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Engaging Our Children  Teaching Tolerance, Empathy and Positive Choices
Kidsbridge Mission O Tolerance T Confidence and Courage Anti-Bullying Role Models and Heroes Empathy For Others One Person...
Signs of the Times <ul><li>Large graphic panels introduce visitors to exhibit subject matter, content, and the definitions...
“ Different” Abilities & Exclusion  Students learn that being a silent bystander is comparable to doing a harmful action. ...
Name That Stereotype <ul><li>Name That Stereotype  consists of kiosks designed to teach children and teens how to recogniz...
School Bus Showdown <ul><li>The  School Bus Showdown  consists of a seated interactive video station. </li></ul><ul><li>Vi...
Peace Diner & Name Shredder <ul><li>In the  Peace Diner   visitors sit and listen to an audio tape of name calling . </li>...
Puppet Theater <ul><li>Puppet shows are effective because they :  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Powerfully reinforce the tolerance...
Hero Room Brandon Keefe Created a book drive for a library with limited resources, which led to the creation of the BookEn...
Our Everyday Heroes <ul><ul><li>Began this organization when he was 9 years old </li></ul></ul>Anthony Dale Leanna Started...
Our Everyday Heroes <ul><ul><li>With Vietnam Health Education and Literature Projects, provided clothing, meals, literacy ...
Kidsbridge Runs on Volunteers  Kidsbridge collaborates with TCNJ's Children's Social Development Lab and TCNJ's education ...
2.0 Expansion Goals for 2009 <ul><li>Outdated computer lab </li></ul><ul><li>1.0 Website with no specialized sections for ...
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Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum

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Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum, located on The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) campus, features the interactive exhibit Face to Face: Dealing with Prejudice and Discrimination , focusing on diversity appreciation and character education. TCNJ students and their professors interact with approximately 2,000 elementary and middle school students, day campers, Scouts and leadership groups each year.

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Transcript of "Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum"

  1. 1. Engaging Our Children Teaching Tolerance, Empathy and Positive Choices
  2. 2. Kidsbridge Mission O Tolerance T Confidence and Courage Anti-Bullying Role Models and Heroes Empathy For Others One Person Can Make a Difference Learning Social skills Negotiation Skills Engagement with Adults Kidsbridge Tolerance Museum is a nonprofit organization dedicated to character education, tolerance and the celebration of human diversity. Kidsbridge, located on The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) campus, features the interactive exhibit F a ce to Face: Dealing with Prejudice and Discrimination , focusing on diversity appreciation and character education. TCNJ students and their professors interact with approximately 2,000 elementary and middle school students, day campers, Scouts and leadership groups each year. L E R A N C E
  3. 3. Signs of the Times <ul><li>Large graphic panels introduce visitors to exhibit subject matter, content, and the definitions of prejudice and discrimination. </li></ul><ul><li>Seated computer/video stations feature real children’s stories, allowing the visitor to explore how these kids responded to these experiences and their feelings about the situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Certain exhibit areas include strong language and experiences, so teachers and students explore the exhibit together. </li></ul>Goal is to inspire and empower youth to take action against prejudice and discrimination in their own lives. Students Large put prejudice and discrimination into context by discussing historical signage and photographs. The “Face to Face” exhibition is an interactive mini-lab designed to introduce children and teens to the many differences among us all. Differences covered are physical abilities, as well as religious, cultural, racial and social backgrounds. Museum experience is designed to help visitors recognize discrimination and stereotyping that may result from these differences.
  4. 4. “ Different” Abilities & Exclusion Students learn that being a silent bystander is comparable to doing a harmful action. Exclusion because of differences in abilities is a form of prejudice and discrimination. TCNJ student John, with his seeing-eye dog Marco, talks with students about what it is like to be a college student and unable to see.
  5. 5. Name That Stereotype <ul><li>Name That Stereotype consists of kiosks designed to teach children and teens how to recognize and dispel stereotypes. </li></ul><ul><li>The message conveyed is that stereotypes (whether they are blatant or subtle) are always negative, and that people should not judge others by how they look or the group to which they belong. </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn that both adults and kids use stereotypes, and that the media - in particular TV - uses stereotypes heavily in game shows, sit com laugh tracks and commercials. </li></ul>Students learn to recognize the verbal and visual cues of stereotyping in adult conversation and on TV. Video interactive game show led by lively host. The child pushes a button each time he or she hears a stereotype, and the host responds.
  6. 6. School Bus Showdown <ul><li>The School Bus Showdown consists of a seated interactive video station. </li></ul><ul><li>Video features a school bus scene in which a child is being heckled while looking for a seat and no one is letting him sit down. Six kids have room in their seats for him - three scoot over and three do not. </li></ul><ul><li>The visitor then chooses from a series of r e wind b u ttons to explore the reason each child had for letting or not letting the excluded child sit down. </li></ul><ul><li>The kids’ thoughts reveal conflicting emotions about the decisions they made. </li></ul><ul><li>Two kid hosts will discuss the conflicting issues, reiterating that it is hard to go against the group and you ’v e got to be brave, but sometimes it ’s i mportant to do the right thing. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Peace Diner & Name Shredder <ul><li>In the Peace Diner visitors sit and listen to an audio tape of name calling . </li></ul><ul><li>An instructional video advises visitors to participate in a role playing exercise using a variety of tools and strategies for dealing with name calling. </li></ul><ul><li>These strategies are written on cut-outs shaped as shields. </li></ul><ul><li>Children choose the shields with which they are most comfortable and place these on a “power pack” in front of them. </li></ul><ul><li>They then role play these responses with an adult. </li></ul>The second activity in the Peace Diner is the Name Shredder where visitors can write a hurtful name down on a slip of paper and then feed it into a paper shredder and watch it be destroyed. Name calling is a form of prejudice and discrimination. Students explore their emotions about victims of name calling (and how to handle it).
  8. 8. Puppet Theater <ul><li>Puppet shows are effective because they : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Powerfully reinforce the tolerance and character education messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are a proven educational medium for enhancing students’ language development especially in the areas of oral communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhance affective growth through promoting self-confidence, social skills, and increased empathy. </li></ul></ul>Educational drama also provides insights for teachers who are watching with the students . Creating a puppet - then writing & performing skits - helps kids to affirm the museum lessons they have learned.
  9. 9. Hero Room Brandon Keefe Created a book drive for a library with limited resources, which led to the creation of the BookEnds organization. <ul><ul><li>7 years later: there were 60,000 volunteers who collected about 150,000 volumes, completed 46 libraries, with another 32 in the process of development. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the Hero Room visitors are introduced to famous heroes like Martin Luther King Jr. </li></ul><ul><li>Heroes are differentiated from other famous people like celebrities (many children view celebrities as heroes). </li></ul><ul><li>Less famous heroes, old and young, are introduced with the use of wall exhibits and books. </li></ul><ul><li>Each child is asked to pick one of these heroes and verbalize what about them makes them a hero. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Our Everyday Heroes <ul><ul><li>Began this organization when he was 9 years old </li></ul></ul>Anthony Dale Leanna Started Heavenly Hats, an organization that donates new hats to cancer patients Tori Degen Survivor of two bouts with cancer. Now lead ambassador for Make a Wish Foundation <ul><ul><li>Committed herself to sharing her story with others and volunteering </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Our Everyday Heroes <ul><ul><li>With Vietnam Health Education and Literature Projects, provided clothing, meals, literacy classes, and basic medical needs to more than 100 orphans </li></ul></ul>Chi Nguyen Raised over $31,000 to help Vietnamese street children by holding benefit concerts and selling homemade almond toffee Ryan Hreljac At age 6 he became concerned about people who got sick because they did not have access to clean water <ul><ul><li>Did chores around the house and organized fundraisers - saving enough money ($2,000) to build a well </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Kidsbridge Runs on Volunteers Kidsbridge collaborates with TCNJ's Children's Social Development Lab and TCNJ's education and psychology departments. Over 100 college students have participated as docents. Kidsbridge is always looking for additional volunteers to serve as docents.
  13. 13. 2.0 Expansion Goals for 2009 <ul><li>Outdated computer lab </li></ul><ul><li>1.0 Website with no specialized sections for student, teachers, parents and volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Museum experience between students and teachers limited to one-time physical event </li></ul><ul><li>No assessment capabilities beyond observation and notes taken by TCNJ psychology students </li></ul><ul><li>Update computer lab equipment & technology </li></ul><ul><li>Unify experiences in physical space with a robust online user experience (website, blogs) </li></ul><ul><li>Allow the experience to continue beyond the walls of the museum </li></ul><ul><li>Record usage data for regular and detailed assessment </li></ul>Current Status Desired Status
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