12 Reasons to Start Potty Training Right

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Potty training is a big step for kids and parents alike.

Potty training was thought of differently, years back, compared to how we view it now. One-year-old children were routinely placed on the potty after all meals, for instance, and kept there until they eliminated.

You are considering to read this presentation because you have a child who needs potty training or you know someone who does. Good for you!

Reading and learning is the first step to successful potty training.


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12 Reasons to Start Potty Training Right

  1. 1. 12 Reasons to Start Potty Training Right Presentation: Ray Caran
  2. 2. 12 Reasons to Start Potty Training Right Common Potty-Training Problems and a Solution Moving from diapers to potty is often not a smooth process. Listed below are some of the common problems that may come with toilet training and ways to cope with the situation. 1. Your child doesn't recognize the need to urinate, even though he recognizes the need to move his bowels. This is not unusual. Some children don't gain complete bladder control for a number of months after they have learned to control bowel movements. Keep this in mind as their potty training goes forward. 2. Your child attempts to play with the feces. This just stems from natural curiosity. The key is to prevent this without making him or her feel overly upset by saying, "This is not something you should play with." 3. Your son wants to sit down to urinate. Most boys will want to sit while learning to go in the potty. Allow him to urinate sitting down and, after he has command of his bladder, simply explain to him that boys go to the potty standing up. He very well may pick this up on his own if he wants to imitate his dad or other friends going to the bathroom. 4. Your child resists going to the potty. This may mean that it's not the right time to start training. Be observant. When your child seems to need to urinate or have a bowel movement, firmly take him to the potty. Don’t keep your child seated on the potty for more than a few minutes
  3. 3. 5. Your child will have an accident. Accidents happen, that is part of the process. When they do, treat them lightly and try not to get overly upset. Being harsh will often make children feel bad and may make toilet training take longer. 6. Your child gets concerned when she sees her stools flushed away. Some children seem to believe that their wastes are a permanent part part of their bodies, so this may be scary and difficult for them to understand. Simply explain what wastes are and how the body's needs to remove them from the child’s system. 7. Your child is honestly afraid of being sucked into the toilet. The majority of children fear being sucked into the toilet especially if it is flushed while they're still sitting on it. To calm the child and give them a feeling of control, let him or her flush small pieces of toilet paper. This will go a long way towards lessening the fear of the sound of rushing water and the sight of slowly disappearing. 8. Your child has a bowel movement or urinates right after being taken off the toilet. This will probably happen frequently in the early potty training process. It most likely will take time for your child to learn that they have the power to relax the muscles that control the bowel and bladder. If this happens frequently, it just mean your child is not really ready for training. Wait awhile and try again.
  4. 4. 9. Your child asks for a familiar diaper when a bowel movement is expected and stands in their special place to defecate. This means that she is physically but not emotionally -- ready to be potty trained. Don’t consider this a failure, heap praises on your child for knowing and feeling the bowel signals. You might suggest that he or she have the bowel movement in the bathroom while wearing a diaper. This will help the child to realize that a bowel movement and the bathroom go together. 10. Your child urinates while in bed. Just like most kids, your own toddler probably will take a little longer to complete nap-time and nighttime toilet training. Gently encourage your toddler to use the potty just before going to bed and as soon as he is awake. Remind him that if he wakes up in the middle of the night and needs to use the toilet, he can either go by himself or call on you to help. 11. Your child is really only comfortable going to the potty with one individual. This is very normal. If your child will only go potty with you, slowly remove yourself from the process. For example, offer to help your child get undressed or walk your child to the bathroom. But wait outside the door. 12. Your child is regressing backward to her diaper days. Stress frequently encourages her to return to a previous level of development, particularly if the change is new. Examples would be, illness in the child or a relative, a new infant in the house, changing from crib to bed, or a moving to a new house. Wait a little while and it will pass. Please remember that toilet training, done badly, can lead to medical complications, including dysfunctional voiding, constipation and impaction-and even child abuse.
  5. 5. Potty training is a big step for kids and parents alike. Potty training was thought of differently, years back, compared to how we view it now. One-year-old were routinely placed on the potty after all meals, for instance, and kept there until they eliminated. Belief it or not methods such as enemas, physical punishment, shaming, and even strapping the child to the potty were used to make sure she eliminated before leaving the bathroom. These questionable procedures are based on conditioning rather than real learning. It really as if you were trying to housebreak a family pet. A potty-training success depends on the physical and emotional readiness of your child, not a specific age. The majority of children show an interest in potty training by age 2, but still others might not be ready until age 2 1/2 or even older — take your time. If you start potty training too early, it could easily take longer to train your child. You are reading this presentation because you have a child who needs potty training or you know someone who does. There are many different ways of potty training. If you would like to read about one that has had resounding success CLICK HERE.

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