Foundations of individual beh.
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Foundations of individual beh.

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Organizational behavior

Organizational behavior

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Foundations of individual beh. Foundations of individual beh. Presentation Transcript

  • ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
  • O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Define the key biographical characteristics. 2. Identify two types of ability. 3. Shape the behavior of others.L E A R N I N G 4. Distinguish between the four schedules of reinforcement. 5. Clarify the role of punishment in learning. 6. Practice self-management 7. Exhibit effective discipline skills. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 2–2
  • Biographical CharacteristicsBiographical Characteristics© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–3
  • AbilityAbility© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–4
  • Dimensions of Dimensions of Intellectual Ability Intellectual Ability ••Number aptitude Number aptitude ••Verbal comprehension Verbal comprehension ••Perceptual speed Perceptual speed ••Inductive reasoning Inductive reasoning ••Deductive reasoning Deductive reasoning ••Spatial visualization Spatial visualization ••Memory Memory© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 2-1All rights reserved. 2–5
  • Physical AbilityPhysical Ability© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–6
  • Nine Physical AbilitiesNine Physical Abilities Strength Factors Strength Factors • •Dynamic strength Dynamic strength • •Trunk strength Trunk strength • •Static strength Static strength • •Explosive strength Explosive strength Flexibility Factors Flexibility Factors • •Extent flexibility Extent flexibility • •Dynamic flexibility Dynamic flexibility Other Factors Other Factors • •Body coordination Body coordination • •Balance Balance • •Stamina Stamina© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 2-2All rights reserved. 2–7
  • The Ability-Job FitThe Ability-Job Fit Ability-Job Employee’s Fit Job’s Ability Abilities Requirements© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–8
  • LearningLearning Learning Learning ••Involves change Involves change ••Is relatively permanent Is relatively permanent ••Is acquired through experience Is acquired through experience© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–9
  • Theories of LearningTheories of Learning Key Concepts Key Concepts ••Unconditioned stimulus Unconditioned stimulus ••Unconditioned response Unconditioned response ••Conditioned response Conditioned response© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–10
  • Theories of Learning (cont’d)Theories of Learning (cont’d) Key Concepts Key Concepts ••Reflexive (unlearned) behavior Reflexive (unlearned) behavior ••Conditioned (learned) behavior Conditioned (learned) behavior ••Reinforcement Reinforcement© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–11
  • Theories of Learning (cont’d)Theories of Learning (cont’d) Key Concepts Key Concepts ••Attention processes Attention processes ••Retention processes Retention processes ••Motor reproduction processes Motor reproduction processes ••Reinforcement processes Reinforcement processes© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–12
  • Theories of Learning (cont’d)Theories of Learning (cont’d) Key Concepts Key Concepts ••Reinforcement is required to change behavior. Reinforcement is required to change behavior. ••Some rewards are more effective than others. Some rewards are more effective than others. ••The timing of reinforcement affects learning The timing of reinforcement affects learning speed and permanence. speed and permanence.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–13
  • Schedules of ReinforcementSchedules of Reinforcement© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–14
  • Schedules of Reinforcement (cont’d)Schedules of Reinforcement (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–15
  • Schedules of ReinforcementSchedules of ReinforcementFixed-ratio© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 2-4All rights reserved. 2–16
  • Intermittent Schedules of Reinforcement Intermittent Schedules of Reinforcement© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 2-5aAll rights reserved. 2–17
  • Intermittent Schedules of Reinforcement (cont’d) Intermittent Schedules of Reinforcement (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 2-5bAll rights reserved. 2–18
  • Behavior ModificationBehavior Modification Problem-solving Model Problem-solving Model ••Identify critical behaviors Identify critical behaviors ••Develop baseline data Develop baseline data ••Identify behavioral consequences Identify behavioral consequences ••Apply intervention Apply intervention •• Hall Inc. performance improvement© 2003 PrenticeEvaluate performance improvement EvaluateAll rights reserved. 2–19
  • OB MOD Organizational ApplicationsOB MOD Organizational Applications Well Pay versus Sick Pay – Reduce absenteeism by rewarding attendance, not absence. Employee Discipline – The use of punishment can be counter-productive. Developing Training Programs – OB MOD methods improve training effectiveness. Self-management – Reduces the need for external management control.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 2–20