The Unified Modeling Language                         g    g g              R. Akerkar                     CIS 260 Softwar...
A movie project plan   One of the key artifacts in the RUP    framework is the project plan                              ...
The Iterative Model graph of RUP      The horizontal axis       represents time and       shows the dynamic       aspect ...
A movie project plan = a softwaredevelopment project              CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM         ...
A movie project plan = a softwaredevelopment project   In this figure, activities related to making a movie are substitut...
The Essentials of RUP          In all projects, it is important to explore what will           happen if any of these ess...
The Essentials of RUP    6.    No product (prototype)? Get started writing code; just          accumulating paperwork won’...
Next Step: Terminology   Playing with Rational Rose        To create three diagrams in Rational Rose,             the u...
Use Case “A use case specifies the behavior of a system or a part of a system, and i a description of a set of sequences o...
Use Case (Cont’d)                                            A use case is rendered as an ellipse          Register for Co...
Use Case (Cont’d)                                   An actor is rendered as a stick                                   figu...
Use Case (Cont’d)    Actors can participate in a generalization relation with other    actors.    actors              Stud...
Use Case (Cont’d)                            Actors may b connected to use cases                                        be...
Use Case (Cont’d) Here we have a Student interacting with the Registrar and the Billing System via a “Register for Courses...
Draw Use Case Diagram   The diagram describes the functionality of the (simple)    Restaurant System.   The Food Critic ...
Use Cases are represented  U C                     t d  by an oval and Actors are  stick figures.  The box defines the  bo...
Actor and Use Case Diagram                         g                • An actor is a user of a system in a                 ...
Use Cases and Actors  • A scenario is an instance (example) of a use case  • A t i role, not an individual    Actor is l  ...
Use Cases for Borrowing Books                         g                                        Borrow copy                ...
Case Study: Use Cases Drive the DevelopmentProcess   A Process for Writing Use Cases   Step 1: Identify Actors   Step 2...
Step 1: Identify Actors   The actors represent users and external systems    that will interact with the system under dev...
Step 1: Identify Actors (Example)   Potential actors are:   Customer - A customer represents any    C t                 ...
Step 2: Identify Use Cases   This step may be performed simultaneously    with the previous step                        s...
Step 2: Identify Use Cases (Example)   The use cases that emerge    from exploring how each actor    gets value from or p...
Step 3: Prioritize Use Cases   There are two reasons to prioritize use cases.   First, h l determine what order th uses ...
Step 4: Elaborate Use Cases   Developers work from use cases when they    implement th system. Therefore, they must    i ...
Step 4: Elaborate Use Cases (Example)   Purchase an Item - This use case is used by a customer    to purchase an item.   ...
Step 5: Create a Structured Use Case    Model      A use case model shows the       relationships between actors and     ...
Class Diagram •This diagram describes the structure of a simple                       p Restaurant System. •UML shows is_a...
Sequence Diagram   This diagram describes the    sequences of messages of the       q                  g    (simple) Rest...
Collaboration Diagram   A Collaboration diagram    models the interactions    between objects in terms of    sequenced me...
Relationships   In UML, object interconnections, are modeled as relationships.   There are three kinds of relationships in...
Dependency Relationships    p      y            p  A dependency indicates a relationship between two or  more elements.   ...
Generalization Relationships              Person                              A generalization connects a subclass        ...
Generalization Relationships (                            p (Cont’d)                                     )UML permits a cl...
Association Relationships                         p  If two classes in a model need to communicate with each other,  there...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  We can indicate the mul...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  The example indicates t...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  We can also indicate th...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )                    We ca...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )                    We ca...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  We can constrain the as...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  Associations can also b...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )              A class can...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  We can model objects th...
Association Relationships (                         p (Cont’d)                                  )  A composition indicates...
Quiz 1   Consider the following class diagram:   According to this class diagram is there any    way to express, with an...
   No.    No The relationship is boy-likes-girl With the                           boy likes girl.    class diagram above...
Quiz 2Match the UML model with theappropriate interpretation.       i t i t      t ti___ A plan i d       l is dependent o...
Quiz 3   Create an UML class diagram that models the    data relationships described in the following    paragraph.   To...
CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM                Akerkar)                  51
Quiz 4   Use the figure to answer the    three questions below.a. How many portable audio            yp   devices does ea...
   (a) 1 or more.             more   (b) no.   (c) no        no.   A CD player is a portable audio device. All    port...
Quiz 5   What, if anything, is    wrong with the following    model. The model    shows th activities and     h      the ...
   It mixes control flow and data flow                                    flow.   The arrows to and from the "Patient Da...
References   Rational Unified Process, version 5.5, Rational Software    Corporation, Cupertino, CA (1999)   Philippe Kr...
Term Project 1   Option #1 -- Connect Four Game   This project implements the Connect Four game, a more    complex versi...
Term Project 2   Option #2 -- Appointment Book   This project implements a simple appointment book for one person.   Th...
Term Project 3   Option #3 -- Contact List   This project implements a simple name and address book for one user.       ...
Structure of the Project Report   Title Page (Title, Group Members, Course, Year)   Contents Page   Summary of the proj...
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Unified Modelling Language

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Unified Modelling Language

  1. 1. The Unified Modeling Language g g g R. Akerkar CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 1
  2. 2. A movie project plan One of the key artifacts in the RUP framework is the project plan plan. The project plan details the tasks, schedule, cost, resources, milestones, cost resources milestones and deliverables needed to complete the project. Progress is tracked against the plan and measured by work completed by milestones reached and results delivered. The plan is conceived early in the project and frequently updated throughout the lifecycle. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 2
  3. 3. The Iterative Model graph of RUP The horizontal axis represents time and shows the dynamic aspect of the process as it is enacted, and it is expressed in terms of cycles, phases, iterations, and milestones. The vertical axis represents the static aspect of the p p process: how it is described in terms of activities, artifacts, workers and workflows. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R. 10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 3
  4. 4. A movie project plan = a softwaredevelopment project CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 4
  5. 5. A movie project plan = a softwaredevelopment project In this figure, activities related to making a movie are substituted for the RUP disciplines.  Developing the screenplay is analogous to writing requirements,  filming corresponds to implementation, and  producing the movie is more or less like project management. Dividing the timeline into four p g phases pputs the focus on different aspects of the movie project at different times. We also see that the activities run in parallel, typically exchanging information and work packages in a highly efficient, cross-functional manner: f  just as the RUP. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 5
  6. 6. The Essentials of RUP  In all projects, it is important to explore what will happen if any of these essentials is ignored.  For example: 1. No vision? You may lose track of where you are going. 2. No plan? You will not be able to track progress. 3. No risk list? You may be focusing on the wrong issues now. 4. No issues li ? With t accountability, th N i list? Without t bilit these are th the roadblocks to success. 5. No architecture? You may be unable to handle communication, synchronization, communication synchronization and data access issues as they arise. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 6
  7. 7. The Essentials of RUP 6. No product (prototype)? Get started writing code; just accumulating paperwork won’t get you very far; get won t something working in front of the customers. 7. No evaluation? Don’t keep your head in the sand. It is important to face the truth How close are you really to your truth. deadline? To your goals in quality or budget? 8. No change requests? How do you keep track of these? 9. No user support? What happens when a user has a question or can’t figure out how to use the product? CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 7
  8. 8. Next Step: Terminology Playing with Rational Rose  To create three diagrams in Rational Rose,  the use-case diagram,  the sequence diagram, and  the class diagram diagram. Rational Rose is a program that allows you to build models based on the Unified Modeling Language (UML).  The Th use-case didiagrams allow you t see all th scenarios and ll to ll the i d how the users act on them.  The sequence diagrams allow you to elaborate on each of the use cases by showing example objects and messages that are passed between these objects.  The class diagram describes the types of objects in the program and how they are related to each other. g y CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 8
  9. 9. Use Case “A use case specifies the behavior of a system or a part of a system, and i a description of a set of sequences of actions, d is d i i f f f i including variants, that a system performs to yield an observable result of value to an actor.” - The UML User Guide, [Booch,99] “An actor is an idealization of an external person, process, or An person process thing interacting with a system, subsystem, or class. An actor characterizes the interactions that outside users may have with the system.” h ” - The UML Reference Manual, [Rumbaugh,99] CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 9
  10. 10. Use Case (Cont’d) A use case is rendered as an ellipse Register for Courses in a use case diagram. A use case is diagram always labeled with its name. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 10
  11. 11. Use Case (Cont’d) An actor is rendered as a stick figure in a use case diagram. diagram Each actor participates in one or more use cases. Student CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 11
  12. 12. Use Case (Cont’d) Actors can participate in a generalization relation with other actors. actors Student Person CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 12
  13. 13. Use Case (Cont’d) Actors may b connected to use cases be d only by associations. Register for Courses Student CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 13
  14. 14. Use Case (Cont’d) Here we have a Student interacting with the Registrar and the Billing System via a “Register for Courses” use case. Billing System Student Register for Courses Registrar CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 14
  15. 15. Draw Use Case Diagram The diagram describes the functionality of the (simple) Restaurant System. The Food Critic actor can Eat Food, Pay for Food, or Drink Wine. Only the Chef Actor can Cook Food. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 15
  16. 16. Use Cases are represented U C t d by an oval and Actors are stick figures. The box defines the boundaries of the Restaurant System CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 16
  17. 17. Actor and Use Case Diagram g • An actor is a user of a system in a particular role. An A actor can b h be human or an external l BookBorrower system. • A use case is a a task that an actor needs to perform with the help of the Borrow book system. system CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 17
  18. 18. Use Cases and Actors • A scenario is an instance (example) of a use case • A t i role, not an individual Actor is l t i di id l (e.g., librarian can have many roles) • Actor must be a "beneficiary" of the use case (e.g., not librarian who processes book when borrowed) In UML the system boundary is the set of use cases. UML, cases CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 18
  19. 19. Use Cases for Borrowing Books g Borrow copy of book BookBorrower Return copy of book Reserve book Extend loan CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 19
  20. 20. Case Study: Use Cases Drive the DevelopmentProcess A Process for Writing Use Cases Step 1: Identify Actors Step 2: Identify Use Cases Step 3: Prioritize Use Cases Step 4: Elaborate Use Cases Step 5: Create a Structured Use Case Model CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 20
  21. 21. Step 1: Identify Actors The actors represent users and external systems that will interact with the system under development. development One way to identify actors is to list the specific users that will use the system and then organize them into y g categories based on their role or the purpose they have for using the system. Example: Consider th t k of fi di actors f a software C id the task f finding t for ft system which simulates a virtual mall. A virtual mall connects buyers and merchants merchants. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 21
  22. 22. Step 1: Identify Actors (Example) Potential actors are: Customer - A customer represents any C t t t person who uses the services of the virtual mall. mall Affiliate - An affiliate represents a person or organization who is authorized to sell merchandise at the virtual mall. Credit Bureau - A credit bureau represents p an external system used to verify the creditworthiness of a customer. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 22
  23. 23. Step 2: Identify Use Cases This step may be performed simultaneously with the previous step step. Many development projects start with a high- level list of desired features features. For example, the feature list for a virtual mall might include:  1) list item for sale,  2) browse items for sale, )  3) purchase an item.  Each feature is a potential use case. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 23
  24. 24. Step 2: Identify Use Cases (Example) The use cases that emerge from exploring how each actor gets value from or provides value to the system are: Browse I B Inventory - Thi use t This case is used by a customer to shop for items to purchase. Purchase an Item - This use case is used by a customer to purchase an item. Offer Item For Sale - This use case is used by an affiliate to make an item available for purchase. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 24
  25. 25. Step 3: Prioritize Use Cases There are two reasons to prioritize use cases. First, h l determine what order th uses cases Fi t it helps d t i h t d the will be implemented.  Implementing the highest priority use cases first reduces the risk a high priority item wont make the schedule and provides more time to insure the item is implemented correctly. correctly Second, a prioritized list of use cases helps establish architecture.  A system structure that is organized around high priority use cases tends to be more stable over time. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 25
  26. 26. Step 4: Elaborate Use Cases Developers work from use cases when they implement th system. Therefore, they must i l t the t Th f th t contain all the details of interaction between actors and the system system. Its convenient to organize the interaction between a use case and it associated actors b t d its i t d t as a flow of events. Each th through th use case i called a E h path th h the is ll d scenario. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 26
  27. 27. Step 4: Elaborate Use Cases (Example) Purchase an Item - This use case is used by a customer to purchase an item. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 27
  28. 28. Step 5: Create a Structured Use Case Model A use case model shows the relationships between actors and use cases. Apply to Become an Affiliate and Purchase Item are both generalized b th V if C dit li d by the Verify Credit use case. Verify Credit is an abstract use case. case  The two concrete use cases Apply to Become an Affiliate and Purchase Item both include the behavior described by Verify Credit plus more more. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R. 10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 28
  29. 29. Class Diagram •This diagram describes the structure of a simple p Restaurant System. •UML shows is_a relationships with a triangle; and containers with diamond shape CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 29
  30. 30. Sequence Diagram This diagram describes the sequences of messages of the q g (simple) Restaurant System. This diagram represents a Patron ordering food, eating g , g the food, drinking wine, then paying for the food. The dotted lines extending g downwards indicate the timeline. The arrows represent p messages (stimuli) from an actor or object to other objects. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 30
  31. 31. Collaboration Diagram A Collaboration diagram models the interactions between objects in terms of sequenced messages. Collaboration diagrams represent a combination of information taken from Class, Sequence, and Use Cases Diagrams Collaboration and sequence diagrams d di describe th same ib the information, and can be transformed into one another without difficulty. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 31
  32. 32. Relationships In UML, object interconnections, are modeled as relationships. There are three kinds of relationships in UML: • dependencies • generalizations li ti • associations CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 32
  33. 33. Dependency Relationships p y p A dependency indicates a relationship between two or more elements. elements The dependency from CourseSchedule to Course exists because Course is used in both the add and remove operations of CourseSchedule. C S h d l CourseSchedule C S h d l Course add(c : Course) Co rse) remove(c : Course) CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 33
  34. 34. Generalization Relationships Person A generalization connects a subclass to its superclass. It denotes an p inheritance of attributes and behavior from the superclass to the subclass and indicates a specialization in the subclass of the more general superclass. Student CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 34
  35. 35. Generalization Relationships ( p (Cont’d) )UML permits a class to inherit from multiple superclasses,although some programming languages (e.g., Java) do not permit (e gmultiple inheritance. Student Employee TeachingAssistant CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 35
  36. 36. Association Relationships p If two classes in a model need to communicate with each other, there must be link between them. them An association denotes that link. Student Instructor CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 36
  37. 37. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can indicate the multiplicity of an association by adding multiplicity adornments to the line denoting the association. association The example indicates that a Student has one or more Instructors: Student Instructor 1..* CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 37
  38. 38. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) The example indicates that every Instructor has one or more Students: Student Instructor 1..* CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 38
  39. 39. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can also indicate the behavior of an object in an association (i.e., (i e the role of an object) using rolenames rolenames. teaches learns from Student Instructor 1..* 1..* CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 39
  40. 40. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can also name the association. membership Student Team 1..* 1..* CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 40
  41. 41. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can specify dual associations. member of 1..* 1..* Student Team 1 president of 1..* CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 41
  42. 42. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can constrain the association relationship by defining the navigability of the association. g y Here, a Router object requests services from a DNS object by sending messages to (invoking the operations of) the server. The server direction of the association indicates that the server has no knowledge of the Router. Router DomainNameServer CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 42
  43. 43. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) Associations can also be objects themselves, called link classes or an association classes. Registration modelNumber d lN b serialNumber warrentyCode y Product Warranty CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 43
  44. 44. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) A class can have a self association. next LinkedListNode previous CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 44
  45. 45. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) We can model objects that contain other objects by way of special associations called aggregations and compositions. p gg g p An aggregation specifies a whole-part relationship between an aggregate (a whole) and a constituent part, where the part can part exist independently from the aggregate. Aggregations are denoted by a hollow-diamond adornment on the association. Engine Car Transmission CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 45
  46. 46. Association Relationships ( p (Cont’d) ) A composition indicates a strong ownership and coincident lifetime of parts by the whole (i.e., they live and die as a p y ( , y whole). Compositions are denoted by a filled-diamond adornment on the association. Scrollbar 1 1 Window Titlebar 1 1 Menu 1 1 .. * CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 46
  47. 47. Quiz 1 Consider the following class diagram: According to this class diagram is there any way to express, with an object diagram, that Jane (a g ) likes Brian ( boy)? ( girl) (a y) Answer  CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 47
  48. 48.  No. No The relationship is boy-likes-girl With the boy likes girl. class diagram above there is no way to express that a g likes a boy. p girl y CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 48
  49. 49. Quiz 2Match the UML model with theappropriate interpretation. i t i t t ti___ A plan i d l is dependent on a d t a. document. (dependency)___ Plan first, then document. first document b.___ A plan is a special type of document. (generalization) (g ) c. c CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:25 AM Akerkar) 49
  50. 50. Quiz 3 Create an UML class diagram that models the data relationships described in the following paragraph. To be a collector you have to have one or more collections. Each collection must have 2 or more items. E h collection b l it Each ll ti belongs t one collector. A to ll t collection is made up of items owned. A particular item may be in more than one collection Answer  CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 50
  51. 51. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 51
  52. 52. Quiz 4 Use the figure to answer the three questions below.a. How many portable audio yp devices does each student own?b. Can there be a portable audio p device not owned by any student?c. Can there be a CD player not p y owned by any student? Answer  CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 52
  53. 53.  (a) 1 or more. more (b) no. (c) no no. A CD player is a portable audio device. All portable audio d i t bl di devices hhave t b owned b to be d by exactly one student, so any CD player must be owned by exactly one student student. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 53
  54. 54. Quiz 5 What, if anything, is wrong with the following model. The model shows th activities and h the ti iti d data flows during a visit to a doctor s office. doctors Answer  A CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 54
  55. 55.  It mixes control flow and data flow flow. The arrows to and from the "Patient Data" store represent data flow flow. All other arrows are control flow arrows. Because of this its not a valid activity this, it s diagram or data flow diagram. Mixing control flow and data flow is confusing. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 55
  56. 56. References Rational Unified Process, version 5.5, Rational Software Corporation, Cupertino, CA (1999) Philippe Kruchten, The Rational Unified Process—An Introduction, Addison-Wesley-Longman, Reading, MA (1999) Ivar Jacobson, Grady Booch, Jim Rumbaugh, The Unified Software Development Process, Addison-Wesley (1999) Grady Booch, et al., UML User’s Guide, Addison-Wesley- Longman, Reading Longman Reading, MA (1999). (1999) Stefan Bergstrand, Adopting the Rational Unified Process: Success with the RUP, Addison Wesley (2004). Introduction to the IBM Rational Unified Process Essentials, an article by Mats Wessberg (2005). CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 56
  57. 57. Term Project 1 Option #1 -- Connect Four Game This project implements the Connect Four game, a more complex version of tic-tac-toe. The game board is seven squares across and six squares tall. The winner is the first person to get four of their markers in a row (vertical, horizontal, or di ( ti l h i t l diagonal). Th wrinkle i th t th b d i l) The i kl is that the board is standing upright and you can only add markers from the top. (So a marker only can be placed at the bottom of a column, or directly on top of an existing marker ) marker.) You will write a program that plays this game against a human user. The two main parts of the program are the user interface and strategy algorithm. The program needs to play reasonably well (it cannot make random moves), but does not have to be provably optimal or play without errors. CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 57
  58. 58. Term Project 2 Option #2 -- Appointment Book This project implements a simple appointment book for one person. The user should be able to:  Create new appointments.  Delete existing appointments.  List all appointments on a given date.  List all appointments in a range of dates.  List all appointments in a given category. Each appointment contains the following information:  Date and time of appointment.  Length of appointment.  Description of the appointment.  A "category" for the appointment. Optional features:  Search appointments for a matching string.  Edit existing appointments.  Warn user of conflicting appointments (when creating a new one). CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 58
  59. 59. Term Project 3 Option #3 -- Contact List This project implements a simple name and address book for one user. p j p p  The user should be able to:  Create new contacts.  Delete existing contacts.  Search for (and display) a person by last name or first name Should handle name. multiple matches.  Edit existing contacts. Each contact contains the following information:  First name last name name, name.  Street address, town, state, zip code.  Phone number, email address. A "notes" field, where the user can enter any information. Optional features:  Search contacts for a matching string (other than name). CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 59
  60. 60. Structure of the Project Report Title Page (Title, Group Members, Course, Year) Contents Page Summary of the project Requirements (purpose, functional, non-functional (purpose functional non functional, constraints) Design ( g (DFD level 1, Use case, Sequence q diagram, Algorithms etc) User Interface (Screen Shots) Coding Reports, if any CIS 260 Software Engineering - I (R.10:16:26 AM Akerkar) 60

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