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Creating a Talent Development Culture: <br />How Managers Can Make Training Stick and Boost Performance<br />1<br />
2<br />Stephen Meyer<br />CEO and Director of Learning and Development at Rapid Learning Institute<br />SMeyer@rapidlearni...
3<br />Why it all stays in Vegas<br />
Sure you got some value<br />But why is knowledge retention so poor?<br />And what’s the cost?<br />4<br />No big deal?<br />
The science behind forgetting<br />Why the problem goes way beyond that conference in Vegas<br />What if all the training ...
Your training isn’t achieving ROI<br />There’s another way that changes everything<br />6<br />Re-framing training<br />
This approach addresses the one killer factor in the talent development dilemma:<br />Managers are accountable for trainin...
Training fails because managers fail to: <br />Assess needs<br />Build curricula<br />Deliver curricula<br />Follow up<br ...
Great leaders? No<br />Great trainers? No<br />Either seniority or technical skill<br />Company placed a bet<br />“You’ll ...
Great leaders have two qualities:<br />Strong technical skills<br />The ability to develop people<br />But new managers qu...
Managers know talent development is crucial<br />But urgent matters take precedence<br />Training either: <br />Doesn’t ge...
The Four Levels <br />Reaction<br />Learning<br />Behaviors<br />Results<br />12<br />Kirkpatrick on ‘Training Evaluation’...
How often do organizations actually use the four levels:<br />Reaction – 96%<br />Learning – 37%<br />Behaviors – 13%<br /...
We don’t know whether we’re getting an ROI<br />Why training so often fails<br />14<br />What the survey tells us<br />
How often do organizations actually use the four levels:<br />Reaction – 96%<br />Learning – 37%<br />Behaviors – 13%<br /...
It’s that training is just an event<br />“I sent Jane to training, so I’ll automatically get some benefit”<br />That makes...
Training is a PROCESS, not an event!<br />That’s why the ASTD survey is so troubling<br />Without follow-up, training even...
18<br />Killer Sales Trainer<br />
I asked the sales manager, “How will you make it stick?”<br />His voice said: “I’ll follow up”<br />His body language said...
20<br />Killer Sales Trainer<br />
21<br />
Have you heard of the “learning curve?”<br />Term coined by HermannEbbinghaus in 1880s<br />He coined a less well-known te...
23<br />The Ebbinghaus ‘Forgetting Curve’<br />Retention (percent)<br />immediate recall<br />20 minutes<br />1 hour<br />...
24<br />Follow up is the key<br />
25<br />Time spent in each Phase<br />Follow Up:<br />5%<br /><ul><li>Preparation
The event itself
Follow up</li></ul>Planning:<br />10%<br />Training <br />Event:<br />85%<br />Source: “The Promise of Phase 3, TD Magazin...
Follow up ain’thappenin’<br />Everyone believes the ROI is automatic<br />Companies are losing lots of money<br />26<br />...
27<br />Follow up<br />Highest skill level<br />Permanent mastery of skills<br />Skill improves<br />Skill improves<br />F...
Bersin & Associates study: Which of 22 management processes has highest impact?<br />Answer: Performance coaching<br />Coa...
The most-cited study on the value of post-training follow-up<br />31 people got management training<br />Result: 22% incre...
30<br />It’s all about follow up<br />If follow up works so well, why isn’t anybody doing it?<br />If we’re uncomfortable ...
Isolating a learning concept<br />31<br />The answer: Chunking <br />
Short examples<br />“Nail the first 20 seconds of a cold call”<br />“How to terminate an insubordinate employee”<br />“How...
33<br />Why employees benefit<br />Adult learners are different<br />They quickly succumb to “cognitive overload”<br />
J<br />34<br />Exercise<br />FKFB<br />INAT<br />OUP<br />SNA<br />SAI<br />RS<br />
JFK  FBI  NATO  UPS  NASA  IRS<br />35<br />Exercise<br />
Chunking delivers:<br />Higher engagement<br />Higher knowledge retention<br />Killer Sales Trainer did too much:<br />Cre...
The brain isn’t immutable<br />It changes based on what we do<br />Lately, we’ve been doing a lot of Googling<br />37<br /...
38<br />Digital natives<br />
39<br />Boomers and GenXers<br />
“The homily in general should not go over eight, minutes – the average amount of time for a listener to concentrate.” <br ...
Remember: Most managers lack the “Second Core Competency”<br />Chunking helps them “reframe” their talent development role...
Most manager view TD through a wide lens<br />I need to teach sales reps “to sell”<br />I need to teach managers “to manag...
I’ll teach my sales reps to make cold calls<br />I’ll teach my managers how to delegate<br />The narrow lens makestraining...
Common sales challenge is price objections: <br />“I don’t have the budget for that”<br />“My boss will blow a gasket”<br ...
What sales manager Connie does:<br />Kicks off meeting with “chunked” module<br />45 minutes of discussion and role play<b...
She got good REACTION – “Connie, that session was great”<br />She got evidence of LEARNING – “I’d never looked at price ob...
47<br />A Small Victory<br />
Spent three weeks on price objections<br />Continually reinforced the concept<br />Moved on to new topics on three-week cy...
For learners: Decreases cognitive overload<br />For managers: It’s transformational<br />Chunks of learning don’t seem ove...
50<br />Example of chunked learning<br />QUICK TAKE MODULE:<br />How To Deliver High-Impact <br />Employee Praise<br />
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Creating a Talent Development Culture: How "Chunked" Learning Can Boost Performance

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This is a slideshow version of a free webinar presented by Stephen Meyer, President of The Rapid Learning Institute. You can view the full webinar with audio here:http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/recorded-hr-webinars/creating-talent-development-culture/

Get more information and a free trial to the Rapid Learning Institute at: www.rapidlearninginstitute.com

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  • GO TO YOU HANDOUT[ASK] How do you know that training works or doesn’t work?” [USE THE FLIP CHART – WRITE DOWN THE FOUR LEVELS AS THE AUDIENCE BRINGS THEM UP]The technical term for what we just described is “training evaluation.” The model that everybody uses was created by Donald Kirkpatrick back in the 1950s. He did his Ph.D. thesis on it. It’s extremely simple, without being simplistic, and totally intuitive. When evaluating a trainingyou look at it from four levels. Let’s say you sent a salesperson named Jane to a two-day training session. You invested a lot of money in this training, so you naturally want to know whether you got a payoff. Here, according to Kirkpatrick’s model, is what you’d look at:1. Reaction: what did Jane think of the program. She loved it. She’s fired up.2. What did Jane learn – let’s say she learned a technique called High-Probability Selling method for prospecting. It taught specific behaviors for dis-qualifying non-buyers and identifying real ones.3. Behavior – you want to know if Jane is actually implementing the techniques she learned4. Results – Did her sales results improve.GO TO HANDOUT AND LOOK AT SKIM THROUGH THE RESPONSES.
  • Here’s some bad news for anybody who’s spending money on training.ASTD Benchmarking Forum survey to determine what percentage each of Kirkpatrick&apos;s four levels are used in organizations: These stats tell an awful story. The only reason to do training is to get results. But most people aren’t tracking them. The 3% and 13% numbers are shocking, but you can sort of see why they’re so low. It’s pretty hard to observe behavior changes and it’s really hard to map training directly to results. I’m most intrigued by the 37% for learning because it’s relatively simple to determine if somebody learned something at training. You could ask them, what did you learn? You could give a quiz? Have them write a one-page summary. But 60%+ of the time that’s not happening. [WHAT ASSUMPTIONS IS A MANAGER MAKING IF HE/SHE DOESN’T EVEN ASK “WHAT DID YO LEARN?”That many managers do “feel good” training. They know they’re supposed to train their people. They’ve got some budget for it. So they pay $20k or whatever and bring in an outside consultant. And they figure, “Okay, I’m done.” They believe training is an event, not a process.
  • Here’s some bad news for anybody who’s spending money on training.ASTD Benchmarking Forum survey to determine what percentage each of Kirkpatrick&apos;s four levels are used in organizations: These stats tell an awful story. The only reason to do training is to get results. But most people aren’t tracking them. The 3% and 13% numbers are shocking, but you can sort of see why they’re so low. It’s pretty hard to observe behavior changes and it’s really hard to map training directly to results. I’m most intrigued by the 37% for learning because it’s relatively simple to determine if somebody learned something at training. You could ask them, what did you learn? You could give a quiz? Have them write a one-page summary. But 60%+ of the time that’s not happening. [WHAT ASSUMPTIONS IS A MANAGER MAKING IF HE/SHE DOESN’T EVEN ASK “WHAT DID YO LEARN?”That many managers do “feel good” training. They know they’re supposed to train their people. They’ve got some budget for it. So they pay $20k or whatever and bring in an outside consultant. And they figure, “Okay, I’m done.” They believe training is an event, not a process.
  • This is kind of what he was saying about his client
  • Interesting tidbit. Even the Vatican has caught on to chunking. Isn’t the Vatican the most conservative organization on earth? The last one to embrace change?
  • Transcript of "Creating a Talent Development Culture: How "Chunked" Learning Can Boost Performance"

    1. 1. Creating a Talent Development Culture: <br />How Managers Can Make Training Stick and Boost Performance<br />1<br />
    2. 2. 2<br />Stephen Meyer<br />CEO and Director of Learning and Development at Rapid Learning Institute<br />SMeyer@rapidlearninginstitute.com<br />
    3. 3. 3<br />Why it all stays in Vegas<br />
    4. 4. Sure you got some value<br />But why is knowledge retention so poor?<br />And what’s the cost?<br />4<br />No big deal?<br />
    5. 5. The science behind forgetting<br />Why the problem goes way beyond that conference in Vegas<br />What if all the training in your organization doesn’t stick?<br />5<br />What we’ll discuss<br />
    6. 6. Your training isn’t achieving ROI<br />There’s another way that changes everything<br />6<br />Re-framing training<br />
    7. 7. This approach addresses the one killer factor in the talent development dilemma:<br />Managers are accountable for training<br />It’s not their fault<br />But we can’t run from the problem <br />7<br />The core problem<br />
    8. 8. Training fails because managers fail to: <br />Assess needs<br />Build curricula<br />Deliver curricula<br />Follow up<br />Why? Because we never trained them<br />8<br />Why training fails<br />
    9. 9. Great leaders? No<br />Great trainers? No<br />Either seniority or technical skill<br />Company placed a bet<br />“You’ll be able to get results through others”<br />9<br />Why managers get promoted<br />
    10. 10. Great leaders have two qualities:<br />Strong technical skills<br />The ability to develop people<br />But new managers quickly discover:<br />“I don’t know how to do this”<br />“Even if I can do it, I don’t have time”<br />10<br />The second core competency<br />
    11. 11. Managers know talent development is crucial<br />But urgent matters take precedence<br />Training either: <br />Doesn’t get done<br />Gets done half-heartedly<br />11<br />Bottom of the list<br />
    12. 12. The Four Levels <br />Reaction<br />Learning<br />Behaviors<br />Results<br />12<br />Kirkpatrick on ‘Training Evaluation’<br />
    13. 13. How often do organizations actually use the four levels:<br />Reaction – 96%<br />Learning – 37%<br />Behaviors – 13%<br />Results – 3%<br />Source: McMurrer et al. (2000) surveyed the ASTD Benchmarking Forum <br />13<br />ASTD Study: The bad news<br />
    14. 14. We don’t know whether we’re getting an ROI<br />Why training so often fails<br />14<br />What the survey tells us<br />
    15. 15. How often do organizations actually use the four levels:<br />Reaction – 96%<br />Learning – 37%<br />Behaviors – 13%<br />Results – 3%<br />Source: McMurrer et al. (2000) surveyed the ASTD Benchmarking Forum <br />15<br />Study: The bad news<br />
    16. 16. It’s that training is just an event<br />“I sent Jane to training, so I’ll automatically get some benefit”<br />That makes me feel good about myself<br />16<br />The deadly assumption<br />
    17. 17. Training is a PROCESS, not an event!<br />That’s why the ASTD survey is so troubling<br />Without follow-up, training events fail<br />17<br />You shouldn’t feel good<br />
    18. 18. 18<br />Killer Sales Trainer<br />
    19. 19. I asked the sales manager, “How will you make it stick?”<br />His voice said: “I’ll follow up”<br />His body language said: “I haven’t a clue”<br />19<br />An uncomfortable question<br />
    20. 20. 20<br />Killer Sales Trainer<br />
    21. 21. 21<br />
    22. 22. Have you heard of the “learning curve?”<br />Term coined by HermannEbbinghaus in 1880s<br />He coined a less well-known term …<br />22<br />Studies on knowledge retention<br />Hermann Ebbinghaus<br />1850-1909<br />
    23. 23. 23<br />The Ebbinghaus ‘Forgetting Curve’<br />Retention (percent)<br />immediate recall<br />20 minutes<br />1 hour<br />9 hours<br />20% retention<br />2<br />4<br />6<br />8<br />10<br />15<br />20<br />25<br />31<br />Elapsed Time (days)<br />Source: Hermann Ebbinghaus, Memory: A Contribution to Experimental Psychology, 1885/1913<br />
    24. 24. 24<br />Follow up is the key<br />
    25. 25. 25<br />Time spent in each Phase<br />Follow Up:<br />5%<br /><ul><li>Preparation
    26. 26. The event itself
    27. 27. Follow up</li></ul>Planning:<br />10%<br />Training <br />Event:<br />85%<br />Source: “The Promise of Phase 3, TD Magazine”, Jan. 2005<br />
    28. 28. Follow up ain’thappenin’<br />Everyone believes the ROI is automatic<br />Companies are losing lots of money<br />26<br />Wasted money and effort<br />
    29. 29. 27<br />Follow up<br />Highest skill level<br />Permanent mastery of skills<br />Skill improves<br />Skill improves<br />Follow-up occurs<br />Skill improves<br />Follow-up occurs<br />Most employees<br />Training occurs<br />Lowest skill level<br />Source: The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes<br />
    30. 30. Bersin & Associates study: Which of 22 management processes has highest impact?<br />Answer: Performance coaching<br />Coaching is follow up – revisiting fundamentals<br />28<br />Coaching study<br />
    31. 31. The most-cited study on the value of post-training follow-up<br />31 people got management training<br />Result: 22% increase in performance<br />Same group got performance coaching<br />Result: 88% increase in performance<br />Coaching increased ROI 4x<br />29<br />The Baruch study<br />
    32. 32. 30<br />It’s all about follow up<br />If follow up works so well, why isn’t anybody doing it?<br />If we’re uncomfortable doing something, we put it off<br />
    33. 33. Isolating a learning concept<br />31<br />The answer: Chunking <br />
    34. 34. Short examples<br />“Nail the first 20 seconds of a cold call”<br />“How to terminate an insubordinate employee”<br />“How to smoke out an imposter in a job interview”<br />Breaking it down<br />32<br />
    35. 35. 33<br />Why employees benefit<br />Adult learners are different<br />They quickly succumb to “cognitive overload”<br />
    36. 36. J<br />34<br />Exercise<br />FKFB<br />INAT<br />OUP<br />SNA<br />SAI<br />RS<br />
    37. 37. JFK FBI NATO UPS NASA IRS<br />35<br />Exercise<br />
    38. 38. Chunking delivers:<br />Higher engagement<br />Higher knowledge retention<br />Killer Sales Trainer did too much:<br />Created cognitive overload<br />36<br />Shut off the fire hose<br />
    39. 39. The brain isn’t immutable<br />It changes based on what we do<br />Lately, we’ve been doing a lot of Googling<br />37<br />Neuroplasticity<br />
    40. 40. 38<br />Digital natives<br />
    41. 41. 39<br />Boomers and GenXers<br />
    42. 42. “The homily in general should not go over eight, minutes – the average amount of time for a listener to concentrate.” <br />L'Osservatore Romano (Vatican newspaper) 3/10/2008<br />40<br />Vatican endorsement<br />
    43. 43. Remember: Most managers lack the “Second Core Competency”<br />Chunking helps them “reframe” their talent development role<br />41<br />Breakthrough for managers<br />
    44. 44. Most manager view TD through a wide lens<br />I need to teach sales reps “to sell”<br />I need to teach managers “to manage” <br />The result: TD seems overwhelming<br />42<br />The wide lens<br />
    45. 45. I’ll teach my sales reps to make cold calls<br />I’ll teach my managers how to delegate<br />The narrow lens makestraining seem doable<br />43<br />The narrow lens<br />
    46. 46. Common sales challenge is price objections: <br />“I don’t have the budget for that”<br />“My boss will blow a gasket”<br />Concept: buyers who say that are making THEIR problem YOUR problem<br />They’re throwing you a hot potato<br />Action step: Throw the hot potato back<br />Make THEIR problem, THEIR problem<br />44<br />Example: The hot potato<br />
    47. 47. What sales manager Connie does:<br />Kicks off meeting with “chunked” module<br />45 minutes of discussion and role play<br />Her confidence as a talent developer was low<br />But …<br />45<br />Chunked learning in action<br />
    48. 48. She got good REACTION – “Connie, that session was great”<br />She got evidence of LEARNING – “I’d never looked at price objections that way before”<br />She saw BEHAVIOR change – “Connie, I held firm on price with a prospect today”<br />She got RESULTS: “Connie, the buyer agreed my price was fair”<br />46<br />Kirkpatrick revisited<br />
    49. 49. 47<br />A Small Victory<br />
    50. 50. Spent three weeks on price objections<br />Continually reinforced the concept<br />Moved on to new topics on three-week cycles<br />In a year she achieved 17 small victories<br />She also become a very competent trainer<br />48<br />What Connie did<br />
    51. 51. For learners: Decreases cognitive overload<br />For managers: It’s transformational<br />Chunks of learning don’t seem overwhelming<br />Training gets done<br />Managers build a newcore competency<br />49<br />Game changer<br />
    52. 52. 50<br />Example of chunked learning<br />QUICK TAKE MODULE:<br />How To Deliver High-Impact <br />Employee Praise<br />
    53. 53. Key points:<br />Praise can backfire<br />Common praise missteps<br />The proper way to give praise<br />Do you feel inspired to act?<br />Give praise today<br />Example of chunked learning<br />
    54. 54. The Offer<br />For a free tour of the Compliance & Management Rapid Learning Center<br />Call 877-792-2172<br />
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