Technical Report: Mount Bisson Property (Rare Earth Industries)

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Technical Report: Mount Bisson Property (Rare Earth Industries)

  1. 1. Geological Report on the Mount Bisson Rare-Earth Element Claim- Group Omineca Mining Division North-central British Columbia 55°32’25”N 123°58’23”W NTS Reference 93N/9, 93O/5, 93O/12 NI 43-101 Technical Report For Seymour Ventures Corporation 1620-609 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C. V7Y 1C3 Prepared By Frederick W. Breaks, Ph.D., P.Geo. Consulting Geologist Sudbury, Ontario November 28, 2010
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS_______________________________________________________________1. Title Page…………………………………………………………………………………................i2. Table of Contents…………………………………………………………………………………...ii Figures……………………………………………………………………………………………....iv Photos…………………………………………………………………………………………….....v Tables……………………………………………………………………………………………….vii Appendices…………………………………………………………………………………………viii3. Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 9 4. Introduction And Terms Of Reference ......................................................................................... 11 4.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 11 4.2 Terms Of Reference .................................................................................................................... 12 4.3 Sources Of Information............................................................................................................... 13 5. Reliance On Other Experts ........................................................................................................... 13 6. Property Description And Location .............................................................................................. 14 7. Accessibility, Climate, Local Resources, Infrastructure And Physiography ................................ 16 8. History .......................................................................................................................................... 17 9. Geological Setting ......................................................................................................................... 18 9.2 Property Geology ........................................................................................................................ 21 9.2.1 Wolverine Metasedimentary Gneisses ..................................................................................... 24 9.2.1.1 Metawacke, Metapelite And Related Migmatites ................................................................. 24 9.2.1.2 Quartz Arenite And Quartz-Rich Metawacke ....................................................................... 26 9.2.1.3 Calcium-Rich Clastic Metasedimentary Rocks .................................................................... 26 9.2.1.4 Calc-Silicate Rocks And Marble........................................................................................... 26 9.2.1.5 Migmatized Tonalite And Quartz Diorite ............................................................................. 27 9.2.2 Felsic To Intermediate Intrusive Rocks ................................................................................... 28 9.2.2.1 Peraluminous, S-Type Granitic Pegmatites .......................................................................... 28 9.2.2.2 Wolverine Range Intrusive Suite .......................................................................................... 29 9.2.3 Mafic To Intermediate Intrusive Rocks ................................................................................... 30 9.2.3.1 M12000 Road Intrusive Complex ......................................................................................... 30 10. Deposit Types ............................................................................................................................. 31 11. Mineralization ............................................................................................................................. 34 11.1.1 Ursa Occurrence..................................................................................................................... 36 11.1.1.1 Mineral And Lithochemistry ............................................................................................... 41 11.1.2 Laura Occurrence ................................................................................................................... 43 11.1.2.1 Lithochemistry .................................................................................................................... 47 11.1.3 Pegmatite 541......................................................................................................................... 50 11.1.4 Will #1 And #2 Rare-Earth Element Occurrences ................................................................. 52 11.1.6 Summary Of Anomalous Rare-Earth Element Concentrations ............................................. 54 11.1.6.1 Bulk Rock Samples ............................................................................................................. 54 11.1.6.2 Summary Of Light Rare-Earth Element And Yttrium-Bearing Minerals Documented ByElectron Microprobe Analysis .......................................................................................................... 54  ii
  3. 3. 11.2.1 Cordierite-Orthoamphibole Lithologies Potentially Linked With Volcanogenic MassiveSulphide Mineralization .................................................................................................................... 55 12. EXPLORATION......................................................................................................................... 59 12.1 Geophysical Surveys ................................................................................................................. 60 12.1.1 Magnetic Surveys................................................................................................................... 60 12.1.2 Radiometric Surveys .............................................................................................................. 61 12.2 Soil Sample Surveys ................................................................................................................. 61 12.2.1 Laura Grid .............................................................................................................................. 61 12.2.2 Will #1 Grid ........................................................................................................................... 62 12.2.4 Ursa Grid ................................................................................................................................ 62 12.3 Stream Sediment Surveys ......................................................................................................... 62 12.4 Results ....................................................................................................................................... 62 13. DRILLING .................................................................................................................................. 65 14. Sample Method And Approach................................................................................................... 65 15. Sample Preparation, Analyses And Security .............................................................................. 65 15.1.1 Acme Analytical Laboratories Ltd. ........................................................................................ 67 15.1.2 ALS Chemex Laboratory Group ............................................................................................ 67 15.1.3 Activation Laboratories ......................................................................................................... 67 15.1.4 Geoscience Laboratories - Ontario Geological Survey .......................................................... 67 16. DATA Verification ..................................................................................................................... 70 16.3 Qualityassurance (QA) And Quality Control (QC) .................................................................. 75 16.3.1 Quality Control Procedures At Analytical Laboratories ........................................................ 77 16.3.1.1 Acme Analytical Laboratories ............................................................................................ 77 16.3.1.2 ALS Chemex Laboratory Group ......................................................................................... 78 16.3.1.4 Geoscience Laboratories - Ontario Geological Survey ....................................................... 79 17. Adjacent Properties ..................................................................................................................... 79 11.2.2.1 Allanite ................................................................................................................................ 83 11.2.2.2 Other Minerals .................................................................................................................... 86 18. Mineral Processing And Metallurgical Testing .......................................................................... 88 19. Mineral Resource And Mineral Reserve Estimates .................................................................... 88 20. Other Relevant Data And Interpretation ..................................................................................... 88 21. Interpretation And Conclusions .................................................................................................. 88 22. Recommendations ....................................................................................................................... 91 23. References ................................................................................................................................... 93 24. Certificate Of The Qualified Person ........................................................................................... 99 25. Date And Signature Page .......................................................................................................... 100 FIGURESFigure 1. Terranes and assemblages that comprise the western Cordillera of British Columbia and theYukon with location of the Mount Bisson rare-earth element property. Map source: Geological Surveyof Canada http://gsc.nran.gc.ca/cordgeo/terrane_e.php .................................................................... 20  iii
  4. 4. Figure 2. General geology of the Wolverine rare-earth-type pegmatite field that depict locations ofvarious mineral occurrences described in this report. The bold red line represents the outline of theMount Bisson claim-block. Details of the individual claims that comprise this block can be found inFigure 3b. Geology compiled and slightly modified after Ferri and Melville (1994) and Halleran(1991). ............................................................................................................................................... 21 Figure 3a. Locations of 2007 sample sites within and proximal to the Mount Bisson claim-group.Present outline of the claim-group is shown in red. Triangles give locations of all known rare-earthelement occurrences. The locations of samples collected in 2008 are given Figures 10 and 15. ..... 22 Figure 3b. Locations of 2010 sample sites and known rare-earth element mineral occurrences withinand adjacent to the Mount Bisson claim-group. This map also includes location of the Manson RiverEast Cu-W-Ag occurrence that lies adjacent to the claim-block. ..................................................... 23 Figure 4. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for various clastic metasedimentary rocks from theWolverine gneisses. .......................................................................................................................... 25 Figure 5. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for peraluminous, S-type granitic pegmatites of the MountBisson area. ....................................................................................................................................... 29 Figure 6. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for various units of the M-12000 Road intrusive complex. 31 Figure 7. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for all rock types from the Ursa occurrence. ................. 42 Figure 8. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for calc-silicate metasedimentary rocks of the Wolverinegneisses in the Mount Bisson area. ................................................................................................... 43 Figure 9. Sample locations for the Laura and Pegmatite 541 rare-earth element occurrences and fromadjacent exposures located near Mount Bisson superimposed upon total magnetic field map fromsurvey flown by Fugro Airborne Surveys Incorporated (Luckman 2006). The delineation of granitic-pegmatitic plutons of the Wolverine Range intrusive suite was derived from magnetic and geologicaldata. ................................................................................................................................................... 45 Figure 10. SiO2 versus K2O/Na2O for granitic and pegmatitic rocks from the Laura grid in comparisonto the average compositions of plutons from British Columbia associated with various types of skarnmineralization (Ray and Webster 1991). The dashed line represents interlayered syenite-trondhjemitecompositions (926520 and 926521) at the Laura REE occurrence. Average composition of the 1.7 GaBurstall pluton associated with U-REE skarn mineralization at the Mary-Kathleen deposit wasextracted from Australian Geoscience: http://www.ga.gov.au/image_cache/GA3785.pdf The author,however, is unable to verify the information in relation to the tonnage and average grade of the Mary-Kathleen U-REE deposit and therefore these data are not necessarily indicative of mineralization onthe Mount Bisson claim-group that is the subject of this technical report. ....................................... 48 Figure 11. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for units of the Laura #1 occurrence compared tomagnetite-titanite-biotite granite at nearby pluton of the Wolverine Range intrusive suite. ............ 49 Figure 12. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for granitic rocks, related pegmatites and diorite within thenorthwest area of the1988 Laura grid compared with magnetite-titanite-allanite-biotite granite from anearby pluton of the Wolverine Range intrusive suite (926524). ..................................................... 49 Figure 13. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for sodic granitic pegmatite (Pegmatite 541), andmetasomatized and unaltered Wolverine gneiss host-rocks compared to magnetite-titanite-allanite-biotite granite at nearby pluton of the Wolverine Range intrusive suite. .......................................... 52  iv
  5. 5. Figure 14. Sample sites in vicinity of the Will # 1 and Will # 2 rare-earth element occurrences andfrom the anthophyllite-corundum-cordierite-bearing gneiss localities superimposed upon the airbornemagnetic base of Fugro Airborne Surveys Ltd. ............................................................................... 55 Photo 18. False colour backscattered electron image showing mineralogy and textural relations ingarnet-anthophyllite-cordierite felsic gneiss at locality 08-FWB-10. ............................................... 58 Figure 15. Example of volcanogenic massive sulphide mineralization in the Saviankannas Zn-Cu-Agdeposit of Finland associated with metamorphosed alteration zones now characterized by cordierite-anthophyllite-bearing mineral assemblages. Image fromhttp://en.gtk.fi/ExplorationFindland/Commodities/Zinc/Saviankannas.html ................................... 59 Figure 16. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for Laura No. 1 and No. 2 occurrences on Mount Bissonthat compares the historical data of Halleran (1991) with that of Leighton (1997). ......................... 71 Figure 17. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for units of the M-12000 Road occurrence. Samples926530 and 926531 represent duplicate samples split in the field from a homogeneous, medium-grained unit (titanite-diopside quartz diorite) that were submitted to Acme Analytical Laboratories forexternal quality control assessment (see also Table 10). .................................................................. 83 PHOTOSPhoto 1. Good exposure of highly deformed and locally migmatized clastic metasedimentary rocks onthe Munro Camp Road. Arrow on the right side indicates a dyke of peraluminous, S-type pegmatiticgranite that is discordant to host-rock foliation and yet has been subjected to ductile deformation alongits contact. ......................................................................................................................................... 24 Photo 2. Highly tectonized layers of buff coloured quartz arenite (towards left side of photo) within adominant, dark brown sillimanite-biotite metapelite at locality 07-FWB-15. .................................. 26 Photo 3. Highly strained, migmatitic quartz diorite to tonalite with granite leucosomes in whichseverely flattened, isoclinal folds are barely discernible (as left of pencil). ..................................... 28 Photo 4. Small exposure of the potassic pegmatite core zone at the Ursa REE occurrence. The rock isstrongly deformed and exhibits a strong mineral stretching lineation in quartz and augen-shaped K-feldspar megacrysts. The lineation is parallel to the faint black line on the right part of outcrop. ... 37 Photo 5. Quartz-plagioclase<<diopside skarn vein system hosted in amphibolite and interlayered calc-silicate metasedimentary rocks at the Ursa occurrence. Strike of lithological layering is approximatelyparallel to long edge of photo with moderate dip towards the reader. .............................................. 38 Photo 6. Polished slab that reveals a sharp intrusive contact of the allanite-titanite-plagioclase borderzone of the Ursa pegmatite with an adjacent titanite-plagioclase-diopside skarn envelop (arrow). Notethe obliteration of host-rock foliation near contact versus its presence near edge of sample as markedby foliation symbol. .......................................................................................................................... 39 Photo 7. Black allanite and dark brown titanite in the plagioclase-rich border zone unit of the Ursagranitic pegmatite. Elongate grey quartz-rich domains define the mineral lineation. ...................... 40 Photo 8. Backscattered electron image of an allanite grain from the border zone of the Ursa pegmatite.The allanite is characterized by complex patchy zonation and a scalloped grain outline that suggestsresorption due to interaction with pegmatite-forming fluids. ........................................................... 40 Photo 9. Planar dyke of titanite-biotite-hornblende granite, likely related to the Wolverine Rangeintrusive suite, emplaced at high angle to lithologic layering of amphibolite (black unit along to right v
  6. 6. of contact) and roughly weathered, deeper black, calc-silicate metasedimentary host-rocks along leftside. ................................................................................................................................................... 41 Photo 10. View highly fractured magnetite-allanite-titanite-biotite granite at sample site 926524 in thesmaller of two plutons of the Wolverine Range intrusive suite near Mount Bisson. ........................ 44 Photo 11. Plagioclase-green diopside skarn masses with partial replacement along the margins of acoarse hornblende-bearing granitic pegmatite near locality 926520 at Laura occurrence. The slight ruststained skarn mass also contains quartz, allanite and titanite. .......................................................... 46 Photo 12. Abundant platy black allanite and orange-brown titanite in diopside-rich skarn (sample926540 in Appendices 4 and 5) from the Laura occurrence with the highest ∑REE content (7429 ppm)obtained to date by the author on the Mount Bisson claim-group. ................................................... 46 Photo 13: Cluster of bright orange titanite in Pegmatite 541, a sodic granitic pegmatite at site 926541near the Laura #1 occurrence. ........................................................................................................... 51 Photo 14. Metaultramafic unit with abundant magnetite intergrown with dark green amphibole, asaround area marked by coin, on a surface that exposes a pervasive, east-trending, shallow-plungingmineral lineation. Bulk rock analysis indicated 47 wt. % total iron as Fe2O3................................... 56 Photo 15. Anthophyllite gneiss unit marked by coarse poikiloblastic red garnet masses that in partreplaces radiating masses of deep brown anthophyllite. ................................................................... 56 Photo 16. Compositional layering exposed at the anthophyllite gneiss exposure. Intermediatecompositions at the right are characterized by abundant clotty linear aggregates of anthophyllite thatgrade into a very leucocratic unit with sparse anthophyllite. The leucocratic unit defines a tight foldwith a core zone, as marked by coin, rich in biotite with lesser hornblende, plagioclase and corundum. 57 Photo 17. Deformed enclave, marked by coin, rich in anthophyllite-gedrite with sparse magnetite andplagioclase......................................................................................................................................... 57 Photo 19. Aggregate of deep yellow-green hornblende and coexisting plagioclase, faint brown titaniteand sparse allanite enclosed within a quartz-rich pod from the calc-alkaline pegmatite at the M-12000Road occurrence................................................................................................................................ 81 Photo 20. Polished slab which reveals complex mineralogy in the calc-alkaline pegmatite system ofthe M-12000 Road rare-earth element occurrence. Allanite occurs as a cluster of dark brown grainswithin the epidote-diopside-rich mass towards the left side of the photo. Bulk rock analysis of a slicefrom this slab: ∑REE (1463 ppm), ∑HREE (123 ppm), Y (174 ppm) and W (600 ppm)............... 81 Photo 21. Backscattered electron image of an allanite grain from 148666-2. This image reveals acomplex evolutionary history: core with likely high REEoscillatory zoned rimreplacement zonewith patchy texturecorrosion by late magmatic fluids that produced a scalloped grain outline. .. 84 Photo 22. Backscattered electron image of a cluster of allanite (bright grains) that coexists withfluorapatite (dull grey) and plagioclase (dark areas)......................................................................... 84 Photo 23. X-Ray map for magnesium versus cerium versus phosphorus showing a cluster of allanitegrains (green) mainly in plagioclase (dark area) but also as inclusions in fluorapatite (blue) anddiopside (crimson). ........................................................................................................................... 85 Photo 24. X-Ray map for cerium versus titanium versus phosphorus that reveals a relatively coarsegrain of allanite (green) that coexists with titanite (red) and fluorapatite (blue). The areas of brightgreen correspond to highest cerium levels and darker green zones have lower cerium and elevatediron. ................................................................................................................................................... 85  vi
  7. 7. Photo 25. Backscattered electron image that reveals remnants of vesuvianite enveloped by calciumcarbonate alteration that was subsequently locally replaced by iron-rich alteration. The two alterationevents were overprinted by euhedral crystals of oscillatory zoned epidote. The cores and some outerzones of the epidote are enriched in Y2O3 (light areas in grains) as at arrow. .................................. 87 Photo 26. X-ray map for iron versus cerium versus calcium that reveals an alteration sequence markedby calcium carbonate replacement of diopside and vesuvianite by followed by late iron-richreplacement. Several grains of allanite (green) occur as inclusions within an unaltered part of adiopside grain. ................................................................................................................................... 87 TABLESTable 1: Mean values and ranges for total REE, Light REE, Heavy REE and Yttrium in rare-earthelement pegmatites of the Wolverine group based upon historical exploration data. ....................... 19 Table 2. Summary of highest total rare-earth element contents in bulk rock samples from variousoccurrences on the Mount Bisson claim-group. The enrichment factor was computed by division ofsample total rare-earth content of sample by the average upper continental crust ∑REE value of 146ppm in Taylor and McLennan (1985, p.46). ..................................................................................... 36 Table 3. Summary of total rare-earth element content (ppm), yttrium (ppm) and chondrite normalizedLa/Yb and Eu/Eu* ratios from various units of the Ursa REE occurrence. ...................................... 41 Table 4. Summary of averages and ranges for ∑ La2O3+Ce2O3+Pr2O3+Nd2O3, ThO2 and UO2 (wt.%oxide) in allanite from the Laura and Pegmatite 541 occurrences and the Wolverine Range intrusivesuite. .................................................................................................................................................. 50 Table 5. Means and ranges of Y2O3 in allanite, epidote, titanite and vesuvianite in weight percentoxide from four sample localities in the Mount Bisson area. Data from the Laura occurrence are fromRussell, Groat and Halleran (1994, p.276). N = number of analyses. .............................................. 54 Table 6: Means and ranges for ΣREE and Y in samples from the Ursa rare-earth element occurrencecompared to the historical data. Concentrations given in ppm unless reported in weight percent. .. 72 Table 7: Means and ranges for ΣREE and Y in samples from the Laura rare-earth element occurrencecompared to the historical data. Concentrations given in ppm unless reported in weight percent. .. 72 Table 8. Duplicate analysis of various trace elements in split of biotite lamprophyre (148654) byActivation Laboratories Ltd. and ALS Chemex Laboratories. ......................................................... 73 Table 9. Duplicate analysis of various trace elements in split of titanite-diopside quartz diorite(926530 and 926531) submitted to Acme Laboratories. ................................................................... 74 Table 10. Analyses (ppm) of grab samples from sulphide mineralization associated with mafic tointermediate intrusive rocks on the M-12000 Road. ......................................................................... 80 APPENDICESAppendix 1. Compilation of historical bulk rock composition data…………………………............101Appendix 2. Bulk rock 2007 composition data (Activation Labs Ltd and ALS Chemex LabsLtd).......................................................................................................................................................106Appendix 3. Electron microprobe 2007 mineral composition data......................................................122 vii
  8. 8. Appendix 4. Bulk rock composition 2008-2009 data (Acme Analytical Labs Ltd and GeoscienceLaboratories of Ontario Geological Survey)………………………………………………................138Appendix 5. Electron microprobe 2008 allanite composition data……………………….…….........162Appendix 6. Mineral Identification by X-Ray Diffraction and SEM-EDS..........................................172 viii
  9. 9. 3. SUMMARYThis report documents an initial investigation of the geology, mineralogy, petrochemistry andeconomic geology of the Mount Bisson claim-group, which comprises 12 contiguous claims (area of3862.56 hectares) situated 65 km northwest of Mackenzie, B.C. The property is currently the subject ofa joint-venture agreement in which Seymour Ventures Corporation may acquire a 60% ownership fromPaget Minerals Corporation upon fullfillment of terms in this agreement. Thus, this report is submittedto the TSX-V exchange as part of an acquistion transaction. All geological, geochemical andgeophysical work was undertaken by the vendor Paget Minerals Corporation. Under Section 6.2 (2) ofNI 43-101, the property is classified as an “early stage exploration property”. Seasonal weatherconditions (snow cover) prevented the author from accessing the property and obtaining surfacesamples, particularly from the Central Occurrence, at the time of the request from the issuer. The issuerintends to rectify the necessity for a site inspection by the author during the 2011 field season.Focus of the present work was upon rare-earth element mineralization developed in granitic pegmatitesand associated metasomatic alteration that comprises the Wolverine pegmatite field of Černý (2005).The purpose of this investigation is to examine accessible rare-earth element mineralization of theMount Bisson claim-group and to undertake a bedrock chemical and mineralogical data-base that willfacilitate exploration for rare-earth elements in the area.The rare-earth granitic pegmatites of the area belong to the NYF-geochemical family (Niobium-Yttrium-Fluorine) that have been classified by Černý (2005) and Ercit (2005) as Abyssal class, AB-LREE subclass. The rare-earth element mineralization of the 3 by 9 km Wolverine pegmatite field, asnamed by Černý (2005), comprises granitic pegmatites and metasomatized host-rocks of the Wolverinegneisses that form a high grade metamorphic portion of the Upper Proterozoic Ingenika group in theOmineca crystalline complex (Mansy and Gabrielse 1978) and is known as the Wolverinemetamorphic complex (Ferri and Melville 1994).Granitic pegmatites of the abyssal class occur in upper amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphicterrain and supposedly bear a connection to anatectic leucosome (Černý 2005). Examples in Canadainclude the Parry Sound, Hybla and Madawaska districts of Ontario and the Evans-Lou and Lapointequarries in Quebec (Černý 2005).The Wolverine gneisses consist of a mélange of clastic metasedimentary rocks interlayered withcarbonate-rich lithologies (marble, calc-silicate rocks) and mafic gneisses that have endured high grademetamorphism, severe ductile deformation and local partial melting that occurred during the middleJurassic. The clastic metasedimentary rocks reveal localized partial melting in metawacke andmetapelite compositions that produced in situ and intrusive masses of S-type, peraluminous, pegmatiticgranites.Later granitic rocks of the I-type, 72.6±0.2 Ma Wolverine intrusive suite crosscut the structural fabricin the Wolverine gneisses and locally generated metasomatic skarn envelopes in calcareousmetasedimentary host-rocks as at the Ursa rare-earth element occurrence. The intrusive rocks exhibit acompositional spectrum of granite, quartz monzonite, quartz diorite, diorite and calc-alkalic graniticpegmatite.The initial discovery of rare-earth element mineralization was made by Halleran (1987a, b, c and 1991)and was evaluated by detailed mapping, petrography, litho- and mineral chemical work. Total rare-element element content of bulk rock samples was found to range from 0.03 to 13.5 wt.% (Halleran(1991 and Table 1) with the highest levels found at the Laura No.1 and No.2 occurrences on MountBisson. 9
  10. 10. Five rare-earth element mineralized localities (Laura, Ursa, Will # 1 and 2 and the M12000 Roadoccurrences) were examined in this work that involve three distinct geological settings.  Granitic to syenitic, I-type intrusive rocks and related pegmatite that are interlayered with allanite-diopside-rich skarns, ostensibly controlled by the contact between the Wolverine Range intrusive suite and highly deformed diorite gneiss and calc-silicate rocks of the Wolverine gneiss unit (Laura rare-earth element occurrence)  Peraluminous, S-type pegmatitic granite hosted in calc-silicate and psammitic-metapelitic metasedimentary rocks of the Ingenika group (Ursa rare-earth element occurrence), and,  Late, undeformed, calc-alkaline, quartz-rich pegmatites and associated diopside-rich alteration in host diorite and quartz diorite (M-12000 Road rare-earth element occurrence).The M12000 Road occurrence, discovered in 2007 by the author, originally was situated on claim568837 of Paget Minerals Corporation within a contiguous 22 claim block at Mount Bisson anddropped by the vendor prior to the Seymour Ventures transaction. This mineral occurrence now lies onclaim 842836 (claim name CLONE 4) that is 456.87 hectares in area and belongs to A.R. Schindel asdetermined by a search at https://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca/mtov/searchTenures.doThe author cautions that the rare-earth element mineralization at this occurrence is not necessarilyindicative of that found on the adjacent Mount Bisson claim-group. Description of the M12000 Roadoccurrence can be found in Section 17: Adjacent Properties.The Laura occurrence is genetically affiliated with relatively undeformed, I-type granitic rocks of theWolverine Range intrusive suite that are exposed proximal to the rare-earth element mineralized zonenear Mount Bisson. Localization of the mineralization (512 to 7429 ppm total REE) is evident in sheetsof allanite-bearing syenite and titanite-plagioclase-diopside skarn that are concordant to the flat-lyingplanar deformation fabric in diorite and quartz diorite in the host Wolverine gneisses.The Ursa occurrence, with a range of 54 to 667 ppm total REE, reveals field evidence for allanitemineralization associated with weakly peraluminous, S-type, granitic magmatism. Such rocks wereplausibly generated by partial melting of a metapelite protolith, a common rock type in the Ingenikagroup. The mineralization occurs in an allanite-titanite-biotite-bearing, zoned potassic pegmatite thathas undergone extensive ductile deformation and lies concordant to its amphibolite-calc-silicate-marblehost-rocks.The mineralization consists of black allanite and orange titanite that is mainly confined to a narrow,plagioclase-rich border zone (667 ppm total REE) attendant to a diopside-rich skarn selvedge in calc-silicate host-rocks. The biotite potassic pegmatite core zone contains anomalous but a lower total REEcontent (370 ppm).The M-12000 Road rare-earth element occurrence, found during this work, consists of vein systems ofundeformed, quartz-rich, titanite-diopside calc-alkaline pegmatite (2 to 3 m width over minimum 5 mstrike) hosted within lineated, titanite-hornblende diorite and quartz diorite.The mineralization at the M12000 Road occurrence consists of calc-silicate pods within diopside-richquartz-rich segregations. These pods contain between 871 and 1463 ppm total REE, and exhibit verycomplex mineralogy characterized by Y-epidote, allanite, titanite, vesuvianite and scheelite associatedwith bright green diopside. Bulk rock values of 871 to 1463 ppm total REE occur in such zones with a 10
  11. 11. notable content of 123 ppm total HREE and 174 ppm yttrium. These results indicate a potential forheavy rare-earth element mineralization in the M-12000 pegmatite system.The allanite subgroup [(Ca,Ce,Y)2 (Al,Fe3+)3Si3O12(OH)] of the epidote group is the main rare-earthelement mineral of economic interest although subordinate concentrations of the rare-earth elementscan occur in coexisting titanite, fluorapatite and epidote. Electron microprobe analyses of allanite fromrare-earth element occurrences near Mount Bisson reveal an average La2O3+Ce2O3+Pr2O3+Nd2O3 of20.3 wt.% and low to modest contents of deleterious elements such as ThO2 and UO2.The Central Occurrence was discovered by T. Barresi during 2010 field work and one grab samplefrom a 15 cm wide, allanite-rich, melanocratic pod hosted in biotite-bearing quartzofeldspathic gneissproduced a ∑REE value of 8.64 wt.% (Paget Minerals Corp. News-Release, August 25, 2010), thesecond highest documented in the claim-block to date in a database that includes the historicalanalyses (see Appendix 1).However, the author cautions that this site has not been examined by aqualified person and will be subject of an investigation by the author, as requested by the issuer, in the2011 field season. Under Section 6.2 (2) of NI 43-101, the property is classified as an “early stageexploration property”. Seasonal weather conditions (snow cover) prevented the author from accessingthe property and obtaining surface samples at the time of the request from the issuer.No general exploration concept can be employed as the granite-related, rare-earth elementmineralization occurs in three distinct lithologic associations, as outlined above. Rather, explorationshould focus upon the particular rare-earth element-granite association of interest and its inferredgenetic history.Further exploration is highly recommended for the claim-group that includes follow-up evaluation ofCentral occurrence and systematic sampling and mapping of the Laura No.1 and No.2 and Will No.1and No.2 occurrences. Bulk rock chemistry and soil sampling that focuses upon pathfinder elementsBa, Sr, Ce, Nb and Th could prove useful in the exploration for I-type related rare-earth elementmineralization exemplified by the Laura #1 occurrence.4. INTRODUCTION AND TERMS OF REFERENCE4.1 IntroductionSeymour Ventures Corporation is a public company existing under the laws of Canada and listed onthe TSX-Venture Exchange (TSX-V: SEY). The company currently has no mineral properties but is inthe process of property acquisition as reported in its November 17, 2010 press release and also byPaget Minerals Corporation in its November 18, 2010 News-release.The purpose of this technical report is to support a submission with the TSX-Venture exchange thatinvolves a 60/40 joint venture agreement respectively between Seymour Ventures Corporation (TSX-V:SEY) [‘Seymour’] and Paget Minerals Corporation [‘Paget’] whereby Seymour may acquire a 60%interest in Paget’s Mount Bisson and Xeno rare-earth element properties in B.C. The financial detailsof this proposed joint venture are given in Section 6. The Xeno property in the Dease Lake area ofB.C. will not be discussed in this report and the author has not visited this property.Paget Minerals Corporation is a public mineral exploration company that was incorporated in BritishColumbia on May 4, 2005 and was listed on the TSX Venture Exchange (TSX-V: PGS) on August 24, 11
  12. 12. 2009. The company has a diverse portfolio of properties range from precious, base metals, and rare-earth element deposits in British Columbia and in the Canadian Shield of eastern Canada.4.2 Terms of ReferenceSeymour Ventures Corporation requested that the author undertake an independent technicalassessment of the Mount Bisson rare-earth element property on November 25, 2010 and prepare areport in compliance with the standards of the Canadian Securities Administrators’ National Instrument43-101 (“NI 43-101”). Two periods of field investigation, which totalled 11 days, were undertaken bythe author in October 2007 and in July 2008. The scope of these investigations involved geological andmineralogical examination and sampling of accessible outcrops over the claim-block and examinationand sampling of the historical rare-earth element occurrences (Ursa and Laura) along with a REEoccurrence. Two occurrences (Will #1 and 2) could not be located due to dense second growth forestcovering large areas in vicinity of the historical showings.A third period of surface geological and geochemical work was undertaken from July 2 to 15, 2010 byT. Barresi, a graduate student at Dalhousie University, and under the supervision of J. Bradford, P. Geoof Paget Minerals Corp. This work was done independent of the author, although five reference grabsamples, analyzed by ALS Chemex Labs, were sent to the author in September 2010 for petrographicexamination. The results from one sample E922522 in this work are included in this report (see CentralOccurrence in Section 11.1.5).The revision of this 43-101 report did not involve a field examination by the author of the 2010 surfacework conducted by Paget Minerals Corporation as seasonal weather conditions in the Mount Bissonarea rendered access impossible due to heavy snow cover. This is in accordance with Section 6.2 (2) ofNI 43-101 that classifies the property as early exploration stage. Under Section 6.2 (2) of NI 43-101,the property is classified as an "early stage exploration property". Seasonal weather conditions (snowcover) prevented the author from accessing the property and obtaining surface samples at the time ofthe request from the issuer. The issuer will request that a site inspection be undertaken by the author assoon as practicable during the 2011 field season and file a revised technical report in due course.Major, minor and trace element analyses of 100 grab samples were undertaken by four certified,commercial labs [Acme Analytical Laboratories Ltd. (“Acme”), ALS Chemex Laboratory Group(“ALS Chemex”), Activation Laboratories (“Actlabs”) and the Ontario Geoscience Laboratory (“OGSLabs”)]. These samples involved the Laura #1 and Pegmatite 541 in addition to the M-12000 REEoccurrence discovered during the author’s investigations. Verification of the mineral compositions atthese occurrences was undertaken by Dr. Andrew G. Tindle, a geoscientist at the Department of EarthSciences of The Open University, U.K., who has about 30 years experience in the mineralogy of rare-metal mineralization. Verification of the mineralogical species present and their compositions wasundertaken with a Cameca SX-100 electron microprobe. Mineral identification was also undertaken atthe Geoscience Labs of the Ontario Geological Survey.The author is independent of the Issuer Seymour Ventures Corporation and also independent of PagetMinerals Corp and Pembrook Mining and has no material interest in these firms or in any of theirmineral properties. To the authors knowledge, there has been no material change to the Mount Bissonproperty in terms of follow-up exploration. Previously a change in ownership had been undertaken asdetailed in Section 2 that involved Pembrook Mining Corporation and Paget Minerals Corporation.The author is a practicing member in good standing with the Association of Professional Geoscientistsof Ontario (member #760). 12
  13. 13. 4.3 Sources of informationThe technical information used in this report was provided by Paget Minerals Corporation and alsofrom assessment files (MINFILE) of the British Columbia Department of Mines and PetroleumResources, various publications relating to government sponsored geological work in the area, theunpublished 1991 M.Sc. thesis of A.A.D. Halleran, and two peer-reviewed geological journalpublications (Russell, Groat and Halleran 1994) and Halleran and Russell (1996). Files on possiblysimilar rare-earth element mineralization such as the Mary-Kathleen U-REE and Hoidas Lake REEdeposits were also obtained via internet searches.The author has assumed and relied upon the fact that all historical technical information listed in the“References” section are accurate and represent the best practices of the industry standards of the time.However, while a careful review of these data was undertaken, the author cannot guarantee theiraccuracy and completeness.Mineral tenure status was checked by the author at the site of Mineral Tenures Online BC athttps://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca:443/mtov/home.do5. RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTSThe main sources of information in this report are in the public domain as assessment files and mapsfrom MINFILE, unpublished M.Sc thesis of A.A.D. Halleran (1991), and publications of the B.C.Department of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources. Other files on comparative deposit-types wereobtained from internet searches.The Mount Bisson property was examined for a total of 11 days via field work in 2007 and 2008. Thefield work was planned by the author. A further 14 days of field work was undertaken from July 2 to15, 2010, by T. Barresi, a Ph.D. candidate at Dalhousie University. Mr. Barresi was under thesupervision of J. Bradford, P. Geo. of Paget Minerals Corp. and was not supervised by the author.The author assumes and relies upon the fact that all historical technical information, as listed in theReferences section, is accurate and represents the best practices of industry standards at that time.However, while a careful review of these data was undertaken, the author cannot guarantee theiraccuracy.The documentation of claim status was undertaken online athttps://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca:443/mtov/home.do but not verified with the B.C. provincialgovernment as the author is not qualified to validate the legal ownership of the property and thereforecannot take any legal responsibility on this issue.The author is not aware of any surface rights issues or environmental liabilities associated with theproperty. No past mining activity has occurred within the current property area. No exploration follow-up work has occurred subsequent to the author’s last field examination in July of 2008.The author is not aware of any existing technical data other than provided by the company or thatwithin the public domain. Material changes have occurred subsequent to the author’s fieldexaminations and the 2010 field examination undertaken by T. Barresi. The first material changedinvolved a change of ownership and the shares involved may be subject to escrow restrictions imposedby the TSX Venture Exchange (Paget News-release November 24, 2009). 13
  14. 14. The second material change involves an option agreement between Paget Minerals Corporation andSeymour Ventures Corporation (TSX-V: SEY) as announced in the November 18, 2010 News-releaseof Paget Minerals Corp.6. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATIONThe claim-group, which lies within the Omineca Mining District of north-central British Columbia, issituated 65 km northwest of the town of Mackenzie in the Swanell Mountains of the Omenica Ranges.The claim-group occurs within map-sheets 093N/9, 093O/5, and 093O/12 of the National TopographicSystem (NTS).The centre of the property is approximately at 438 000 E/615 000N UniverseTransverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates in Zone 10, NAD83.The property initially consisted of 22 contiguous claims that were staked on November 2, 2005 andOctober 29, 2007 as verified at Mineral Tenures Online BC athttps://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca:443/mtov/home.do The writer assumes that the locations of the claim-posts and claim-lines were accomplished by GPSdevices with the claim-lines blazed and flagged but his could not be verified, although a standardpractice in the mineral industry.The locations of all known mineral occurrences within the claim-block are presented in Figures 2 and3b that comprise the Laura #1 Laura #2, Ursa, Will #1, Will #2 and Central rare-earth elementoccurrences. GPS data in the Universal Transverse Mercator system (UTM) on all samples collectedcan be found in Appendices 2, 4, and 5.The Mount Bisson property is 100 % owned by Paget Minerals Corporation. However, anannouncement in a November 18, 2010 News-release by the company indicated that Seymour VenturesCorp. can acquire a 60% interest in the Mount Bisson and Xeno properties by fullfilling terms of thejoint venture agreement as detailed below. The property currently consists of 12 claims situated in theOmineca Mining Division northwest of the town of Mackenzie. Previously, Paget Minerals Corp.,announced in a November 24, 2009 News-release of the acquisition of a 100% interest in 22 claimsfrom Pembrook Mining Corp. ("Pembrook") covering 9,096 hectares located in the Omineca MiningDivision, British Columbia, known as the Mt. Bisson Property. As consideration for the acquisition ofa 100% ownership of the Property, Paget has agreed to issue 1,875,000 common shares to Pembrookwithin ten days of receiving TSX Venture Exchange approval to the letter agreement; these shares maybe subject to escrow restrictions imposed by the TSX Venture Exchange. This transfer of shares inregards to the Paget Minerals Corp. - Pembrook Mining Corp. transaction has been effected (D.Volkert, Paget Minerals Corp., personal communication, February 15, 2011). There are no royalties,back-in rights, payments or other agreements and encumbrances to which the property is subjectbetween Seymour and PagetIn addition, the Property shall be subject to a 2% net smelter returns royalty (NSR) in favour ofPembrook. Paget shall be entitled to purchase, at any time, one half of the NSR by paying Pembrookthe sum of $1,000,000.The recent 60/40 joint venture agreement between Seymour and Paget was announced on November18, 2010 in a Paget News-release: “Seymour will pay $62,500 and issue 100,000 common shares ofSeymour to Paget upon receipt of applicable regulatory approvals. An additional $62,500 will bepayable to Paget on the first, second and third anniversaries of the option, together with an additional100,000, 150,000 and 200,000 common shares of Seymour, respectively.Pursuant to the option agreement, Seymour will be required to fund a $1,050,000 work program over 3 14
  15. 15. years on the properties. Paget will retain a 100% interest in the properties until all of the abovepayments, work programs and share issuances are completed. In the event that Seymour exercises theoption, a 60/40 joint venture is deemed to be created to further develop the properties, with each partycontributing to their pro-rata portion of approved exploration programs. If either party decides not tocontribute to the joint venture and is diluted down to a 10% interest, their interest will convert to a 2%Net Smelter Royalty (NSR), 1% of which may be purchased at the other partys option for$1,000,000.”Mineral tenure status was checked by the author at Mineral Tenures Online BC athttps://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca:443/mtov/home.do with the information below as extracted from thean Excel file from this website and all claims are currently in good standing until February 24, 2012.However, a legal opinion has not been sought in regards to the status of these claims. The claim-group,which is shown in detail in Figure 3b, covers a total area of 3862.56 hectares. Tenure Name Owner Expiry Date Status Area (hectares) 522746 BISS 2 213190 2012/feb/24 GOOD 439.15 (100%) 522756 LAURA 4 213190 2012/feb/25 GOOD 109.9372 (100%) 522749 BISS 4 213190 2012/feb/26 GOOD 54.8499 (100%) 522755 LAURA 3 213190 2012/feb/27 GOOD 329.8395 (100%) 522745 BISS 1 213190 2012/feb/28 GOOD 329.6985 (100%) 522751 LAURA 1 213190 2012/feb/29 GOOD 457.899 (100%) 522747 BISS 3 213190 2012/feb/30 GOOD 384.0415 (100%) 522753 LAURA 2 213190 2012/feb/31 GOOD 457.701 (100%) 568815 YETI 2 213190 2012/feb/32 GOOD 146.346 (100%) 547760 BISS 5 213190 2012/feb/33 GOOD 457.5892 (100%) 568812 YETI 1 213190 2012/feb/34 GOOD 237.9224 (100%) 547761 BISS 6 213190 2012/feb/35 GOOD 457.5832 (100%) TOTAL 3862.5574The author is unaware of issues, environmental liabilities or encumbrances in regards to these claims.Permits to undertake the recommended exploration work, as per Section 22, will be obtained by theissuer upon completion of the joint venture agreement with Paget Minerals Corporation. In order toobtain the permits, the issuer needs to make a proper application to the applicable government agency. 15
  16. 16. 7. ACCESSIBILITY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES,INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHYThe Mount Bisson claim-group is situated in the Swannell Ranges of the Omineca Mountainsphysiographic region (Holland 1976) in north-central B.C. (Figure 1) and adjacent to the southeasternmargins of the northern Rocky Mountain trench, the most striking physiographic feature of the region.The elevations within the claim-group vary from about 1600 m at the summit of Mount Bisson to about1000 m at the lowest elevations at Munro Creek.The claim-group is situated 65 km northwest of the town of Mackenzie and peripheral parts of theclaim-group are readily accessible by a 120 km drive from via a network of generally well maintained,gravel base logging roads that infiltrate the region, i.e., the Mackenzie, Manson River, Munro Campand Nation River forestry service roads.The main service centre for the region is the town of Mackenzie with a population of 5,450 that islocated within the Rocky Mountain Trench at the southern end of Williston Lake, one of the largestman-made reservoirs in North America. The town was named after the famous explorer AlexanderMackenzie, who camped near the town site on his journey to the Pacific in 1793. The economy of thetown is mainly supported by two pulp and paper operations and by tourism.The town of Mackenzie, at 701 m elevation, lies in the Northern and Central Plateaux and Mountainsclimatic zone that is marked by a range in January temperatures of -7 to -14 C and July temperatures of8 to 20 C. Summers are short, generally cool with little precipitation.The claim-group lies in the Subalpine Forest vegetation region in which the characteristic dominantspecies are Englemann spruce (Picea engelmannii), Alpine fir (Picea alpestris) and Lodgepole pine(Pinus contorta).The Ursa and M-12000 Road occurrences are readily accessible by logging roads. Access to the Laura#1 and #2 occurrences is not possible by road, however, a recent logging road that branches off theMunro Creek Road at UTM 438177E/6150313N (Zone 10) provides access within 2 km of theseoccurrences. Access to the Central occurrence can be gained by a 1 km traverse northeast from a recentlogging road that ends on claim 522753 (Figure 3b). Helicopter service is available at Mackenzie andaffords the best means of access to the higher elevations as around Mount Bisson that include theLaura occurrences.The nearest source of hydro-electric power is situated 120 km via road at Mackenzie. Power needed tosupport a mining project would thus require alternative energy sources such as diesel poweredgenerators.The claim-block is quite hilly with a maximum relief of 600 m and thus only a few areas could supporta mining operation such in the nearby Munro Creek Valley adjacent to Munro Camp. This area couldalso be utililized as a site for infrastructure for extraction of ore minerals and as a despository fortailings. A relatively flat ridge lies in the immediate area adjacent to the Laura occurrence near MountBisson and could support mining operations with development of a road east from the aforementionedlogging road. However, processing of ore would require a nearby source of water, as in Munro Creekvalley that is not available in sufficient volume in the area covered by this flat ridge. This valley wouldserve as potential waste disposal area for tailings.Several streams, such as the Manson River and its tributary Munro Creek, flow all year and couldprovide sources of water. Personnel required to run the mining operations could be hired in Mackenzieand Prince George. Esker deposits of sand and gravel are present in the area and may serve as 16
  17. 17. aggregate for road-building related to mineral development. The length of a normal field season runsfrom late June to late September as road access is impacted by snow cover especially at higherelevations.8. HISTORYRecorded mineral exploration in the area proximal to the Mount Bisson claim-group commenced withdiscovery of graphite at the Mon occurrence near Munro Creek by Halleran (1985). Rare-earthmineralization was subsequently discovered and staked in the Mount Bisson area in 1986 and 1987 byHalleran (1988a). The initial discovery was made at the Ursa occurrence on Munro Creek that wasfollowed by further discoveries in 1987 at the Laura No.1 and No. 2 occurrences on the flanks ofMount Bisson (Halleran 1988b) and the Will No.1 and No. 2 occurrences, situated 7 km to thenorthwest near the Manson River, in 1988 (Halleran 1988c).A prospector syndicate led by A. Halleran undertook detailed geological mapping, scintillometersurveys and soil sampling over four small grids and optioned the claim-groups to Chevron MineralsLimited (Halleran 1988b, c). Further geological mapping on the Laura grid was undertaken in 1989(Halleran 1989). A summary of the geology, mineralogy and lab analytical work in regards to the fiverare-earth mineral occurrences was presented in the 1989 annual fieldwork report of the BritishColumbia Geological Survey Branch (Halleran and Russell 1990). This work was funded in part by afame grant of the BC government. The extensive work of Halleran on the Mount Bisson area rare-earthmineralization culminated in a M.Sc. thesis (Halleran 1991) and two peer-reviewed publications:Russell, Groat and Halleran (1994) and Halleran and Russell (1996).The analytical work undertaken by Halleran (1991, p. 29-56) from four rare-element occurrencesproduced 31 bulk rock compositions of grab samples augmented by 429 electron microprobe analysisof major rock-forming minerals (apatite, aegerine-augite, biotite, diopside-hedenbergite, hornblende,K-feldspar, plagioclase and titanite). These data include twelve electron microprobe compositions ofthe allanite subgroup of the epidote mineral group as defined by Giere and Sorenson 2004 andArmbruster 2006. The historical bulk rock composition data are given in Appendix 1 and summarizedin Table 1. It should be noted that all samples selected during Halleran’s work are grab samples withno photographic documentation of the outcrops sampled. More detail on the results of the ChevronMinerals and A.A.D Halleran exploration work can be found in Table of section 9 and sections 11 and12.Exploration work on the rare-earth mineralization subsequently remained quiescent after 1989 exceptfor a property examination by Leighton (1997) undertaken for the Argonauts Group Limited thatinvolved a brief inspection of the geology and analyses of four grab rock samples from the Laura No.1occurrence. These claims subsequently lapsed and were re-staked by Paget Minerals Corporation in2005 and additional claims were added in 2007 that currently represent a group of 12 contiguousclaims with a 100 percent ownership by the company.During October 2 to 8, 2006 an airborne magnetic-radiometric survey was conducted over the propertyby Fugro Airborne Surveys Ltd. that involved 595 line-kilometres (see Section 21.1 for detailedinformation).There has been no mining development or any historical resource estimates of any mineralization-typeon the claim-group. 17
  18. 18. 9. GEOLOGICAL SETTING9.1 Regional geologyThe Mount Bisson property is situated in the Ingenika group of the Omineca crystalline belt initiallydefined by Gabrielse (1975) and subsequently divided into four groups by Mansy and Gabrielse(1978). The Germansen Landing-Manson Creek area was the focus of a 4 year, 1:50 000 scale regionalgeological mapping project by Ferri and Melville (1988, 1989, 1994) and the southeast corner of thismap area covers parts of claims 522746, 522747 and 522749 of the Mount Bisson property. Thisproject also included stream sediment and bulk rock analysis and a revision of MINFILE mineralinventory of the area and available at http://www.em.gov.bc.ca/mining/GeolSurv/Minfile/ . Otherwiseno government sponsored geological mapping has been undertaken on the rest of the claim-group sinceTipper et al. (1974).The Ingenika group is interpreted as Upper Proterozoic in age by Ferri and Melville (1988) and formspart of the Cassiar continental margin assemblage (Colpron, Nelson and Murphy 2006) that is part of awidespread zone of clastic metasedimentary rocks that stretches from southeastern British Columbia tothe northwestern Yukon (Roots 1988). This assemblage represents crustal rocks displaced from theancestral North American cratonic margin (Figure 1). In the project area, the Cassiar terrane compriseslithologies that were complexly deformed and subjected to regional metamorphism during the middleto Late Jurassic (Parrish 1979; Ferri and Melville 1994).The term “Wolverine Metamorphic Complex” was employed by Ferri and Melville (1988; 1994) inreference to a 5 to 50 by 150 km area of the Ingenika group rocks subjected to high-grademetamorphism and severe deformation such that protolith recognition is difficult or impossible. Theterm “Wolverine gneisses” will be used in this report in reference to the highly deformed andmetamorphosed lithologies within this complex (Ferri and Melville, 1988, p. 4) that locally have beensubjected to partial melting. The Ingenika group lies in structural contact to the west with the SlideMountain terrane that is much lower in metamorphic grade.Granitic pegmatites of peraluminous composition and S-type characteristics (e.g., Breaks and Moore1992) were plausibly generated during the middle Jurassic by partial melting of metawacke-metapeliteprotoliths of the Wolverine gneisses. These distinctively white pegmatites are deformed, generallysubconcordant to the enclosing host rock foliation and exhibit boudinage and strong mineral stretchinglineations. Peraluminous minerals indicative of S-type granitic magmatism, such as sillimanite,andalusite, garnet and tourmaline, are particularly prominent at locality 07-FWB-06.Plutons interpreted as Late Cretaceous age and younger were also delineated by (Ferri and Melville1988; 1994, p. 54-55) and are widely emplaced in the Wolverine gneisses. These rocks, grouped intothe Wolverine Range intrusive suite (Ferri and Melville 1994, p. 56) comprise batholiths, stocks andnarrow dykes of massive and weakly foliated biotite granite and granodiorite and related pegmatite thatcommonly contain peraluminous minerals (muscovite and garnet).The largest member of this group is an 8 by 10 km pluton of biotite granite and granodiorite situatedproximal to the Manson River that was delineated but unnamed by Ferri and Melville (1988). Theauthor has given the name “Chamberland Creek pluton” to this mass that has a southern lobe situatedwithin two km of the Wolverine pegmatite field (Figure 2). A U/Pb monazite age of 72.6±0.2 Ma wasdetermined by Ferri and Melville (1994, p. 56). 18
  19. 19. In vicinity of Mount Bisson, smaller masses of syenite, monzonite, quartz monzonite, diorite andquartz diorite, up to 0.8 by 3 km in size, occur adjacent to the Laura No. 1 and No. 2 occurrences(Figure 2) and were termed the “Mount Bisson intrusions” by Halleran (1991, p. 4). Similar rocks wereencountered in the present work near the Manson River (locality 07-FWB-03) and about 2 km north ofthe Will No.1 and No.2 occurrences (localities 07-FWB-08, -10, -11 and -12). No absolute agedeterminations are available for these rocks and are regarded by Ferri and Melville (1994, p. 55) asCretaceous or Tertiary in age. These plutons have been grouped into the Wolverine Range intrusivesuite in this report.Table 1: Mean values and ranges for total REE, Light REE, Heavy REE and Yttrium in rare-earth element pegmatites of theWolverine group based upon historical exploration data. Occurrence ∑REE range ∑LREE range ∑HREE range Y range n Laura No. 1 1.72 0.11 - 1.71 0.11- 83 ppm 11-360 71 ppm 12-282 21 and 2 13.50 13.47 ppm ppm Laura No.1 1.62 1.36- 0.59 0.57- 1.02 0.76- 1.53 1.40- 4 (Leighton 1.93 0.62 1.31 1.93 1997) Ursa 0.8 0.03- 0.79 0.03- 90 ppm 24-197 94 ppm 41-193 3 2.14 2.12 ppm ppm Will No. 1 0.51 0.14- 0.5 0.12- 95 ppm 82- 77 ppm 73-80 3 0.85 0.84 107ppm ppm Will No. 2 0.1 22 ppm 1.13 237ppm- 61 ppm 7-166 4 to 0.36 4.0 wt.% ppm wt.% Data compiled from Halleran (1988a, b, c and 1991) and Leighton (1997) Analyses in weight percent element unless indicated as ppm LREE = Light rare earth elements (La to Eu) and HREE = Heavy rare earth elements (Gd to Lu) as defined by Samson and Wood (2005) n = number of samples 19
  20. 20. Figure 1. Terranes and assemblages that comprise the western Cordillera of British Columbia and the Yukon with location ofthe Mount Bisson rare-earth element property. Map source: Geological Survey of Canadahttp://gsc.nran.gc.ca/cordgeo/terrane_e.php 20
  21. 21. Figure 2. General geology of the Wolverine rare-earth-type pegmatite field that depict locations of various mineraloccurrences described in this report. The bold red line represents the outline of the Mount Bisson claim-block. Details of theindividual claims that comprise this block can be found in Figure 3b. Geology compiled and slightly modified after Ferri andMelville (1994) and Halleran (1991).9.2 Property geologyThe property and adjacent area comprise a diversity of rock-types that were examined during the fieldinvestigations between October 2 and 5, 2007, July 17 and 23, 2008 and July 2 to 15, 2010, alongaccessible roads and helicopter drop-offs. The lithologies encountered include the Wolverine gneissesand later intrusive rocks. Three of the historical rare-earth element occurrences (Ursa, Laura #1 and #2)were examined coupled with discoveries of a rare-earth element-mineralized pegmatite system atlocality 07-FWB-08 along the M-12000 Road (see M-12000 Road occurrence) by the author and at theCentral occurrence in 2010 by T. Barresi. The M12000 Road occurrence, discovered in 2007 by theauthor, originally was situated on claim 568837 of Paget Minerals Corporation within a contiguous 22claim block at Mount Bisson but was dropped by the vendor prior to the Seymour Ventures transaction.This occurrence now lies on claim 842836 (claim name CLONE 4) that is 456.87 hectares in area andbelongs to A.R. Schindel as determined by a title search at:https://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca/mtov/searchTenures.doThe author cautions that the rare-earth element mineralization at this occurrence is not necessarilyindicative of that found on the adjacent Mount Bisson claim-group. The author also cautions that theCentral Occurrence was not examined by a qualified person in 2010 in regards to Section 6.2 (2) of NI43-101. Under this section, the property is classified as an “early stage exploration property”. Seasonal 21
  22. 22. weather conditions (snow cover) prevented the author from accessing the property and obtainingsurface samples at the time of the request from the issuer and therefore the issuer will request that asite examination be undertaken by the author in the 2011 field season.Location data for all sample sites are provided using Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) co-ordinates for Zone 10 in North American Datum 1983 (NAD83) that utilized a Garmin 76 GPS unit. Atabulation of all localities in which samples were sent to commercial laboratories for bulk analysis orfor electron microprobe analysis at The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, is given inAppendices 2 and 4 and. The locations of all samples are also shown in Figures 3a, 3b, 10, and 15.The bulk rock chemical data was processed with the Geochemical Data Toolkit (GCD kit) that ispetrogenetic software freely available at http://www.gla.ac.uk/gcdkit/ (Janousek, Farrow and Erban2006). The chemical variation of the rare-earth elements was mainly assessed with chondrite-normalized plots calculated by the reference standard of Boynton (1984). The chondrite-normalizedratios La/YbN and Eu/Eu* are respectively employed to reveal the degree of the rare-earth elementfractionation and the extent of repletion/depletion of europium.The ensuing text will now provide detailed field, petrographic and mineralogical features of alllithological groups encountered. Fourteen thin-sections from zones of rare-earth elementmineralization were selected for Cameca SX-100 electron microprobe analysis and generation of X-Ray maps. These data comprise 1179 mineral compositions that are given in Appendices 3, 5 and 6along with analytical conditions and standards used for the probe work and details of the X-Ray mapprocedure. The probe work was designed as a pilot project at the Department of Earth Sciences of TheOpen University to determine if such data could facilitate exploration of rare-earth elements in thestudy area.Figure 3a. Locations of 2007 sample sites within and proximal to the Mount Bisson claim-group. Present outline of theclaim-group is shown in red. Triangles give locations of all known rare-earth element occurrences. The locations of samplescollected in 2008 are given Figures 10 and 15. 22
  23. 23. Figure 3b. Locations of 2010 sample sites and known rare-earth element mineral occurrences within and adjacent to theMount Bisson claim-group. This map also includes location of the Manson River East Cu-W-Ag occurrence that lies adjacentto the claim-block. 23
  24. 24. 9.2.1 Wolverine Metasedimentary GneissesThis group comprise the most abundant rock types in the area investigated and are exposed at 80percent of the localities in Figure 3. The most common lithologies comprise:  clastic metasedimentary rocks (quartz arenite, wacke and metapelite),  calcium-rich metasedimentary rocks (marble, calc-silicate rocks and calcareous metapelites and wackes), and,  diorite and quartz diorite gneiss.Thin layers of amphibolite of unknown derivation are interlayered with calc-silicate rocks such asat the Ursa rare-earth element occurrence.9.2.1.1 Metawacke, Metapelite and Related MigmatitesExcellent exposures of clastic metasedimentary rocks occur at locality 07-FWB-06 where a freshlyblasted section reveals typical Wolverine metasedimentary gneiss (Photo 1).Photo 1. Good exposure of highly deformed and locally migmatized clastic metasedimentary rocks on the Munro CampRoad. Arrow on the right side indicates a dyke of peraluminous, S-type pegmatitic granite that is discordant to host-rockfoliation and yet has been subjected to ductile deformation along its contact.The outcrop consists of strongly foliated and lineated biotite and garnet-biotite metawacke and biotite-sillimanite metapelite that locally reveal low leucosome-fraction partial melt features. Here, metatexitecontains thin, deformed leucosomes oriented concordant and at low angles to the dominant foliation ofthe mesosome host. Similarly, partially melted, sillimanite-bearing metawacke and metapelite wereencountered at 07-FWB-08 on the M-12000 Road and a high degree of flattening of leucosomes isnotable in the sillimanite-rich metapelite host-rocks such that the granite leucosome and mesosome 24
  25. 25. constituents of the migmatite become blurred and may only be clearly distinguished on rock slabsetched with hydrofluoric acid and stained for K-feldspar.The clastic metasedimentary constituent contains white weathering granitic pegmatite masses that aregenerally subconcordant or modestly discordant to the host rock foliation but yet reveal evidence ofoverprinting deformation along the pegmatite contacts or by foliations that refract across such bodies(Photo 1). These rocks are described in more detail below (see Peraluminous, S-Type graniticpegmatites). Figure 4. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for various clastic metasedimentary rocks from the Wolverine gneisses.Clastic metasedimentary rocks of the area reveal chondrite patterns that are mostly confined to a bandwith total rare-earth elements in the range 162 to 199 ppm (Figure 4). These modestly negativelysloping patterns (12.7<La/YbN<28.1) compare closely with the average post-Archean Australian shalecomposite (PAAS) of Taylor and McLennan (1985) that is a good estimate of the average uppercontinental crust composition.Only one sample (148674: sillimanite-biotite metapelite) at locality 07-FWB-16 contains anomalousrare-earth element concentrations (756 ppm) that depart from the otherwise tight compositional clusterof the other clastic metasedimentary rocks. The mineral repositories of the rare-earth elements are notknown but these could include monazite. 25
  26. 26. 9.2.1.2 Quartz Arenite and Quartz-rich MetawackeThese rock types, described by Ferri and Melville (1988, 1994), are abundant to the west of themarble-calc-silicate rock band in Figure 2 but were only observed at locality 07-FWB-15. Here, layers,5 to 30 cm thick, are tectonically layered with garnet-biotite metawacke and sillimanite-biotitemetapelite (Photo 2).Photo 2. Highly tectonized layers of buff coloured quartz arenite (towards left side of photo) within a dominant, dark brownsillimanite-biotite metapelite at locality 07-FWB-15.9.2.1.3 Calcium-rich Clastic Metasedimentary RocksRocks that comprise this unit were only found at locality 07-FWB-17 where a garnet-quartz-hedenbergite-plagioclase rock, interpreted as a calcium-rich metawacke, is layered with potassicfeldspar-rich bands that conceivably represent meta-arkose. Minor amounts of fluorapatite, titanite andallanite were also confirmed in thin section and by electron microprobe analysis.Late fracture-controlled alteration, locally with quartz-rich lenticles, transects the foliation at thislocality and indicates that breakdown of K-feldspar and hedenbergite occurred in these domains. Suchbands post-date formation of the allanite as micro-fractures related to this deformation event slicethrough some grains of this mineral.9.2.1.4 Calc-Silicate Rocks and MarbleThese rocks are mainly confined to a southeast-striking band, up to 200 metres wide, that wasdelineated by Ferri and Melville (1988). This unit is traceable for at least 10 km from the ChamberlandCreek pluton on the north to beyond the southeastern limits of their map-area. Elsewhere, calc-silicaterocks and calcite marble were encountered as small outcrops (e.g., locality 07-FWB-01) or as layers up 26
  27. 27. to 3 metres in thickness within a dominant clastic metasedimentary host as at localities 07-FWB-04 and-17. The mineralogy consists of calcite, plagioclase, diopside, phlogopite, and minor garnet, epidote,and pyrite. Diopside is a characteristic mineral and can compose up to 60 percent of the mode.The Ursa rare-earth element pegmatite is situated within the mid-part of the calc-silicate band atMunro Creek where a diopside-biotite-calcite-plagioclase unit is dominant and locally layered withthin amphibolite. Diopside-rich skarn envelopes are conspicuous at this locality adjacent to a graniticpegmatite that has subjected to severe ductile deformation and late discordant biotite- and hornblende-bearing, medium-grained granite dykes.9.2.1.5 Migmatized Tonalite and Quartz DioriteRocks of this map unit consist of tonalite and quartz diorite that have been subjected to high strain andintense migmatization. These rocks occur at localities 07-FWB-13, -14 and -18 and proximal to theLaura occurrence where these are widely distributed. Near the Munro Creek at locality 07-FWB-13, a0.6 by 0.8 km mass was included in the “Mount Bisson intrusions” by Halleran and Russell (1990, p.298).These migmatites are characterized by compositional layering marked by light pink, coarse-grained topegmatitic, granite and syenite leucosomes, 1 to 5 cm in thickness, that have been severely flattenedsuch that rootless, intrafolial, isoclinal folds and shear bands are commonly evident. Some areas of thequartz diorite mesosome have undergone hornblende porphyroblastesis that imparts a coarsening tothe host of the leucosome layers (Photo 3).There is no absolute age determination for these complex rocks, however, given the high state ofdeformation and migmatization, such material could represent slivers of granitic basement to theWolverine metasedimentary gneisses that were thrust into the metamorphic complex. However, nocontact relations with the enclosing Wolverine metasedimentary rocks were observed. The migmatizedquartz diorite to tonalite rocks are intruded by white, relatively massive, biotite-bearing, graniticpegmatitic leucogranite of probable S-type, peraluminous derivation, as at locality 07-FWB-14, whereenclaves of the migmatized quartz diorite were noted. 27
  28. 28. Photo 3. Highly strained, migmatitic quartz diorite to tonalite with granite leucosomes in which severely flattened, isoclinalfolds are barely discernible (as left of pencil).9.2.2 Felsic to Intermediate Intrusive RocksLithologies of this category are abundantly distributed in the area and comprise two groups.9.2.2.1 Peraluminous, S-type Granitic PegmatitesGranitic pegmatites of this category consist of pegmatitic leucogranite and potassic pegmatite in thepegmatitic granite classification of Černý and Meintzer (1988). The presence of strongly peraluminousaccessory mineralogy such as andalusite, sillimanite, garnet and tourmaline, as exemplified by locality07-FWB-06, in the context of a high grade clastic metasedimentary setting, supports a S-type origin forthese granitoid rocks. Similar granitic pegmatites are widespread in high grade, clasticmetasedimentary-dominant subprovinces in the Superior Province of Ontario as observed anddelineated by the author (Breaks 1991; Breaks and Moore 1992; Breaks, Selway and Tindle 2005 and2006).These pegmatites are modestly to intensely deformed (Photo 1) and marked by a cataclastic,protomylonite texture and a quartz mineral stretching lineation. These pegmatite masses may have beenemplaced during several anatectic events prior to a final overprint of ductile deformation.At the Ursa rare-earth element occurrence, an internally zoned potassic pegmatite is poorly exposed(henceforth named the “Ursa pegmatite”) but appears to be concordant to the foliation of host rocks thatconsist of calc-silicate metasedimentary rocks layered with amphibolite, as surmised from very limitedrock exposure. 28
  29. 29. Figure 5. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for peraluminous, S-type granitic pegmatites of the Mount Bisson area.These rocks are severely depleted in rare-earth elements with the range of total rare-earth elements of37.6 to 54.3 ppm (Figure 5). Such values are approximately 0.3 to 0.5 times the upper continentalcrustal average (140 ppm: Taylor and McLennan 1985). A similar degree of rare-earth elementdepletion is typical of Archean S-type pegmatitic granites of the Quetico subprovince of Ontario(Breaks, Selway and Tindle 2008).The rare-earth element chondrite patterns are typically flat to modestly negatively sloping(3.5<La/YbN<29.3) and are characteristically marked by positive europium anomalies(1.08<Eu/Eu*<2.76) due to retention of Eu2+ by feldspar-rich rocks such as these.Rocks of this category are generally not good candidates for achieving economic concentrations of therare-earth elements because of their very low calcium content.9.2.2.2 Wolverine Range Intrusive SuiteThis lithologic group is dominated in the immediate area by the 78.2 ±2 Ma Chamberland Creek pluton(Figure 2). Related dykes and were encountered at several localities in the area as proximal to thesoutheastern flanks of the pluton as along the Manson River Forestry Service Road (e.g., locality 07-FWB-02). Here, white weathered, massive, predominantly medium-grained, biotite granite is exposed.Sporadic garnet and K-feldspar megacrysts up to 1 cm diameter occur in the granite that is latertransected by fracture-controlled chlorite and hematite alteration. Halos of retrograde alteration, markedby chlorite replacement of biotite, are evident up to 1 cm from these fractures.Two identical masses, respectively 0.3 by 1.5 and 0.3 by 0.6 km in surface dimensions, wereencountered proximal to the Laura rare-earth element occurrence and comprise part of this intrusive 29
  30. 30. suite (Figure 2).Similar dykes of biotite granite, which intrude the Wolverine gneisses, were found atlocalities 07-FWB-03, -05 and -16, and 08-FWB-07.At the Ursa rare-earth element occurrence, post-tectonic, planar dykes of biotite granite sharply intrudeits calc-silicate host-rocks where 5 to 10 cm thick skarn rinds are obvious and dominated by coarse-grained, bright green diopside (60-70 %).9.2.3 Mafic to Intermediate Intrusive RocksRocks of this unit are relatively minor in abundance and mostly confined to the M-12000 Road intrusivecomplex that includes the area around the Will #1 occurrence.9.2.3.1 M12000 Road Intrusive ComplexRocks of this mass, which was not comprehensively delineated by this work, occur along the M-12000Road at localities 07-FWB-08, -10, -11 and -12 (Figure 3b) and proximal to the Will # 2 occurrence atlocalities 08-FWB-02 and -06 (Figure 14). This intrusive complex is at least 3 by 5 km and consists ofbiotite-diopside-hornblende diorite, quartz diorite and sparse quartz monzonite that contain sparse maficto ultramafic plutonic enclaves.Small amounts of allanite, titanite, diopside, epidote, rutile, magnetite, ilmenite, zircon and pyrite wereobserved in thin section and confirmed by electron microprobe work in the majority of rock types ofthis complex (see M-12000 Road rare-earth element occurrence in Section 17.2).Isolated exposures of massive, white weathering, biotite granite at localities 07-FWB-09, 07-FWB-12and 08-FWB-07 are petrographically identical to the Chamberland Creek pluton and represent dykes orsmall stocks that cut the M-12000 Road intrusive complex.The chondrite REE patterns (Figure 6) are generally modestly sloping (7.2<La/YbN<29) and usuallywith small positive europium anomalies (0.98<Eu/Eu*<1.6). Sporadic K2O-rich ultramafic enclaves,mineralized with chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and scheelite, have a higher content of total rare-earthelements (240 ppm) than a sample of a similar rock selected a small distance from the mineralized zone(72 ppm). The highest total rare-earth element value occurs in a biotite-clinopyroxene-hornblendediorite (528 ppm) and is petrographically similar to titanite-diopside-hornblende diorite at the M-12000Road rare-earth element occurrence. 30
  31. 31. Figure 6. Chondrite-normalized REE plot for various units of the M-12000 Road intrusive complex.9.2.3.2 Lamprophyre DykesA one-metre thick, fine-grained, undeformed, pyrite-hornblende-biotite lamprophyre dyke cuts acrosscalc-silicate and metawacke units at locality 07-FWB-04. The rock has a panidiomorphic granulartexture marked by 20% randomly oriented biotite laths that are enveloped by plagioclase and rare quartzphenocrysts up to 2 mm diameter. Accessories include epidote, allanite, apatite and titanite.The bulk rock chemistry suggests a lamprophyric affinity with the elevated K2O, Ba, Sr and total rare-earth elements and modest fractionation of the LREE (Appendix 2). The chondrite rare-earth elementplot, with gently sloping negative curves (La/YbN = 24.4 to 30.2) bear a similarity to lamprophyres thatoccur elsewhere, as for example, the Cretaceous camptonites of northwestern Namibia (Roex andLanyon 1998).10. DEPOSIT TYPESThe rare-earth mineralized granitic pegmatites of the Wolverine field belong to the NYF geochemicalfamily (Nb-Y-F) and were classified by Černý (2005) and Ercit (2005) as Abyssal class, AB-LREE-subclass.This deposit type is currently the sole target of the proposed exploration program.The granite-related, rare-earth element mineralization in the Wolverine pegmatite field occurs in threedistinct geological settings and hence no singular exploration model is applicable:  post-tectonic, quartz-rich, calc-alkaline pegmatite vein system hosted in diorite and quartz diorite (M-12000 Road occurrence), 31
  32. 32.  S-type, peraluminous granite and pegmatite hosted in calc-silicate units of Wolverine gneiss (Ursa occurrence), and,  contact skarn mineralization layered with I-type, syenite, syenogranite, and trondhjemite of the 72.6±0.2 Ma Wolverine Range intrusive suite (Laura # 1, #2 and Pegmatite 541 occurrences and possibly the Central occurrence).Future exploration should focus upon the particular rare-earth element-lithologic association andinferred genetic history as summarized below:Ursa Rare-Earth Mineralization TypeAt the Ursa occurrence, relatively early, ductily deformed, weakly peraluminous to metaluminousgranitic pegmatites of plausible S-type origin contain local concentrations of allanite in border zonesthat contact calc-silicate and marble host-rocks. Skarn selvedges of contact metamorphic origin arecharacteristic of the pegmatites of this group and typically are diopside-rich with sparse garnet, epidote,and scheelite.Exploration for this type of rare-earth element mineralization should focus upon delineation ofperaluminous pegmatitic granite intrusions that have elevated calcium contents and characterized bydiopside, titanite, epidote and allanite due to interaction with calc-silicate host-rocks.Laura Rare-Earth Mineralization TypeThe second type of rare-earth element mineralization is exemplified by the Laura and Pegmatite 541occurrences that are inferred to be genetically related to the 72.6±0.2 Ma Wolverine Range intrusivesuite. Here, masses of allanite-titanite-plagioclase-diopside skarn are interlayered with allanite-diopsidesodic pegmatite, and medium-grained, quartz-bearing syenite, syenodiorite, monzogranite andtrondhjemite along the contact zone with the Wolverine gneiss. Such metaluminous to weaklyperaluminous rocks have similarities to volcanic arc granitic rocks in terms of trace elementclassification schemes that involve high field strength elements (HFSE) such as Ta, Nb, and Y (Pearce,Harris and Tindle 1984). The Central Occurrence is currently of undetermined genetic affiliation butmay be related to the Laura occurrence situated 3.6 km to the SE. Further field examination is requiredto define whether a genetic relationship exists between the Laura and Central occurrences.Skarn mineralization that contains allanite appears widespread on global basis as inferred from aninternet search of relevant publications. In contrast, allanite is relatively sparse in carbonatite intrusions,silica-undersatured alkaline intrusive rocks (Plimer 1993) and quartz-bearing granitic rocks enriched inalkali metals (e.g., Rodeo de los Molles REE-Th deposit, Argentina: Lira and Ripley 1991).The Mary-Kathleen U-REE deposit in Australia exemplifies an association of allanite with a diopside-rich, calcic skarn spatially associated with the endoskarns related to the 1.7Ga Burstall granite (Page1982; Oliver 1995; Australian Geoscience: http:// www.ga.gov.au/image_cache/GA3785.pdf ). Theformation of this deposit, however, is interpreted as a later event related to regional metamorphism,ductile shearing and hydrothermal mobilization (Maas et al. 1987).During 1958 to 1982, 9.5 million tonnes of ore that averaged 0.13 wt.% U3O8 were mined and thisdevelopment included 200, 000 tonnes of allanite-rich ore with an average grade of 2.6 wt.% totalREE (Plimer 1993). The author, however, is unable to verify the information in relation to the tonnageand average grade of the Mary-Kathleen U-REE deposit and therefore these data are not necessarilyindicative of mineralization on the Mount Bisson claim-group that is the subject of this technical report. 32
  33. 33. Mineralization of a possibly similar style occurs at Hoidas Lake in the Rae Province in northernSaskatchewan, where rare-earth elements, present in allanite and apatite, are associated with a diopside-rich skarn contained within a shear zone called the Hoida-Nisikkatch fault (Gunning and Card 2005).Rare-earth element mineralization of probable skarn affiliation and associated with calc-silicate,paragneiss and mafic metavolcanic rocks are also known in northern Quebec where veins enriched inallanite occur at the Lataille showing. Samples of Madore et al. (2002) and Labbe et al. (2003) returnedan average of 0.25 wt % total REE and with a maximum content of 1.59 wt.%.Halleran (1991) interpreted the metasomatism and origin of the rare-earth element mineralization at theLaura occurrence as due to alkalic intrusive activity and related fenitization. However, data in presentwork (electron microprobe analysis and lithochemistry) have thus far indicated a complete absence ofminerals and rock types that substantiate the presence of fenitization such as aegerine-augite,arfvedsonite group, and riebeckite group. Fenitization is commonly linked to undersaturated, alkalineintrusive rocks such as nepheline syenite, ijolite and urtite or to carbonatite masses (Bell 1989) andthese two lithologic groups were not observed on the property.Evidence of metasomatism and rare-earth element enrichment due to interaction with pegmatite-forming fluids was, however, noted along the contact of Pegmatite 541 near the Laura occurrence wherediorite of the Wolverine gneiss host-rocks contains a notable increase in diopside, titanite and allanite atthe partial expense of hornblende.Exploration should closely examine the contact zones between plutons of the Wolverine Rangeintrusive suite and the Wolverine metasedimentary gneisses, particularly where interleaved calc-silicateunits are involved that could generate skarn mineralization through magmatic interaction.M-12000 Road Rare-Earth Mineralization TypeThe M-12000 Road occurrence constitutes the third rare-earth element mineralization type documentedin this work. This occurrence was originally situated on claim 568837 of Paget Minerals Corporationwithin a contiguous 22 claim block at Mount Bisson but was dropped by the vendor prior to theSeymour Ventures transaction. This occurrence now lies on claim 842836 (claim name CLONE 4) thatis 456.87 hectares in area and belongs to A.R. Schindel as determined by a title search at:https://www.mtonline.gov.bc.ca/mtov/searchTenures.doThe author cautions that the rare-earth element mineralization at this occurrence is not necessarilyindicative of that found on the adjacent Mount Bisson claim-group.The showing consists of vein systems of undeformed, quartz-rich, titanite-diopside calc-alkalinepegmatite (2-3 m width and exposed over 5 m minimum strike length) hosted within lineated, titanite-hornblende diorite and quartz diorite. The mafic rocks, in turn, are contained within migmatized andhighly deformed clastic metasedimentary rocks. A distinctive green metasomatic aureole issymmetrically deposed along the vein margins and comprises titanite-diopside enrichment inhornblende quartz diorite that is evident along the flanks of the pegmatite veins.Elevated total REE contents up to 1463 ppm, with the highest yttrium (124 ppm) and total HREE values(123 ppm), were found in grab samples from the occurrence. Epidote, titanite and vesuvianite revealenrichment in Y2O3 up to 3.5 wt.%. The close geochemical similarity of yttrium with some of theHREE’s such as holmium and gadolinium (Samson and Wood 2005) suggests that exploration potentialexists in the immediate area of this occurrence for such elements 33

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