(PROJEKTURA) open data big data @tgg osijek

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Presentation from The Geek Gathering 2013 event, Osijek, October 2013. Great event, great people, looking forward to the next year.

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  • Timing:Objective: Talk aboutoriginsof Open Governmentin Europe.Talking Points:Many licenses proposed:OpenData Commons proposes three licenses:Public Domain Dedication and License (PDDL)Attribution License (ODC-By)Open Database License (ODC-ODbL) - Like the GPL (or CC Attribution Share-Alike) requires public reusers of your data to share back changes (and attribute)Opendefinition gives a list of licences conformant or not to “open” definitionMany national licenses:CanadaUKNorwayItaly
  • Timing:Objective: Talk aboutoriginsof Open Governmentin Europe.Talking Points:Many licenses proposed:OpenData Commons proposes three licenses:Public Domain Dedication and License (PDDL)Attribution License (ODC-By)Open Database License (ODC-ODbL) - Like the GPL (or CC Attribution Share-Alike) requires public reusers of your data to share back changes (and attribute)Opendefinition gives a list of licences conformant or not to “open” definitionMany national licenses:CanadaUKNorwayItaly
  • Timing:Objective: Establish uderstandingwhyopen data isimportant.Talking Points:„higherdegreeofeffectivenessandefficiency”: P.Weiss „BordersinCyberspace:ConflictingPublicSectorInformationPoliciesandtheirEconomicImpacts” ed: US. Department ofCommerce, 2004„strenghten trust inestablishment”: R.Marcella nad G. Baxter: „Informationneed, informationseekingbehaviourandparticipation, witspecial reference to needsrelated to citizenship: resultsofnationalsurvey”, Journal ofDocumentation, vol 56, pp.- 136 – 160, 2002
  • Timing:Objective: Establish changing expectations of information access and management.Talking Points:Open FormatThe US Government through the Open Government Directive (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/assets/memoranda_2010/m10-06.pdf ) defines an open format as “one that is platform independent, machine readable, and made available to the public without restrictions that would impede the re-use of that information.”MetadataThe information about the data being sharedWho produced itWhereWhenUse restrictionsEtc.Use standards such as ADMS or Dublin CoreNew (Search-oriented) Embedded dataset metadata coming
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofexpertsworkingtogether on publishedGovernmentstructured dataTalking Points:from „Government Dana andtheInvisibleHand”, David Robinson, PrincetonCenter for Information Technology Polidy
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Demo CaseTalking Points:
  • Timing:30 secObjective: To introduce Open Linked Data concepts.Talking Points:n/a
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Demo CaseTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the ratingsthat are usuallyassociatedwith Open Data, viathe model thatwasraisedby TBLTalking Points:What are the costs & benefits of ★ Web data?As a consumer ...You can look at it.You can print it.You can store it locally (on your hard drive or on an USB stick).You can enter the data into any other system.You can change the data as you wish.You can share the data with anyone you like.As a publisher ...It's simple to publish.You do not have explain repeatedly to others that they can use your data.“It's great to have the data accessible on the Web under an open license (such as PDDL, ODC-by or CC0), however, the data is locked-up in a document. Other than writing a custom scraper, it's hard to get the data out of the document. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★ Web data and additionally:You can directly process it with proprietary software to aggregate it, perform calculations, visualise it, etc.You can export it into another (structured) format.As a publisher ...It's still simple to publish.“Splendid! The data is accessible on the Web in a structured way (that is, machine-readable), however, the data is still locked-up in a document. To get the data out of the document you depend on proprietary software. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★ Web data and additionally:You can manipulate the data in any way you like, without being confined by the capabilities of any particular software.As a publisher ...⚠ You might need converters or plug-ins to export the data from the proprietary format.It's still rather simple to publish.“Excellent! The data is not only available via the Web but now everyone can use the data easily. On the other hand, it's still data on the Web and not data in the Web.”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★ Web data and additionally:You can link to it from any other place (on the Web or locally).You can bookmark it.You can reuse parts of the data.You may be able to reuse existing tools and libraries, even if they only understand parts of the pattern the publisher used.⚠ Understanding the structure of an RDF "Graph" of data can be more effort than tabular (Excel/CSV) or tree (XML/JSON) data.You can combine the data safely with other data. URIs are a global scheme so if two things have the same URI then it's intentional, and if so that's well on it's way to being 5 star data!As a publisher ...You have fine-granular control over the data items and can optimize their access (load balancing, caching, etc.)Other data publishers can now link into your data, promoting it to 5 star!⚠ You typically invest some time slicing and dicing your data.⚠ You'll need to assign URIs to data items and think about how to represent the data.⚠ You need to either find existing patterns to reuse or create your own.“Wonderful! Now it's data in the Web. The (most important) data items have a URI and can be shared on the Web. A native way to represent the data is using RDF, however other formats such as Atom can be converted/mapped, if required. ”What are the costs & benefits of ★★★★★ Web data?As a consumer, you can do all what you can do with ★★★★ Web data and additionally:You can discover more (related) data while consuming the data.You can directly learn about the data schema.⚠ You now have to deal with broken data links, just like 404 errors in web pages.⚠ Presenting data from an arbitrary link as fact is as risky as letting people include content from any website in your pages. Caution, trust and common sense are all still necessary.As a publisher ...You make your data discoverable.You increase the value of your data.You own organization will gain the same benefits from the links as the consumers.⚠ You'll need to invest resources to link your data to other data on the Web.⚠ You may need to repair broken or incorrect links.more info: http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the Open Data Execution FrameworkTalking Points:
  • Timing:30 secObjective: To introduce Open Linked Data concepts.Talking Points:n/a
  • Timing:Objective: Thetruevalueof data canbeshownonlyviaapplicationsthatshouldbebuilt on top ofthe dataTalking Points:
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofexpertsworkingtogether on publishedGovernmentstructured dataTalking Points:Processis SIMPLE: governmentpublish data streams, 3rd partiescreatetools for analysisandoversight, expertscollaboratively monitor theirgovernment, expertsdetectissues, givefeedbackandissues are resolvedExamples: SPECIALIZED SKILLS: PeerToPatent.com (Peer To Patent is a historic initiative by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) that opens the patent examination process to public participation for the first time. Peer to Patent is an online system that aims to improve the quality of issued patents by enabling the public to supply the USPTO with information relevant to assessing the claims of pending patent applications.)LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: FixMyStreet.COM (FixMyStreet is a site to help people report, view, or discuss local problems they’ve found to their local council by simply locating them on a map. It launched in early February 2007.)PROFESSIONAL AMATEURS: MapLight.COM (MapLight is a nonpartisan research organization that reveals money’s influence on politics in the U.S. Congress and in the California and Wisconsin Legislatures. We provide journalists and citizens with transparency tools that connect data on campaign contributions, politicians, legislative votes, industries, companies, and more to show patterns of influence never before possible to see. These tools allow users to gain unique insights into how campaign contributions affect policy so they can draw their own conclusions about how money influences our political system.)
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofexpertsworkingtogether on publishedGovernmentstructured dataTalking Points:Processis SIMPLE: governmentpublish data streams, 3rd partiescreatetools for analysisandoversight, expertscollaboratively monitor theirgovernment, expertsdetectissues, givefeedbackandissues are resolvedExamples: SPECIALIZED SKILLS: PeerToPatent.com (Peer To Patent is a historic initiative by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) that opens the patent examination process to public participation for the first time. Peer to Patent is an online system that aims to improve the quality of issued patents by enabling the public to supply the USPTO with information relevant to assessing the claims of pending patent applications.)LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: FixMyStreet.COM (FixMyStreet is a site to help people report, view, or discuss local problems they’ve found to their local council by simply locating them on a map. It launched in early February 2007.)PROFESSIONAL AMATEURS: MapLight.COM (MapLight is a nonpartisan research organization that reveals money’s influence on politics in the U.S. Congress and in the California and Wisconsin Legislatures. We provide journalists and citizens with transparency tools that connect data on campaign contributions, politicians, legislative votes, industries, companies, and more to show patterns of influence never before possible to see. These tools allow users to gain unique insights into how campaign contributions affect policy so they can draw their own conclusions about how money influences our political system.)
  • Timing:Objective: Talk aboutoriginsof Open Governmentin Europe.Talking Points:United States – Open GovernmentTransparency, Participation, CollaborationGreat Britain – Smarter Governmentsome keywordsCivic Society, Local Priorities, Managing Assets Australia – Engage Getting on with Gov 2.0Declaration of Open Gov – key phrases include:“using technology to increase citizen engagement and collaboration …”“public sector information is a national resource”“online engagement by public servants …. should be enabled and encouraged”
  • Timing:30 secObjective: To introduce Open Linked Data concepts.Talking Points:n/a
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofexpertsworkingtogether on publishedGovernmentstructured dataTalking Points:from „Government Dana andtheInvisibleHand”, David Robinson, PrincetonCenter for Information Technology Polidy
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofexpertsworkingtogether on publishedGovernmentstructured dataTalking Points:from „Government Dana andtheInvisibleHand”, David Robinson, PrincetonCenter for Information Technology Polidy
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofGovernment LAB, and how to let othersexperimentinsteadofGovernmentTalking Points:CKAN (Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network) is open-source “data hub” software designed to make it easier to find, share, reuse and collaboratively develop data and content, especially open data and contentThe core of CKAN is a powerful registry / catalog system designed for machine interaction so that tasks like registering and acquiring datasets can be automated (though it’s also easy for humans to use too!)Used for http://data.gov.uk and many others:http://wiki.okfn.org/ckan/instancesFree/Open-Source software, written in PythonCore catalog based around Resources (Files and APIs) and groupings of those (Packages)PublishandFindDatasets: Publish datasets via import or through a web interface. Search by keyword or filter by tags. See dataset information at a glance. Full change history lets you easily undo changes or view old versions.Store andmanage Data: Store the raw data and metadata. Visualise structured data with interactive tables, graphs and maps. Get statistics and usage metrics for your datasets. Search geospatial data on a map by areaEngagewithusersandothers: Federate networks with other CKAN nodes. Theme with CSS or integrate with a CMS. Build a community with extensions that allow users to comment on and follow datasetsCustomizeandExtend: Use the API‘s rich programming interface, and benefit from over 60 extensions including link checking, comments, and analytics. CKAN’s Open Sourcelicence allows you to download and run it for free
  • Timing:30 secObjective: To introduce Open Linked Data concepts.Talking Points:n/a
  • STAGE 1: Personification of Dumb ObjectsIdentity is provided to selected objects (QR Codes e.g.)Value in interaction with other intelligent systemsSTAGE 2: Partially Autonomous Sensor Network„Things” develop the ability to sense the environment, location and other devicesValue in those things taking action (controlled thermostat e.g.)STAGE 3: Autonomous Independent Devices„Things” dont require interactionTehy sense context and autonomously interact with other things, sensors and servicesMajority of them will be connected to the things that
  • I’d like to introduce the 3V’s of Big DataIs it big as in Volume? Where your data exceeds limits of physical capabilities of systems today.Is it Velocity? The data is moving at a fast rate and value can decay over time.Is it Variability? of structure from unstructured, semi-structured to highly structured data.Doug Laney http://blogs.gartner.com/doug-laney/files/2012/01/ad949-3D-Data-Management-Controlling-Data-Volume-Velocity-and-Variety.pdfGiven all of this data, and the variety of sources there are new questions that we can answer today that weren’t possible just a few years ago.By asking and answering these questions you canreap the benefits of Big Data.Data is everywhere to be mined, but we have what one can call "the pomegranate problem" Imagine all of your data being inside a pomegranate. When you eat a pomegranate it’s a bit difficult getting into all of the little pieces inside the pomegranate out, it's a bit of work.That’s the process that you need to go through to extract insights out of your data.It’s useful to think of it in this way; where your data is the platform. Not the tooling that surrounds it. It’s all about the data. It’s all about the questions that you ask.The answer is it’s all of the above.Finally some refer to the fourth V of Big data as Value; the value of the insight that can be gained from extracting insight form your Big Data sources.
  • LENDDO Some—like the Hong Kong-based Lenddo, which currently operates in the Philippines and Colombia—do so by scrutinizing the applicants' connections on Facebook and Twitter. The key to getting a successful loan from Lenddo is having a handful of highly trusted individuals in your social networks. If they vouch for you and you get the loan, your select friends will also be notified of your successes in repaying the loan. (In the past, Lenddo even threatened to notify them—exerting maximum peer pressure—if you had problems repaying the loan.)Similarly, the U.S.-based LendUp, which hands out short-term loans with high interest rates while allowing its most trusted established clients to move to more attractive longer-term packages, looks at social media activity to ensure that factual data provided on the online application matches what can be inferred from Facebook and TwitterSimilarly, the U.S.-based LendUp, which hands out short-term loans with high interest rates while allowing its most trusted established clients to move to more attractive longer-term packages, looks at social media activity to ensure that factual data provided on the online application matches what can be inferred from Facebook and Twitter
  • The presentations reviewed include:•Clearing the human road block: overcoming departmental silo mentalities, given by WimCasteur, Business Intelligence Manager, Belgacom Group Strategy Customer & Market Intelligence. A great case study on what it takes to consolidate the customer data silos in a telco to start to use big data effectively.•Big Data - Big opportunities - Big risks? Given by Dr. Richard Benjamins, Director Business Intelligence, Telefonica Digital. Good introduction to Big Data and the issues facing Telcos on Big Data; this presentation was quoted throughout the rest of the conference.•Big Data: The Next New Big Revenue Opportunity for Carriers? Given by Kevin SooHoo, Sprint. Excellent and quite frank review of the opportunities and challenges in selling customer insight.•Delta Engagement management, big data for big change, given by Peter Crayfourd, Qifa Solutions. Example of the use of Big Data to review the customers complete experience to make better decisions, and importantly treat people as individuals not segments.•Big Data and Predictive Analytics what we can and cannot achieve with analytical BI tools, given by RokasSalasevicius, Civitta. Refreshingly frank review of the many failures of BI in delivering business results, and links nicely to the points raised by the previous speakers on customer all the data to build a better model enabling treatments to be experimented with and tracked•Moving from traditional to predictive business intelligence: Creating a consistent consumer experience , given by Dejan Radosavljevik Service Intelligence, T-Mobile Netherlands. Excellent case study in using customer insight to better manage the network, spending the network investment where it impacts customer satisfaction.Some of the themes that recurred throughout the event were:•It's about people and process NOT technology.•Most telcos have problems in simply accessing their data with a single view because of organizational silos. This is a major barrier to exist BI, never mind big data.•Privacy is being managed, but operators need to get ahead of the discussion rather that reacting to it. For example in the US we're likely to see much discussion in 2013 given some of the public communications mistakes.•Creating a data business is questionable, the consensus view is the risks outweigh the benefits. We should focus on eating our own dog-food before trying to sell it through a 3rd party that takes most of the value.•We have only begun to scratch the surface on building better customer relationships, offering treatments that work, and better running our network. Big data is essential, taking averages is not longer adequate, rather examining the customer's complete experience with an operator.•The web service providers are encouraging telcos to step-up their game, and though big data is being used as an adjunct to the existing BI and DWH (Data Warehouse) systems we will start to see over the coming year greater experimentation with real-time analytics running on top of the Hadoop cluster.•Its great to see such an IT focused discussion happening within Telco as I've discussed many times our industry is going through an ITization. Though young, this conference provides an important nexus across IT innovations, customer experience management and network operations
  • Timing:Objective: Introduce the conecptofGovernment LAB, and how to let othersexperimentinsteadofGovernmentTalking Points:CKAN (Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network) is open-source “data hub” software designed to make it easier to find, share, reuse and collaboratively develop data and content, especially open data and contentThe core of CKAN is a powerful registry / catalog system designed for machine interaction so that tasks like registering and acquiring datasets can be automated (though it’s also easy for humans to use too!)Used for http://data.gov.uk and many others:http://wiki.okfn.org/ckan/instancesFree/Open-Source software, written in PythonCore catalog based around Resources (Files and APIs) and groupings of those (Packages)PublishandFindDatasets: Publish datasets via import or through a web interface. Search by keyword or filter by tags. See dataset information at a glance. Full change history lets you easily undo changes or view old versions.Store andmanage Data: Store the raw data and metadata. Visualise structured data with interactive tables, graphs and maps. Get statistics and usage metrics for your datasets. Search geospatial data on a map by areaEngagewithusersandothers: Federate networks with other CKAN nodes. Theme with CSS or integrate with a CMS. Build a community with extensions that allow users to comment on and follow datasetsCustomizeandExtend: Use the API‘s rich programming interface, and benefit from over 60 extensions including link checking, comments, and analytics. CKAN’s Open Sourcelicence allows you to download and run it for free
  • (PROJEKTURA) open data big data @tgg osijek

    1. 1. OPEN DATA, BIG DATA STORY Ratko Mutavdzic, PROJEKTURA, Experience Architect
    2. 2. OPEN DATA VS. BIG DATA • • • • • Open Data =/= Big Data (usually) Big Data = Open Data (usually) Open Data could grow to Big Data Big Data = BUSINESS THEN TRANSPARENCY (Business Conversation) Open Data = TRANSPARENCY THEN BUSINESS (Government Conversation) THE NEW REALITY BUT TWO DIFFERENT THINGS
    3. 3. OPEN DATA International Right-To-Know Goal “to raise global awareness of individuals’ right to access government information”, and „to promote access to information as a fundamental human right” THE NEW REALITY 2006 EC MEPSIR Study
    4. 4. WHY OPEN DATA TRANSPARENCY PARTICIPATION COLLABORATION
    5. 5. PUBLIC DATA OPEN FORMATS MACHINE READABLE ACCESSIBLE WHAT MAKES DATA OPEN • open format • publised via industry standards like XML, RDF, HTML, CSV for data, PDF for documents • metadata • published via standards like Dublin Core • catalouge of open data sources • http://logd.tw.rpi.edu/ right information is available for people to make a right decisions ... at all levels of the organization
    6. 6. PUBLIC INFORMATION POOL Public Information / Content Pool CATEGORY Public Sector Information Public Sector Content EXAMPLE geo data, statistical data, other numbers geo data, statistical data, other numbers OBJECTIVE INFORMATION RE-USE CONTENT AVAILABILITY CHARACTERISTICS source: adapted from OECD, 2006 • transformation of raw data by value addition • frequent combination of information types • education and cultural value • limited commercial exploatation • content not transformed
    7. 7. KEY COMPONENTS • • Open Data Portal Open Data API WHAT IS OPEN DATA SOLUTION few words of wisdom
    8. 8. OPEN DATA IN U.K. open.data.gov.uk CKAN, Cloud Most respected Open Data implementation
    9. 9. OPEN LINKED DATA
    10. 10. AGENDA • • • What is Open (Linked) Data? Linked Data Standards and Tools Linked Open Data in Practice (LINKED) (OPEN) DATA few words of wisdom
    11. 11. PUBLIC DATA vs. OPEN DATA • • • difficult to find difficult to reuse difficult to integrate (LINKED) (OPEN) DATA few words of wisdom
    12. 12. WHAT IS OPEN DATA?
    13. 13. WHAT IS LINKED OPEN DATA?
    14. 14. WHAT IS LINKED OPEN DATA? ima zabavni život ima sportska događanja ima financije ima sveučilište OSIJEK ima državnu upravu ima zapošljavanje
    15. 15. LINKED OPEN DATA Facilitating data integration through: • Common data model • Building relations 2 KEY INGREDIENTS tbd
    16. 16. KEY INGREDIENTS 1. 2. RDF RESOURCE DESCRIPTION FRAMEWORK (GRAPH BASED DATA) • identifies objects (URIs) • interlink information (Relationships) VOCABULARIES (ONTOLOGIES) • provide shared understanding of data • organize knowledge in a machine comprehensible way • give an exploitable meaning to the data 2 KEY INGRIDIENTS tbd
    17. 17. LINKED OPEN DATA make your stuff available on the Web (whatever format) under an open licence make it available as structured data (e.g. Excel instead of image scan of a table) use non-proprierary format (e.g. CSV instead of Excel) user URI to denote things, so that people can point at your stuff link your data to other data to provide context 5 STARS OPEN DATA MODEL Tim Berners-Lee, Linked Data initiative http://lab.linkeddata.deri.ie/2010/star-scheme-by-example
    18. 18. ON WEB, OPEN LICENSE • • ON THE WEB • wide access • google can index it • people can find it themselves OPEN LINCENCE • regulate reuse of data • helps maintain provenance • strengthens business reuse 1 STAR http://opendefinition.org/licenses/
    19. 19. STRUCTURED DATA • 2 STAR MACHINE READABLE
    20. 20. FORMATS • • • • GOOD „GOOD” BAD BAD, BAD XLSX, CSV, JSON, MICRODATA WEB, DOCX PDF charts, maps, images • SCREENSCRAPING? http://scraperwiki.com 2 STAR http://opendefinition.org/licenses/
    21. 21. NON PROPRIETARY FORMATS • • • Freedom of how to process, analyse and visualise data PROPRIETARY • DOCX, XLSX, PDF NON PROPRIETARY • CSV, XML, JSON, MICRODATA, RDF 3 STAR http://opendefinition.org/licenses/
    22. 22. USE OF URI • Unique identifiers enable others to point to the data 4 STAR http://opendefinition.org/licenses/
    23. 23. LINKING DATA (AND RDF) • • „Linked Data” approach have its use cases in Web Applications with LOT of Data and little Semantics Example: definme simple relationship and apply to large, heterogenous data collections 5 STAR: Link your data to other data to provide context http://lod-cloud.net
    24. 24. RESOURCE DESCRIPTION FRAMEWORK • • • Web is a global, universal information space for documents Can we do the same for DATA and make the web into a database? RDF is the DATA FORMAT for that database Part fo the 5 STAR story http://lod-cloud.net
    25. 25. RDF 101 small pieces, loosely joined, easy to reuse, easy to recombine, unexpected reuse, iterative
    26. 26. TYPICAL DATABASE TABLE ISBN TITLE AUTHOR PUBLISHERID PAGES 112349987 Practical RDF David Nelson Jr. 11692 443 234998021 C# for Dummies Rick Torrensen 11692 1120 501334301 Calling the Stack Shelly Monroe 45009 128 ... ... Part of the 5 STAR story http://lod-cloud.net
    27. 27. TYPICAL DATABASE TABLE ISBN AUTHOR PUBLISHERID PAGES 112349987 Practical RDF David Nelson Jr. 11692 443 234998021 C# for Dummies Rick Torrensen 11692 1120 501334301 Calling the Stack Shelly Monroe 45009 128 ... ... properties subjects TITLE Part of the 5 STAR story http://lod-cloud.net Intersection is a property of the subject
    28. 28. LINKING DATA title book C# for Dummies property subject The essence of RDF: the „TRIPLE” value
    29. 29. TYPICAL DATABASE TABLE ISBN TITLE AUTHOR PUBLISHERID PAGES 112349987 Practical RDF David Nelson Jr. 11692 443 234998021 C# for Dummies Rick Torrensen 11692 1120 501334301 Calling the Stack Shelly Monroe 45009 128 ... ... SELECTING MULTIPLE PROPERTIES
    30. 30. LINKING DATA title book C# for Dummies isbn 2349908 author Rick Torrensen publisher publisher name Relationship between „things” Amazon multiple properties graphically: think in the terms of graphs, not XML or documents
    31. 31. USING THE WEB INFRASTRUCTURE • • • • For Web scale database we need to be able to identify things globally and uniquely URI (URLs) already provide those capabilities Name things with URIs, specifically http:// This is THE KEY to linked data Part of the 5 STAR story http://lod-cloud.net
    32. 32. RDF IN PRACTICE named resources http://example. com/thing named relations numeric values and literals http://example.com/rel „text” http://example.com/other 3.141592 • • • • The URI identifies the thing you are describing If two people create data using the same URI then they are describing the same thing That makes it easy to merge data from different sources together RDF data can use URIs from many different websites
    33. 33. OPEN LINKED DATA IN U.K. open.data.gov.uk Cloud Monitors air and water quality Citizens rate quality via SMS
    34. 34. LINKED DATA STANDARDS Government Linked Data (GLD) WG http://www.w3.org/2011/gld/
    35. 35. SPARQL • Query language of the semantic web. It lets us: • Pull values from STRUCTURED and SEMI STRUCTURED data • Explore data by querying UNKNOWN RELATIONSHIPS • Perform, COMPLEX JOINS OF DISPARATE DATABASES • Transforms RDF from one vocabulary to another Common understaning about „things” supports the automatic generation of new information
    36. 36. SPARQL # prefix declarations PREFIX foo: <http://example.com/resources/> ... # dataset definition FROM ... # result clause SELECT ... # query pattern WHERE { ... } # query modifiers ORDER BY ... Common understaning about „things” supports the automatic generation of new information
    37. 37. SO, WHAT DO WE DO WITH THE DATA?
    38. 38. HACKATONS: DATA + APPLICATIONS! • • • • value is not in the raw data alone (but the data needs to be published first!) applications for use of the data is key to open data success size of the application does not guarantee its value and success value to the Citizen is the bottom line BE SURE THAT YOU HAVE APP BUILDING PROCESS … or paid teams, unpaid volunteers, hackatons, open data camps, student competitions
    39. 39. MANY FORMS, SAME PURPOSE FOR EXAMPLE, INVOLVE… HACKATONS strange word for a noble cause. building together the future in… 48 hours.
    40. 40. PROTOTYPES OR RESULTS COMING FROM HACKATONS but also many different scenarios of organization and citizen engagement resulting in apps
    41. 41. OPEN GOVERNMENT: PARTICIPATION
    42. 42. OPEN DATA ARCHITECTURE
    43. 43. ARCHITECTURE FOR OPEN: HYBRID? Department A Internal Private PORTAL Everybody is using External Public PORTAL is publishing Department B Published Data Agency Internal Network Model that controls sensitive data and supports external scalability and availability. Brigde to PUBLIC. Keywords: Public and Private Cloud. Provider Datacenter. SLA. Published Data External Network
    44. 44. CURRENT VIEW ON OPTIONS solutions on MS solutions on Linux ? CKAN ODGI MS VM LINUX VM PaaS private infrastructure Private Cloud private infrastructure that can be built on Microsoft or Linux based stack SOCRATA CKAN IaaS (LINUX VM) public azure infrastructure Public Cloud (MS AZURE) public Microsoft Azure cinfrastructure supporting „pure play” PaaS solutions and VM based solutions (MS and nonMS) SOCRATA CKAN IaaS (LINUX VM) public cloud infrastructure Public Cloud (nonMS) public cloud infrastrucutre non Microsoft (usually AWS or OpenStack or …)
    45. 45. CKAN • fully featured, mature, open source data management solution: • publish and find datasets • store and manage data • engage with users and others • customize and extend • rich user base: data.gov.uk, publicdata.eu,… OPEN SOURCE DATA PORTAL SOFTWARE CKAN is open source and can be downloaded and used for free
    46. 46. BIG DATA
    47. 47. CIO „Big Data is the frontier of a firm’s ability to store, process, and access (SPA) all of the data it needs to operate, make decisions, reduce risks, and serve customers.” “Predictive analytics solutions allow firms to discover, evaluate, optimize, and deploy predictive models by analyzing data sources to improve business outcomes.” Source: Forrester, „Evaluating Big Data Predictive Analytics Solutions”, 2012
    48. 48. Internet of Things Internet of Everything source: „US Unprepared for Internet Device Flood”, Kurt Stammbergerm MOCANA
    49. 49. Examples of New MultiStructured Data Data types collected as big data and/or with advanced analytics Structured (tables, records) Complex (hierarchical or legacy) Unstructured (text, audio, video) Web logs and clickstreams Machine-generated (sensors, RFID, devices) Other 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% source: „Big Data Analytics”, survey of 325 companies, TDWI 2011
    50. 50. Key Elements of Big Data Analytics and Use BIG ANALYTICS DATA USE Applications Development DATA Analytics BI and Visualization BIG DATA Structured Unstructured Hadoop Data Management and Storage source: „Understanding te elements of Big Data”, Karmasphere, 2011
    51. 51. New Questions Where is BigData coming from... today New era of computing VOLUME: SIZE SOCIAL ANALYTICS: What’s the social sentiment of my product? VELOCITY: SPEED LIVE DATA FEED: How do I optimize my services based on patterns of weather, traffic, etc.? VARIETY: STRUCTURE ADVANCED ANALYTICS: How do I better predict future outcomes? • • • • twitter facebook google people 12+ TB of tweet data every day 25+ TB of logs data every day XX+ TB of search logs every day 2+ bilion people on the web today • • • • RFID smart meters GPS devices trade 30 billion RFID tags today 76 million smart meters today 100+ millions GPS devices per year 5 mililon trade events per second • • phone cams cameras 4,6 billion cams today 100+ thousands video feeds from surveillance Two types of Big Data • Data in Movements (Streams) • Data at Rest (Oceans) ... so that is not our ordinary enterprise environment? Well...
    52. 52. They are all using BigData approach and combine that with „socring as a services mechanisms” like... So What? Well... Big Data For Finance KREDITECH • Looks at 8.000 indicators like location data, social graph, behaviooral analytics, ecommerce shopping behavior and device data... • So, GPS, likes, friends, locations, posts, movement, duration on page, shopping, apps installed, operating system...  ZESTFINANCE Credit socring information via big data, looks at 70.000 signals and feeds them into 10 spearate underwriting models KLOUT Social Media: Trustworthy Borrowers vs. Defaulters LENDDO https://www.lenddo.com/    LENDUP https://www.lendup.com/   Looking at applicant’s connection on Facebook and Twitter Key to get the loan: highly trusted individuals in your social network looks at social media activity to ensure that factual data provided on the online application matches what can be inferred from Facebook and Twitter. WONGA https://www.wonga.com/  considers the time of the day and the way a candidate clicks around the site in determining whether to grant a loan
    53. 53. Early operator initiatives will still involve a strong element of traditional business intelligence and analytics: structure records: Call and Billing Records, Electronic Data Records, Location Records... So What? Well... Big Data for Telcos Unstructured: Phone Calls, Text Messages, Social Media posts... • Telco: competition in a mature market • Two different strategies for growth and mature markets: • • Classical BigData problems: Churn Management (on prepaids) • • • Growth: aquisition strategy, simple BI needs (reporting) Mature: differentiation strategy, complex BI needs (data mining) When to engage (mid of billing cycle) www.globys.com When not to engage (leave good customers alone) www.venda.com How telcos can invent business models? • • • • IMPROVE SERVICES: Data = Improved Business (Amazon) MOBILE ADVERTISING: Data = Better Advertising (Google) SELL ACCESS TO INSIGHTS: Data = Business (comScore) BECOME GATEKEEPER: Data = Personal Risk (www.reputation.com )
    54. 54. OPEN DATA + BIG DATA? • OPEN DATA • You can fetch and use any data that exist around. You can connect that data to any other source and personalize the use. • BIG DATA • You can fetch and use any volume of data that is flowing from devices around you and from your own usage. • OPEN BIG DATA • WE CAN PREDICT AND REACT TO ANY ACTION IMMIDIATELLY IMAGINE THE WORLD... Where you dont have control over the things that happen around you.
    55. 55. INTRO just a few words about me so, if • Ratko Mutavdzic is founder of PROJEKTURA, consulting company that work with new and emerging technologies and introduce them to the corporate and enterprise environments. Prior to this one, he spent 15 years Microsoft, starting in a consulting practice and then leading several different sales and technology teams. • He is the author of number of published papers on different aspects of the technology, successful blogs on new technologies and project management, and active contributor in a number of social networks exploring the use and advance of new ways to connect and share innovation and invention. • He frequently speaks on conferences, meetings, workshops, coffee shops and generally our heads... people like to we all nodat every place wherewe can continue... explore, challenge, investigate, think and innovate. • Keywords: change, project, program, portfolio, innovation, startup note: more contact info on a last slide

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