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Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
Instructional Multimedia Development
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Instructional Multimedia Development

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  • The term "multimedia" has taken on many meanings. Defined for this Presentation
  • Integration of different media multiplies the impact of a message. The focus is on instruction and learning. According to the research reports by Mayer and McCarthy and Walton, multimedia has gained acceptance with many benefits derived from its use. Learning gains are 56% greater, consistency of learning is 50-60% better and content retention is 25-50% higher.
  • Instructional multimedia focuses on what the learner is expected to do upon the completion of the instruction. Computer technology can assist the instructional environment in one of three basic categories
  • electronic communication, presentation support, or student materials.
  • These give teachers and students more opportunities to talk to each other by leaving messages. This can have the effect of extending mutually-convenient office hours. Students can leave notes for the teacher, and the teacher can post assignments, answer questions, and engage in discussions.
  • using the computer to enhance a lecture. This is the digital version of slides or overheads. The advantage of a multimedia presentation is that you can set your slides to show a movie clip or pictures. You can play them sequentially or pick slides at random as you speak.
  • programs used by students either alone or in class. Design a module to address many different instructional goals such as giving information, providing simulated experiences, or giving drill-and-practice opportunities. Developing multimedia is an interdisciplinary task. The process of instructional design is defining where you want to go instructionally, and developing a "map" of information and experiences to guide your students to the same destination or goal.
  • Use multimedia whenever, in your best judgment, it can facilitate learning or increase understanding of your material. Communicating to facilitate learning can be a challenging process, often requiring creative efforts to achieve a variety of implicit instructional goals.
  • The Cone was originally developed by Edgar Dale in 1946 and was intended as a way to describe various learning experiences.
  • The Cone was originally developed by Edgar Dale in 1946 and was intended as a way to describe various learning experiences.
  • PowerPoint, along with other forms of computer projections has quickly become the standard for classroom lecture presentation. There are many benefits: Visual Information : With Powerpoint, you can now greatly expand the visual content of lectures along the usual written information.   Clarity : All lectures can be prepared before class with attention of detail to areas that are not clear.   Location : With the lecture on the computer projector screen, you are more free to face the class, note their perception, and engage their response. Efficiency : Lectures can be revised after a class for later use, easing the preparation for future classes on the same topic.
  • Bullets – 6x6 or 8x8 Graphics – Left Justified No text overload 32 – 40 points Stick with template color schemes
  • Digital video segments, whether embedded in ppt files or shown separately, can show historical footage or re-created events, demonstrate processes or events that cannot easily be replicated in labs, or slow down and analyze motion.   However, because students are often used to relaxing or “tuning out” when the TV comes on, it is important to do what you can to make sure that your use of videos facilitates student learning.
  • Know the video file ahead of time. You can then develop exercises and discussion questions based on the video, highlight key areas for the class, and know where to stop the video or fast-forward through it. Often you will only need a short segment to make your point or illustrate a concept. • Prepare the class for the video. Let them know what they are about to see, how it connects to what they have been learning, and things to look for when viewing. • Make the film important to students. Consider preparing a list of questions that let students know they will need to pay attention to the content of the video. You may want to stop the film at key points (though not too often) to focus students’ attention on particular issues or situations, and you may want to have a discussion about the video after it is over. Make sure students know that the material covered in the film will be on tests, or that they will need to address it in their papers.  
  • As more of lectures become converted to digital form (i.e., ppt), the expectation of students is to have them available before lecture so that they can be downloaded. Students can either make paper copies of the lectures for making class notes or save the file so as to make computer-based notes while in class. However, the availability of the digital form of lectures can lead to a negative impact on class attendance. Faculty need to find means to address this issue.
  • The internet offers seemingly unlimited potential to encourage learning. However, unless you plan carefully how you will use the web in your teaching, you may find that your students do little more than surf through your class. Using e-mail can help you stay in touch with students and to get discussions going on class topics. You will need to decide whether student participation will be mandatory. Some instructors require that all students send a specific number of messages a week, and factor this into the participation grade. Other instructors use e-mail listservs, but do not require students to participate. The Web can be a valuable research tool, helping students access resources in other universities or nations, and letting them learn about other cultures. However, many students fall into the trap of using the Web as their only research tool. There are several things you can do to avoid this problem: Set clear expectations for your students. You can encourage students to access resources on the Web, but also make it clear that students must have citations from other, more traditional sources such as books and print journals. Point your students in the right direction. Try not simply to send students off to do research on the Web. Instead, show them in class what you consider to be quality material gleaned from the Web. You can also point them to selected Web sites as places to start, leading them in the direction of good information.
  • The objectives must be stated in behavioral and measurable terms. They can range from simple to complex, from lower to higher order learning. The objectives may belong to the domains of cognition, psychomotor and affection.
  • Depending upon the objectives the content will also range from simple to high level of complexity. The choice of content must also ensure that there is adequate and correct provision for the achievement of objectives.
  • It is important to match the learning objectives and decide the media to synchronize the design and learning from it. Each media can offer either the whole or part of the content with or without referring to one another. For example, dissection of a frog can be shown through animation and also through a video program. But as multimedia offers interactivity, learners can actually feel the dissection if it is animated and the multimedia program runs like an actual dissection. Similarly, for language learning through multimedia, audio is very important.
  • Without evaluation, one would rarely, if ever, understand the achievement of objectives, which is the primary goal of instructional design.
  • Practicality: Is the intended media practical in that the media is available, cost efficient, time efficient, and understood by the instructor? Student Appropriateness: Is the intended media appropriate for the developmental and experiential levels of the students? Instructional Appropriateness: Is the intended media appropriate for the planned instructional strategy? Will the media allow for the presentation of the proposed lesson in an efficient and effective manner? Will the media facilitate the students’ acquisition of the specific learning objectives?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Instructional MultimediaDevelopmenthttp://pinoyguro.net
    • 2. Multimedia• Used to describe ways to convey messages and information.• A computer-aided instruction (CAI) or instructional presentation that combines text, graphics, video, and audio, and may include interactivity options.
    • 3. Multimedia is:• Interesting!• Compelling!• People like using it!• Students learn from it!• It works!• Anyone can develop a package;• Just point and click!
    • 4. Research by Mayer, McCarthy and Walton• Multimedia has gained acceptance with many benefits derived from its use.• Learning gains are 56% greater,• Consistency of learning is 50-60% better• Content retention is 25-50% higher
    • 5. • Instructional multimedia focuses on what the learner is expected to do upon the completion of the instruction.
    • 6. Three Basic Categories• Electronic communication• Presentation support,• or student materials.
    • 7. Electronic Communication• email,• bulletin boards• discussion groups/forum• conferencing• social media• etc
    • 8. Presentation Support• using the computer to enhance a lecture• set slides to show a movie clip or pictures• play sequentially or pick slides at random
    • 9. Student Materials• programs used by students either alone or in class• design a module to address many different instructional goals• give drill-and-practice opportunities
    • 10. Instructional Multimedia Development Processimplicit goals that media can help achieveare the following:• attracting attention• developing interest• adjusting the learning climate• promoting acceptance (of an idea)
    • 11. Benefits of Using Multimedia• Visual Information• Clarity• Location• Efficiency
    • 12. Basic PowerPoint Guidelines• Keep it simple• Make bullet points• Use graphics• Keep wording concise• Keep font size large• Stick with Standards
    • 13. Video Files• can show historical footage or re-created events• demonstrate processes or events• slow down and analyze motion.
    • 14. Here are some tips• Know the video file ahead of time• Prepare the class for the video• Make the film important to students
    • 15. Instructional Issues with Current Technology• student’s expectation• making class notes or save the file so as to make computer-based notes while in class.• availability of the digital form of lectures can lead to a negative impact on class attendance
    • 16. Instructional Issues with Current Technology• The Internet - many students fall into the trap of using the WebSeveral things to consider to avoid this problem:• Set clear expectations for the students• Point the students in the right direction
    • 17. Components of Instructional Design for Multimedia Learning System1. Objectives.The first challenge is to specify theobjectives of the multimedia learning.
    • 18. Components of Instructional Design for Multimedia Learning System2. Content.The content of any instructional design isnecessarily informed by stated objectives oflearning.
    • 19. Components of Instructional Design for Multimedia Learning System3. Media Options.Essentially incorporate several media liketext (as in printed text), audio, video,graphics, animation etc.
    • 20. Components of Instructional Design for Multimedia Learning System4. Evaluation Options.Evaluation is part of instructional design.
    • 21. Major criteria for selecting instructional media•Practicality•Student appropriateness•Instructional appropriateness
    • 22. ConclusionsThe field of computer-aided instruction andmultimedia is new.Using it effectively requires deliberatethought and attention to detail.In its new life, we are just beginning to learnwhat effective use is for this technology.
    • 23. ConclusionsWe think it has the potential of addressingmany educational issues.By using it to its best potential, we hope tofind solutions to some of todays instructionalchallenges.
    • 24. Thank You.

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