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ASP.NET MVC routing
 

ASP.NET MVC routing

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    ASP.NET MVC routing ASP.NET MVC routing Presentation Transcript

    • Routing in ASP.NET MVC Creating a RESTful interface to your site
    • Remember, browsers make HTTP requests
    • HTTP requests use a verb to communicate their intent › GET › POST › PUT › DELETE
    • Alright. Got that out of the way. Now back to our regularlyscheduled lecture. ›  asdf
    • Which is better? This … http://tic.com/Report.aspx? t=Sales&y=2013&m=07! … or this … http://tic.com/Sales/2013/7! Why?
    • Reasons ›  SEO ›  Easy to type ›  Easy to remember ›  Hides implementation stack ›  URLs don’t have to change when the site changes. ›  Hackable
    • URLs point to resources. ›  Uniform ________________ locator ›  They don’t point to pages ›  So RESTful URLs are more accurate, actually
    • HI, I'm Roy Fielding, the inventor of REST. REST is ... an architectural style … for addressing resources … in a stateless environment … that reduces coupling
    • A RESTful URL is one that conforms to all of the constraints ›  Separation between client and server ›  Stateless communication ›  Cacheable ›  A layered system ›  A uniform interface
    • A layered system has predictable parts The usual method Properly RESTful url Category Category Thing Thing Action ID ID (Use HTTP method as action)
    • Use the HTTP requests to specify the action › GET › POST › PUT › DELETE
    • The URL should act as an API › http://tic.com/Customer/List › http://tic.com/Customer/Create › http://tic.com/Customer/Details/71 › http://tic.com/Customer/Edit/71 › http://tic.com/Customer/Delete/71 › http://tic.com/Department › http://tic.com/Employee › http://tic.com/AddToCart/17
    • Or better yet ... › GET http://tic.com/Customer › POST http://tic.com/Customer › GET http://tic.com/Customer/71 › PUT http://tic.com/Customer/71 › DELETE http://tic.com/Customer/71 › GET http://tic.com/Department › GET http://tic.com/Employee › POST http://tic.com/AddToCart/17
    • There are certain things you can do to make a URL RESTful ›  Give every “thing” an ID ›  Link things together ›  Use standard methods ›  Communicate statelessly ›  Provide multiple representations
    • Resources with multiple representations › HTML › XML › VCard › RSS
    • Okay, I'm sold on RESTful urls. How do I get them into MVC?
    • Registering routes tells IIS that if a user asks for X, send them to Y
    • We use the MapRoute() method to create these routes MyRoutes.MapRoute(! string RouteName,! string UrlPattern,! object Defaults);! ›  Says when an url matching UrlPattern comes through, what do we do with it?
    • Routing in ASP.NET MVC are set in Application_Start ›  Pulled out into a static method by default. public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)! {! routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");! routes.MapRoute(! "Default", // Route name! "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parms! new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", ! id = UrlParameter.Optional } // defaults! );! }!
    • Routes are matched in order that they appear
    • Hardcoded routes are easy routes.MapRoute(! "ListAllProducts",! "Product/List",! new { ! controller="Home", ! action="ShowProducts"! }! );!
    • Hands-on literal routes
    • Can receive arguments by putting them in curly braces ›  aka. URL Parameters
    • Examples Route definition Example of matching url {controller}/{action}/{category} Product/show/beverage {table}/details.aspx Products/Details.aspx blog/{action}/{entry} blog/read/1234 blog/{entry}-{SEOString} blog/2234-Why-string-theory-isflawed {reportType}/{year}/{month}/{day} sales/2012/7/15 {locale}/{action} en-US/show
    • Hands-on matching routes
    • Optional parameters can save you from creating a lot of routes ›  Example: you want to match ›  Clients/Miller ›  Clients/Miller/Harold ›  Clients/Miller/Harold/Dr … with the same route ›  Simply make first name and title optional with: new { FirstName = UrlParameter.Optional, Title = UrlParameter.Optional }!
    • Hands-on optional parameters
    • Hands-on default values
    • Regular expression constraints routes.MapRoute(! "BlogArchive",! "Archive/{entryDate}",! new { controller="Blog", action="Archive" }, ! new { entryDate=@"d{2}-d{2}-d{4}" }! );!
    • Hands-on constraints
    • Conclusion ›  RESTful urls are easier to use, therefore better ›  MVC lends itself well to REST; in fact REST is pretty much required to get to controllers and actions ›  Routes are set up using RegisterRoutes()
    • Oh! And one more thing ... These routes work for WebForms also ›  They're exactly the same.