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Partnering with community colleges gwi 2012 (2)

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Partnering with community colleges gwi 2012 (2)

Partnering with community colleges gwi 2012 (2)

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  • 1. Partnering with Community Colleges Partnering with Community Colleges Dr. Fay M. ButlerDr. Fay M. Butler Director of Student EngagementDirector of Student Engagement LaGuardia Community ColleLaGuardia Community College
  • 2. Partnering with Community Colleges • There are three Proposed Workshop outcomes/objectives • The first objective is to review the role of the community college in the current higher education landscape, including a brief review of history. • The second objective is to gain an understanding of the critical nature of the importance of partnering with Community Colleges by creating clear pathways. • The third Objective to is think of the future/ Next Steps. Partnering with Community Colleges • There are three Proposed Workshop outcomes/objectives • The first objective is to review the role of the community college in the current higher education landscape, including a brief review of history. • The second objective is to gain an understanding of the critical nature of the importance of partnering with Community Colleges by creating clear pathways. • The third Objective to is think of the future/ Next Steps.
  • 3. Partnering with Community Colleges I. The Community College in the Higher Education Landscape- Brief Review of History of the Community College II. The Community College in the Higher Education Landscape- Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges- II. Providing Pathways for Community College Students III. Recommendations/ Brief exercise Partnering with Community Colleges I. The Community College in the Higher Education Landscape- Brief Review of History of the Community College II. The Community College in the Higher Education Landscape- Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges- II. Providing Pathways for Community College Students III. Recommendations/ Brief exercise
  • 4. The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History • Founded in 1901, Joliet Junior College in Illinois is the oldest existing public two-year college. In the early years, the colleges focused on general liberal arts studies. • During the Depression of the 1930s, community colleges began offering job-training programs as a way of easing widespread unemployment. After World War II, the conversion of military industries to consumer goods created new, skilled jobs. . The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History • Founded in 1901, Joliet Junior College in Illinois is the oldest existing public two-year college. In the early years, the colleges focused on general liberal arts studies. • During the Depression of the 1930s, community colleges began offering job-training programs as a way of easing widespread unemployment. After World War II, the conversion of military industries to consumer goods created new, skilled jobs. .
  • 5. The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History This economic transformation along with the GI Bill created the drive for more higher education options. In 1948, the Truman Commission suggested the creation of a network of public, community-based colleges to serve local needs. . The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History This economic transformation along with the GI Bill created the drive for more higher education options. In 1948, the Truman Commission suggested the creation of a network of public, community-based colleges to serve local needs. .
  • 6. The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History • Community colleges became a national network in the 1960s with the opening of 457 public community colleges - more than the total in existence before that decade. •The construction involved in this gigantic growth of facilities was funded by a robust economy and supported by the social activism of the time. The number of community colleges has steadily grown since the 1960s. At present, there are 1,166 community colleges in the United States. When the branch campuses of community colleges are included, the number totals about 1,600. . The Community Colleges in the Higher Education Landscape: Brief Review and History • Community colleges became a national network in the 1960s with the opening of 457 public community colleges - more than the total in existence before that decade. •The construction involved in this gigantic growth of facilities was funded by a robust economy and supported by the social activism of the time. The number of community colleges has steadily grown since the 1960s. At present, there are 1,166 community colleges in the United States. When the branch campuses of community colleges are included, the number totals about 1,600. .
  • 7. The Community Colleges in Higher Education: Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges (adapted from the College Board) The College Board Report listed six reasons. 1. Community Colleges are the largest postsecondary education segment and its share of the undergraduate population likely to increase. . The Community Colleges in Higher Education: Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges (adapted from the College Board) The College Board Report listed six reasons. 1. Community Colleges are the largest postsecondary education segment and its share of the undergraduate population likely to increase. .
  • 8. The Community Colleges in Higher Education: Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges adapted from the College Board They serve almost half of the undergraduate students in the United States, providing open access to postsecondary education, preparing students for transfer to 4-year institutions, providing workforce development and skills training, and offering noncredit programs ranging from English as a second language to skills retraining to community enrichment programs or cultural activities.(AACC, 2006) The Community Colleges in Higher Education: Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges adapted from the College Board They serve almost half of the undergraduate students in the United States, providing open access to postsecondary education, preparing students for transfer to 4-year institutions, providing workforce development and skills training, and offering noncredit programs ranging from English as a second language to skills retraining to community enrichment programs or cultural activities.(AACC, 2006)
  • 9. 2. Community College Students want to transfer Transfer has been and continues to be a popular goal for a large proportion of incoming community college students. Surveys indicate that at least 50 percent and perhaps as many as 80 percent of all incoming community college students seek to transfer and earn a bachelor’s degree. 2. Community College Students want to transfer Transfer has been and continues to be a popular goal for a large proportion of incoming community college students. Surveys indicate that at least 50 percent and perhaps as many as 80 percent of all incoming community college students seek to transfer and earn a bachelor’s degree.
  • 10. 2. Community College students want to transfer Many students who intend to earn sub baccalaureate credentials at a community college often increase their educational aspirations after starting at a two year college. (College Board,2011) 2. Community College students want to transfer Many students who intend to earn sub baccalaureate credentials at a community college often increase their educational aspirations after starting at a two year college. (College Board,2011)
  • 11. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 3. Community Colleges will prepare more students for transfer in the future, especially students from middle class background The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) estimates that between 2007 and 2009, the number of full-time students enrolled in community colleges grew 24 percent and, as noted above, significant overall growth in Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 3. Community Colleges will prepare more students for transfer in the future, especially students from middle class background The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) estimates that between 2007 and 2009, the number of full-time students enrolled in community colleges grew 24 percent and, as noted above, significant overall growth in
  • 12. 3. Community Colleges will prepare more students for transfer in the future, especially students from middle class background community college enrollment has been fueled largely by traditional-age students (18–24 years). Traditional-age students attending full time are far more likely than other students to have transfer and the bachelor’s degree as a goal. 3. Community Colleges will prepare more students for transfer in the future, especially students from middle class background community college enrollment has been fueled largely by traditional-age students (18–24 years). Traditional-age students attending full time are far more likely than other students to have transfer and the bachelor’s degree as a goal.
  • 13. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 4. Community colleges attract students from underserved groups in greater numbers than four year colleges and universities •Nearly half of all undergraduates, and more than 50 percent of all Black and Latino students attend community colleges (American Association of Community Colleges, AACC, 2006) Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 4. Community colleges attract students from underserved groups in greater numbers than four year colleges and universities •Nearly half of all undergraduates, and more than 50 percent of all Black and Latino students attend community colleges (American Association of Community Colleges, AACC, 2006)
  • 14. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 4. Community colleges attract students from underserved groups in greater numbers than four year colleges and universities. Traditionally, our community colleges have been critical portals of entry to higher education for underserved students. They enroll high proportions of Black, Latino and Native American Students and high proportions of students from lower income and working class families. (Rhoades, 2012) Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 4. Community colleges attract students from underserved groups in greater numbers than four year colleges and universities. Traditionally, our community colleges have been critical portals of entry to higher education for underserved students. They enroll high proportions of Black, Latino and Native American Students and high proportions of students from lower income and working class families. (Rhoades, 2012)
  • 15. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 5. Community colleges cost less to attend than four-year institutions The cheaper price tag is very attractive to many students. According to data compiled by the College Board and AACC, tuition and fees at community colleges average only 36.2 percent of the average four- year public college tuition and fee bill. (College Board) Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 5. Community colleges cost less to attend than four-year institutions The cheaper price tag is very attractive to many students. According to data compiled by the College Board and AACC, tuition and fees at community colleges average only 36.2 percent of the average four- year public college tuition and fee bill. (College Board)
  • 16. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 6. Community colleges are more accessible than four- year institutions Twenty-nine percent of community colleges are located in cities, 24 percent in towns and 18 percent in rural areas. In a recent survey of students, proximity was a major reason why they selected one school over another. (College Board, 2011) Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued 6. Community colleges are more accessible than four- year institutions Twenty-nine percent of community colleges are located in cities, 24 percent in towns and 18 percent in rural areas. In a recent survey of students, proximity was a major reason why they selected one school over another. (College Board, 2011)
  • 17. Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued Summary • Community Colleges enroll at least half of the undergraduate students, especially underserved students. • Community College students indicate that they want to transfer • NEXT- Providing Pathways Reasons to Partner with Community Colleges continued Summary • Community Colleges enroll at least half of the undergraduate students, especially underserved students. • Community College students indicate that they want to transfer • NEXT- Providing Pathways
  • 18. Providing Pathways for Community College Students-Four ways • Making a Commitment to Community College students • Outreach to Community College Students • Admitting Community College students • Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture Providing Pathways for Community College Students-Four ways • Making a Commitment to Community College students • Outreach to Community College Students • Admitting Community College students • Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture
  • 19. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Making a commitment to Community College students The higher education leaders interviewed for the College Board Community College Project stressed that “a serious commitment to enroll and serve transfer students from community colleges cannot be a separate initiative, parked along a sidetrack, while the institution fulfills its mission on the main line”. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Making a commitment to Community College students The higher education leaders interviewed for the College Board Community College Project stressed that “a serious commitment to enroll and serve transfer students from community colleges cannot be a separate initiative, parked along a sidetrack, while the institution fulfills its mission on the main line”.
  • 20. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Making a commitment to Community College students They also stressed that the institution must value transfer students by including them as part of its strategic enrollment plan. If a four-year college or university does not foster an institution-wide appreciation of transfer students as full-fledged members of the campus community, their presence serves neither the student nor the institution well. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Making a commitment to Community College students They also stressed that the institution must value transfer students by including them as part of its strategic enrollment plan. If a four-year college or university does not foster an institution-wide appreciation of transfer students as full-fledged members of the campus community, their presence serves neither the student nor the institution well.
  • 21. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Outreach to Community College Students The following are some of the challenges, recruiters may face when reaching out to community college transfer students. Finding qualified students ready to transfer. Transfer students as a cohort are hard to capture because unlike high school students, they don’t begin and end at the same time. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Outreach to Community College Students The following are some of the challenges, recruiters may face when reaching out to community college transfer students. Finding qualified students ready to transfer. Transfer students as a cohort are hard to capture because unlike high school students, they don’t begin and end at the same time.
  • 22. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Outreach to Community College Students • Transfer students face many obstacles when preparing to transfer, entrance requirements vary from institution to institution. Outreach messages regarding requirements and expectations must be intentional and focus on academic preparation. • States one educator “If you want transfer students to be successful, academic preparation should not be an afterthought”. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Outreach to Community College Students • Transfer students face many obstacles when preparing to transfer, entrance requirements vary from institution to institution. Outreach messages regarding requirements and expectations must be intentional and focus on academic preparation. • States one educator “If you want transfer students to be successful, academic preparation should not be an afterthought”.
  • 23. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Admitting Community College students Experts agree that the goal of any successful transfer process is to admit academically prepared students who are ready to begin the major at the four-year institution. It makes little sense to enroll students only to have them repeat or complete additional lower division courses. While the goal is clear, the road getting there may be rocky.( College Board, 2011) Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Admitting Community College students Experts agree that the goal of any successful transfer process is to admit academically prepared students who are ready to begin the major at the four-year institution. It makes little sense to enroll students only to have them repeat or complete additional lower division courses. While the goal is clear, the road getting there may be rocky.( College Board, 2011)
  • 24. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students Four-year colleges and universities interested in recruiting significant numbers of community college students have to prepare for three challenges: evaluating the transfer students’ application files, which are more difficult to review than freshman files; assessing the students’ preparation for their intended major; and determining the students’ educational fit. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students Four-year colleges and universities interested in recruiting significant numbers of community college students have to prepare for three challenges: evaluating the transfer students’ application files, which are more difficult to review than freshman files; assessing the students’ preparation for their intended major; and determining the students’ educational fit.
  • 25. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students • Standardized articulation agreements • Evaluating transcripts • Reviewing the students coursework carefully to make certain that he or she is ready to handle upper division courses. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students • Standardized articulation agreements • Evaluating transcripts • Reviewing the students coursework carefully to make certain that he or she is ready to handle upper division courses.
  • 26. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students-Partnerships and Alliances help to create transfer pathways Using a JK Cooke Foundation grant,UNC Chapel Hill partners with Raleigh Durham schools to prepare potential community college students. Other institutions participating in a similar initiative are: Georgetown University, University of Central Florida, Iowa State and Texas A& M. Likewise, Wichita State and Butler CC have a strong alliance/partnership. Providing Pathways for Community College Students Admitting Community College students-Partnerships and Alliances help to create transfer pathways Using a JK Cooke Foundation grant,UNC Chapel Hill partners with Raleigh Durham schools to prepare potential community college students. Other institutions participating in a similar initiative are: Georgetown University, University of Central Florida, Iowa State and Texas A& M. Likewise, Wichita State and Butler CC have a strong alliance/partnership.
  • 27. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • Colleges should Honor the presence and contributions of Community College Students • After the community College students are admitted, institutions face the challenge of “establishing a comprehensive and strategic transfer initiative: serving them as full- fledged members of the campus”. (College Board, 2011) Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • Colleges should Honor the presence and contributions of Community College Students • After the community College students are admitted, institutions face the challenge of “establishing a comprehensive and strategic transfer initiative: serving them as full- fledged members of the campus”. (College Board, 2011)
  • 28. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • The culture of your institution is critical • Remember we spoke earlier about authenticity of commitment to transfers students • If the institution is authentic, there will be an establishment of a transfer culture that assists the student in negotiating the gap between the community college and the new institution. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • The culture of your institution is critical • Remember we spoke earlier about authenticity of commitment to transfers students • If the institution is authentic, there will be an establishment of a transfer culture that assists the student in negotiating the gap between the community college and the new institution.
  • 29. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • Orientation-Four year institutions need to think carefully about what they need to address. • Transfer centers-Models vary, but this center can be a place where they can forge connections with other transfer students. • Reserve special housing for Transfer students Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Creating a Transfer Receptive Culture- • Orientation-Four year institutions need to think carefully about what they need to address. • Transfer centers-Models vary, but this center can be a place where they can forge connections with other transfer students. • Reserve special housing for Transfer students
  • 30. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Summary • Make a commitment to Community College students • Intentional and purposeful outreach to community college students • Admit and provide financial aid for community college students • Create a receptive transfer culture Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Summary • Make a commitment to Community College students • Intentional and purposeful outreach to community college students • Admit and provide financial aid for community college students • Create a receptive transfer culture
  • 31. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps • Community Colleges enroll more students than any other postsecondary segment in the Unites States (College Board, 2011) “Students from underserved groups attend community colleges in greater numbers than four-year institutions and, according to virtually every demographer alive, these student groups, especially Hispanic students, are predicted to post the greatest gains in population for the foreseeable future.” Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps • Community Colleges enroll more students than any other postsecondary segment in the Unites States (College Board, 2011) “Students from underserved groups attend community colleges in greater numbers than four-year institutions and, according to virtually every demographer alive, these student groups, especially Hispanic students, are predicted to post the greatest gains in population for the foreseeable future.”
  • 32. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps The growing popularity of community colleges mean that the transfer process will become increasingly important as a pathway for students who wish to earn a bachelor’s degree. Community College leaders offer this advice: Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps The growing popularity of community colleges mean that the transfer process will become increasingly important as a pathway for students who wish to earn a bachelor’s degree. Community College leaders offer this advice:
  • 33. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps Community College leaders offer this advice: • Create an institution-wide vision that includes transfer students. • Treat transfers in outreach, admission, and academic and student affairs with a devotion similar to that of first-year students; and understand that the needs of transfer students may be different than those of first- year students. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps Community College leaders offer this advice: • Create an institution-wide vision that includes transfer students. • Treat transfers in outreach, admission, and academic and student affairs with a devotion similar to that of first-year students; and understand that the needs of transfer students may be different than those of first- year students.
  • 34. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps If it is true that access and equity is a goal embraced by most colleges and universities in the country, then a partnership with — perhaps even a reliance on —community colleges and the transfer pathway will be essential.(College Board, 2011) Exercise Providing Pathways for Community College Students: Recommendations and Next Steps If it is true that access and equity is a goal embraced by most colleges and universities in the country, then a partnership with — perhaps even a reliance on —community colleges and the transfer pathway will be essential.(College Board, 2011) Exercise
  • 35. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: References • College Board Report: Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four Year Institutions- Perspectives of Leaders from Baccalaureate- Granting Institutions (2011) • Facilitating Seamless Transition for Transfer Students: University- Community College Relationships. Session W1.126 AACRAO 2006, San Diego, Ca • Geleskie. E. (2008). Advisors Perceptions of Barriers to a Smooth Transition from a Community College to a Four-Year University. Dissertation. University of Pennsylvania Providing Pathways for Community College Students: References • College Board Report: Improving Student Transfer from Community Colleges to Four Year Institutions- Perspectives of Leaders from Baccalaureate- Granting Institutions (2011) • Facilitating Seamless Transition for Transfer Students: University- Community College Relationships. Session W1.126 AACRAO 2006, San Diego, Ca • Geleskie. E. (2008). Advisors Perceptions of Barriers to a Smooth Transition from a Community College to a Four-Year University. Dissertation. University of Pennsylvania
  • 36. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: References • Haurwitz, R. (2010). Community colleges face funding, classroom challenges amid rising enrollment. Statesman.com (December 29, 2010) • Johnson, G. (2007). Seamless Transition in the Twenty- First Century: Partnering to Survive and Thrive. New Directions for Community Colleges, no 139.Fall 2007 • Mellow, G &Heelan, C. (2008). Minding The Dream . Rowman and Littlefield, New York, NY • Rhoades, G. (2012) Closing the Door, Increasing the Gap: Who’s not going to (community) college?. Center for the Future of Higher Education. Providing Pathways for Community College Students: References • Haurwitz, R. (2010). Community colleges face funding, classroom challenges amid rising enrollment. Statesman.com (December 29, 2010) • Johnson, G. (2007). Seamless Transition in the Twenty- First Century: Partnering to Survive and Thrive. New Directions for Community Colleges, no 139.Fall 2007 • Mellow, G &Heelan, C. (2008). Minding The Dream . Rowman and Littlefield, New York, NY • Rhoades, G. (2012) Closing the Door, Increasing the Gap: Who’s not going to (community) college?. Center for the Future of Higher Education.

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