Medical trainees in USA, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 23. Page 27
  • 28. ReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 3 Technology in practice 17. Lintvedt, O.K., et al., Evaluating the effectiveness and efficacy of an Internet-based self- help intervention for the prevention of depression: A randomised controlled trial., in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 31. 18. Taylor, C.B., et al., Internet Delivered Universal and Targeted Healthy Weight Regulation/ body image and Eating Disorder Prevention Programs for High School Students, in The International Society for Research in Internet Interventions: The 5th Annual Researchers Meeting. 2011: Sydney, Australia. p. 38. 19. Davies, T. and P. Cranston. Youth Work and Social Networking: Interim Report. 2008 [cited 2011 4th April, 2011]; Available from: http://www.gallomanor.com/files/GFSR.pdf. Page 28