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Reach Out Pro Module - Connecting Our Worlds ...

Reach Out Pro Module - Connecting Our Worlds
Part 2

This document is designed to give you a basic overview of some of the popular programs, sites and technologies in use by young people. This overview is intended to give you a flavour of the technologies, but is not intended as a complete guide to the programs.

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    Part 2 - Notes Part 2 - Notes Document Transcript

    • Part 2 -Learning thelanguage oftechnologyConnecting our worldsReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module Part 2- Learning the language of technology The following part is designed to give you a basic overview of some of the popular programs, sites and technologies in use by young people. This overview is intended to give you a flavour of the technologies, but is not intended as a complete guide to the programs. Learning Objectives: • To develop a basic understanding of concepts and language associated with information communication technologies (ICT) used by young people. • To develop familiarity with some of the main online resources that young people use. • Practical exercises/ suggestions on how to start a blog, Twitter or join Facebook. Before using each technology, it is important to consider how this technology might best suit you and your work with young people. As the evidence supporting the use of technology is still emerging - it’s important to use good clinical and ethical judgement when using technology with young people. We also recommend reading Part 4 which outlines risks and considerations for keeping yourself and your clients safe. Page 2
    • Part 2 -Facebook Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? Facebook (www.Facebook.com) is an online networking site where users may create a personal profile, with which they add other users as friends, exchange private messages, photos, links, and can receive automatic notifications when their friends update their own profiles. Additionally, users may join common interest user groups, such as those organised by workplace, school or college, or other interests [1]. Users are able to vary the level of privacy of their profile so that the range of information offered to others can vary from very little on high privacy settings, to being able to see all the information posted when privacy settings are low. How young people use it • Keeping up to date with friends, organisations & campaigns • Organising and sharing events • Sharing links, news, photos, videos etc. • Commenting on status updates, news, photos, videos and activities • Starting discussions on topics of interest • Creating groups of common interest Icon Home page Page 4
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would using Facebook add value to my work with young people? As a part of one-on-one work with a young person, they may allow you to view their profile as part of a sharing exercise if they are not comfortable opening up to you initially (see Part 3 of this module). Creating an organisation profile allows you to share helpful information, articles & tools with a broad range of young people in the space where they are spending time online. You might also use it to facilitate online discussions on mental health or youth issues, for which an online forum provides a relaxed, non-confrontational environment in which to participate and share their thoughts with peers. Additionally, creating an online group may also mean that online resources and media can be shared and commented on. By encouraging young people to actively participate you can enhance their self-efficacy and empowerment. If considering using social networking to engage with young people, it may be useful to refer to part four of this module in which we refer to a set of guidelines for establishing professional barriers around the use of social media Exercise: Set up your own Facebook page Online social media & news blog Mashable has compiled an excellent guide book for Facebook, from basics to advanced use. You can check it out here: http://mashable.com/guidebook/Facebook/ 1. Read Part 4 about safety and privacy online. 2. Set up your own Facebook account at http://www.Facebook.com/. Use the suggested guide book from Mashable if needed. 3. Review your privacy settings and set these to the level of privacy you desire. These settings can be found under account on the top right hand side of your Facebook page. 4. See if any of your friends or colleagues are using Facebook, and add them as ‘friends’. 5. Search for and review some Facebook pages, such as ReachOut.com or ReachOutPro.com.au 6. Share your experiences in the comments section of this part. Page 5
    • Part 2 -Twitter Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? Twitter is a microblogging and information network used by individuals and organisations to provide short updates to those connected to them, also known as “followers”. Updates range in content and can only be up to 140 characters in length. Unlike other networking sites, Twitter allows the user to communicate with a number of others who they may not personally know. It is commonly used by celebrities to communicate with a large number of fans or “followers”. The brief 140 character communique known as “tweets” can vary from personal updates about mood or actions, to specific comments or alerts from an organisation. In addition to updates, a tweet can be directed at specific topics using the “#” or hashtag. The hashtag can be used to highlight key words or topics. Clicking on a hashtagged word will take you through to any other tweets on that topic. If the tweet includes a username prefaced with the @ sign, the tweet will appear in the user’s feed. For example, any @ReachOut_AUS tweets will appear on the ReachOut.com Australia’s homepage. How do young people use Twitter? Twitter provides a platform for communicating to many people at once in a way that is simple and instant. Most young people would use Twitter to express their current concerns, moods, news or pleasant events. Young people may also choose to “follow” friends, celebrities or organisations that they have an interest in. “Following” on Twitter allows the user to receive the “tweets” or updates of others. Users can also respond to tweets, either privately by adding Direct Message (d) to their tweet, or publicly by adding an @username before their comment. This provides a social interaction with those they follow. Icon Home page Page 7
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? Having a Twitter account would allow you to follow organisations or individuals that are relevant to your work, such as: @ReachOut_AUS - updates from the ReachOut.com service for young people @Inspire_AUS - updates from the Inspire Foundation, the organisation behind ReachOut.com @yawcrc – updates from the new Cooperative Research Centre for Young People, Technology and Wellbeing @BlossomProject - Supporting girls 16-25 with anxiety or depression to reach their full potential @headspace_aus - Australia’s National Youth Mental Health Foundation @ACYS_youthinfo - Updates on research & events relevant to the Youth Sector from the Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies Following a user’s tweets’ you can learn more about what events are coming up. You can also use Twitter to seek more information. For example, you could gain information by tweeting “@ReachOut_AUS This is really great information, do you have any more resources to share?” or “@ReachOut_AUS that link about suicide made me realise my friend might be at risk. Is there someone I can talk to?” For “tweets” or users, that are more relevant to your work, you can search for hashtags i.e. #mentalhealth As an organisation you could use Twitter to provide short updates on news, events and research to any individual or other organisation wanting to follow your account. Followers might include young people currently associated with your practice, staff, or others who may be interested in supporting your organisation. Unless an individual or organisation sets up a locked profile, it is important to remember that anyone can follow the account. There is no way of limiting this to a subset of individuals and so the decision to tweet needs to be made with this in mind. If considering using twitter to engage with young people, it may be useful to refer to part four of this module in which we refer to a set of guidelines for establishing professional barriers around the use of social media. Exercise: Setting up your own Twitter account Twitter has published a great guide to help you get started on Twitter. This can be found here (http://support.twitter.com/groups/31-twitter-basics). 1. Set up your own Twitter account as per instructions above. 2. Have a go at “following” some of the accounts mentioned. 3. Share your experiences in the comments section of this module. Page 8
    • Part 2 -Yahoo! Answers Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? Yahoo! Answers is an online forum where people can post, answer or browse questions on any topic. Once posted, questions are open to be answered by anyone for up to 4 days. As the person who posts the question, you can pick the best answer, or let the community vote on the best answer. The person who provides the best answer is given points, which help them to achieve levels - showing how active and reliable they are at answering questions usefully. How do young people use Yahoo! Answers? When young people have a question, the first place they will generally look for answers is online. Yahoo! Answers often show up in search results, and many young people go straight to the website to ask or browse questions. The voting system in Yahoo! Answers allows them to get a variety of answers to a question, and see which answers are supported by their peers online - helping them to cut through the clutter and get to an answer that will be useful. Icon Home page Page 10
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? Using and reviewing the postings on Yahoo! Answers will help to give you a good understanding of how young people search for information, and of the information they are seeking. This can help you understand what you need to address in sessions with your clients. As part of your work with young people, you may also consider providing answers to young people’s questions online via Yahoo! Answers. If you do choose to do this, it’s important to be aware that your answer will be available to not only the person that posed the question, but anyone else that searches for a similar topic. Many young people will search online for answers long before they are comfortable talking to a professional. It is also important to utilise professional judgement and only answer questions within your areas of expertise and competency. Answer all questions with caution and ensure you consider the impact of the information you are providing. Exercise: Responding to Questions on Yahoo! Answers. You can watch a brief video tutorial of how to use the site here: http://www.butterscotch.com/tutorial/How-To-Use-Yahoo-Answers Note: You will need to sign in to do this exercise. If you have a Facebook, Yahoo! or Google account you will be able to sign in by clicking the Sign In link at the top right hand corner of the page. If you do not have an account, click the Sign Up link in the same corner of the page. 1. Go to http://au.answers.yahoo.com. 2. Click the Answer button at the top of the page. 3. Under Categories select Health. 4. In the box above the questions listed, select Mental Health. 5. Have a go at answering some questions, and voting on answers provided by other people. 6. Share your experiences in the comments section of this module. Page 11
    • Part 2 -Blog Sites Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? Blogs are websites where one or many users publish articles and opinion pieces on a regular basis, on a specific topic, or a range of topics. Personal, collaborative (multiple authors) and organisational blogs all exist in the online sphere. Blogs can usually be subscribed to via RSS so that followers get updates when they post an article. How are young people using Blogs? Blogs are used by people across many demographics, as a way of finding information in an area of interest and engaging in discussion about it. As someone writing for a blog, it provides a forum to post your articles around an area of interest or work. Quite often blogs are used for emotional expression of difficulties or to gain support from a wider community of peers. Other people’s blogs provide an excellent space to find information on a specific topic, and to express opinions and facilitate discussion. Icon Wordpress Home page Page 13
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? As a professional practitioner, blogs provide an accessible space to find, follow and contribute to excellent sources of information about your profession. They provide a space in which to engage both young people and other professionals in discussion. However, like any source of information, if you are using blogs to inform your practice it’s important to assess the source of information for its quality and usefulness. In your work with young people, you might ask them if they follow any blogs and ask them to show you, as a way of discovering more about their interests. Alternatively, they may have their own blog on sites such as Tumblr. Such sites are a great source of information and provide insight into the young person’s online persona. A great place to start looking for blogs to read is Technorati - a search engine for finding blogs & blog posts in your area of interest. Technorati also creates & posts original content on a wide range of issues, written by member bloggers. The site also tracks & highlights what is / isn’t popular among online blogs. Visit: http://www.technorati.com/ Potential blog sites to review include; • Tumblr - http://www.tumblr.com/ • Wordpress - http://wordpress.org/ • Blogger – http://www.blogger.com/ Exercise: Getting to know blogs If you wish to start experimenting with your own blog, Google have provided a step by step guide to starting up a blog and posting your first article here: http://www.google.com/support/blogger/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=112498 1. Go to http://www.technorati.com/. 2. Search for posts or articles in an area of interest. 3. Spend some time reading the content on various blogs. See if you can identify one that you would like to follow. 4. Share your experiences in the comments section of this part. Page 14
    • Part 2 -Flickr Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? Flickr is a photo sharing network, where users can upload their photos, share them under a variety of topics or categories, and share them with friends easily. You can also comment on images and have conversations about them. How are young people using Flickr? • Sharing photos with friends quickly and easily • Sharing photos with the public and creating professional portfolios • Finding, sharing and discussing photos, out of general interest Icon Home page Page 16
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? As a professional practitioner, you can use images to find out more about a young person by asking if they use Flickr and if they would be willing to show you some of their pictures. For many young people, photography provides a form of expression, and Flickr provides a forum for sharing that expression with others - thus it can be a valuable tool. The ability to discuss images allows young people to get feedback from others - validating self-expression. Because it is simple to upload videos from mobile phones using Flickr, it could also be used as a way of sharing images of life events and problems as they happen, both helping the young person to keep track, and providing a topic of discussion for the next support session. Young people can upload the photos throughout the week and then discuss them in session at their next appointment. Exercise: Set up a Flickr account 1. Set up a Flickr account, by clicking the Sign Up button on the front page of the website, or by following the steps in the video guide at http://youtu.be/zzNf0n65ro0. 2. Browse some of the images online by using the search bar in the top right hand corner of the screen. Observe how people discuss and contribute to photos. 3. Try uploading some of your own images, by clicking on the Upload link at the top of the page, and following the site instructions. 4. Share your experiences in the comments section of this part. Page 17
    • Part 2 -YouTube Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? YouTube is a video sharing website and social network. Via this site, you can upload originally created videos with captions, and share them with friends & the public. YouTube allows you to embed your video in other pages, allowing videos to be shared very easily on websites, social networks, blogs etc. On these sites users can also create personal profiles or channels for other people to find out more about them and follow their latest videos. How are young people using YouTube? Many people use Youtube or similar sites to simply share video with friends, colleagues & the broader public. Because videos can be commented and voted on, they can get feedback and approval from people around the world, and get recognition from it. Many young people also post Vlogs [video-blogs], which are video updates where they talk about their lives and things they care about. Icon Home page Page 19
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? Video allows for creative expression of stories to a broad range of people, in a way that is much more accessible than text. Young people can create video content as a way of expressing their stories, learning creative new skills, and getting positive feedback and validation / recognition from their peers. For example, Reach Out TV provides space for young people to upload and share their stories and personal contributions with their peers. This provides valuable stories to connect with for young people who feel alone, as well as a forum for self-expression. Asking the young person to show you videos that demonstrate how they feel can be helpful for rapport building. Alternatively, using videos for psycho-education can provide an alternative to traditional face to face methods. Organisations and individuals use YouTube or similar sites to run creative video campaigns, either as stand alone videos, or where people contribute their own videos. YouTube or Vimeo can also be used for uploading videos for promoting your organisation and / or embedding in your website. Exercise: Learning to use YouTube 1. Check out some of the videos and stories at Reach Out TV http://au.reachout.com/rotv. 2. Go to http://youtube.com/ and check out some of the videos, perhaps by searching for a topic of interest in the search bar at the top of the page, or clicking the Browse button next to the search bar to browse by category. 3. Share your experiences in the comments section of this part. If your organisation does not allow access to YouTube, you may be able to access Vimeo (http://www.vimeo.com/) Page 20
    • Part 2 -Serious Games Part 2. Learning the language of technology
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What is it? A serious game is a term used to refer to software or hardware applications developed with game technology but designed with the primary purpose of learning rather than pure entertainment. In simple terms, it refers to technology-mediated learning. Serious games are designed with the intention of improving some specific aspect of learning and players come to serious games with that expectation. Serious games are used in emergency services training, in military training, in corporate education, in health care and in many other sectors of society. They can also be found at every level of education. Why use it? Serious games offer the same level of engagement that video games and other online games offer, with the added benefit of developing life and coping skills. Games provide a safe place for users to learn without being penalised or stigmatised. There is also low physical risks to the user. It is a great way to try different approaches to reach people in a safe, secure environment and to provide an alternative means of delivering a message and building skills. Serious games intended for health aim to prevent illness, promote healthy behaviours or provide early intervention [3]. It is still a new and emerging area in research and practice and it is only within the last decade that game development has taken off and effectiveness evaluations conducted. However, there is growing evidence that serious games can lead to positive outcomes for health and wellbeing by providing opportunities for engagement, skill building and motivation for behavioural change [3-5]. ReachOutCentral Home page Page 22
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module How would this add value to my work with young people? Using a serious game may help engage young people who are reluctant to attend face to face sessions or those that struggle with interviews. Alternatively, it provides a between session activity to reinforce messages learned in session. The serious game Reach Out Central (aka ROC – http://www.reachoutcentral.com.au/) was developed to improve the mental health and wellbeing of young people, particularly young men, by increasing their problem solving, help-seeking and communication skills. It allows young people to explore how their thinking, behaviour and choices influence their mental health. It is unique in being the only mental health serious game in Australia available online [6]. There are numerous opportunities to use serious games to influence clinical outcomes for young people. These can include: • Making serious games such as Reach Out Central (www.reachoutcentral.com.au) available to young people in waiting rooms or prior to their first session can help to reduce anxiety and makes for a great conversation starter. • For young people who are on a waiting list to see a clinician, using a serious game such as ROC during that time can improve wellbeing, reducing the intensity and frequency of intervention required face to face. • During a consultation, a serious game can be used to break the ice, promote engagement and facilitate conversation. Working side by side on a game can be less confronting for some young people and can provide an opportunity for them to discuss sensitive issues by externalising them temporarily to the characters in the game. • Following a consultation, setting tasks in serious games as homework can provide an opportunity for young people to practice the skills and strategies explored during the sessions in a safe and anonymous environment. • Finally for those young people leaving clinical care, serious games can be used to assist in the maintenance of wellbeing. For example, games like ROC allow you to track progress and improvement over time. This may signal to a young person when they need to reconnect with face to face support or clinical care. • You may have found serious games helpful in other ways. We’d love to hear your stories below. Exercise: Playing seriously 1. Visit www.reachoutcentral.com.au and enter as a guest. 2. Play the game, answering the prompt questions as a young person. 3. Having looked at the scenarios, come back and add your comments to this part around how you can see this benefiting young people. Page 23
    • Part 2. Learning the language of technologyReachOutPro.com.au Educational Module What next? Now that you have learned about common programs, sites and tools that young people use, why not learn some more about how to integrate this into your work? Part 3 of this module provides you with some guidance on how to build technology into your consultations with young people while Part 4 helps you manage the professional issues that may arise. 1. Wikipedia. Facebook. 2011 [cited 2011 6th April, 2011]; Available from: http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook. 2. Lenhart, A. Teens, Cell Phones and Texting. 2010 [cited 2011 April 4th, 2011]; Available from: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1572/teens-cell-phones-text-messages. 3. Baranowski, T., et al., Playing for real: video games and stories for health-related behavior change. Am J Prev Med, 2008. 34(1): p. 74-82. 4. UN News Centre. ‘Food Force’ video game sweeps northern Europe. 2007; Available from: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=22564. 5. Beale, I.L., et al., Improvement in cancer-related knowledge following use of a psychoeducational video game for adolescents and young adults with cancer. J Adolesc Health, 2007. 41(3): p. 263-70. 6. Burns, J.M., et al., Reach Out Central: a serious game designed to engage young men to improve mental health and wellbeing. Med J Aust, 2010. 192(11 Suppl): p. S27-30 Page 24