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Defining public transport routes for tod 8 october 2013 daisy dwango
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Defining public transport routes for tod 8 october 2013 daisy dwango

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  • 1. Workshop on Implementation of Transit Oriented Development Transport Month 2013 1
  • 2.  Introduction  Transport overview  Transport StrategicThrusts  Public transport corridors  Conclusion 2
  • 3.  City is required to develop ITP by NLTA Act 5 of 2009  GDS 2040 and National Development Plan  First ITP developed in 2003 served over 10years  ITP 2003-2008 proposed SPTN later BRT network  Currently under review in four components  First component is the SITPF was adopted by Mayoral Committee in September 2013  SITPF sets out the vision, goals and strategies to meet objectives of GDS 2040  The SITPF proposes strategic thrusts and high level PT corridors to guideTOD 3
  • 4.  Modal split: 2002GHTS  53% car trips  47% public transport trips  Trips to work: 2011 GCRO QoL survey  42% used cars to work  Poor public transport leads to more car use despite high levels of congestion  Congestion increased travel times by 79% in the morning peak-TomTom Congestion Index 2012 -  2011 survey estimated that 78% of 3.8 million drivers on Joburg roads are stuck in severe traffic jam daily  Carbon emissions: 56% is contribution of Joburg to national carbon emissions
  • 5. 1: Restructure and integrate the city 2: Improve and expand provision of quality public transport and use of non- motorised transport 3: Maintain, improve, extend and integrate transport infrastructure 4: Support economic growth through improving freight mobility 5: Manage congestion, travel demand and parking 6: Actively engage citizenry in improving the transport system 7:Transform the transport sector and encourage new, efficient and profitable transport enterprises and employment creation 8: Plan and regulate the transport system 9: Resource and finance the transport plan 5
  • 6.  Defined the public transport corridors “Corridors of Freedom”  Identify and map the whole network and assign the most appropriate mode for the demand.  Implement over time identified public transport networks with the next five year focus on the ReaVaya 1B and 1C corridors  Develop integrated transport hubs and improve the surrounding public environment, in particular the pedestrian and cycling environment  Incentivise spatial restructuring including through the way in which public transport fares are structured SSHUP proposed corridors 6
  • 7. WHAT CAN WE EXPECT IN 2040?  The city population is expected to increase from 4.43 million in 2011 to 6.57 million in 2040.  Density per km2 will increase from 2 698 (2011) to 3 996.  Significant increases in employment by 2040 especially in  Lanseria (160 000)  Modderfontein(132 000)  Lion Park (65 000)  Athol, Rosebank & Parktown North, Sandton (60 000 each)  Midrand Strip (46 000)  Buccleuch (45 000)  Parkmore, Houghton Estate, Jhb CBD, Limbro park, Islamic Institute (30 000 – 45 000 each)  Halfway Gardens, RandburgCBD, Austin View,Troyeville, Cosmo, Roodepoort, Benrose, Midrand-Noordwyk, Fordsburg (15 000 – 30 000 each) WHAT WILLTHIS MEAN FOR TRANSPORT DEMAND  If we assume:  Density andTOD reduces average trip length to 19km.  65% public transport due to huge new developments on ReaVaya corridors (1A, B and C)  Then the public transport morning peak hour demand is predicted to double from 298 000 trips in 2010 to 617 000 trips in 2040  And if these trips are assigned to the transport network, the next pages set out proposed new services for 2040
  • 8. Top Eight 9000 to 12000 pphpd Highest vol on route (pphpd) in Year 2040 Appropriate Mode (potentially or planned already) 22 Soweto via Noordgesig and Fairlands - Randburg 12000 New Rea Vaya BRT 2 Soweto to CBD via Perth 11000 Rea Vaya Phase 1B (already built) Metrorail 5 plus 11 combined CBD-Wynberg – Midrand (plus links to Ivory Park and Alexandra) 11000 Rea Vaya Phase 1C 13 CBD-Sandton- Sunninghill via Oxford 10000 Rea Vaya Phase 1C Gautrain 1 Soweto to CBD via Soweto Highway 9500 Existing Rea Vaya Phase 1A Metrorail 3 Soweto (Baragwanath) via Koma Street to Roodepoort 9000 New Rea Vaya BRT 9 Alexandra- Greenstone-Ivory Park 9000 Rea Vaya Phase 1C Stretford-CBD corridor, incorporating Routes 16, 18 and 19, plus flows from Sedibeng *Total corridor volumes of 14 700 in places Upgraded Rail from Stretford Germiston-CBD corridor, incorporating Routes 20 and 21 if rail is preferred mode for these routes **Total corridor volume will exceed 10 000 Upgraded Rail
  • 9. STRATEGY  The next step in the ITP process is to develop an IntegratedTransport Network Plan to determine:  the best mode for the routes  the public transport, NMT and freight routes the City will be investing in;  A 10-year sequenced plan indicating funding requirements.  Such a plan will be guided by:  the strategies set out in this document,  international best practice on what is the correct mode for the level of demand  the specific routes, travel speed, image for the city, attractiveness to car users, passenger preference, comfort and the convenience of a particular mode. GUIDING PRINCIPLES  For public transport  15 or 18-seater minibus: one-way passenger volumes of less than 800 passengers/day.  Standard bus: Between 800 and 20 000 one way passengers/day.  Articulated bus: Between 20 000 and 40 000 one-way passengers/day.  Rail: Above 40 000 one-way passengers/day  For walking and cycling:  Distances of 500 m to 1 km as representing a fair walking distance  Reasonable trip times are 30 minutes to jobs/school and 10 to 15 minutes for trips to shops or services 9
  • 10. END THANKYOU 10