Conflict
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Organizational behavior

Organizational behavior

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Conflict Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
  • 2. O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Define conflict. 2. Differentiate between the traditional, human relations, and interactionist views of conflict.L E A R N I N G 3. Contrast task, relationship, and process conflict. 4. Outline the conflict process. 5. Describe the five conflict-handling intentions. 6. Contrast distributive and integrative bargaining. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 14–2
  • 3. O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d) AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 7. Identify the five steps in the negotiating process. 8. Describe cultural differences in negotiations.L E A R N I N G © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 14–3
  • 4. Transitions in Conflict ThoughtTransitions in Conflict Thought Causes: Causes: •• Poor communication Poor communication •• Lack of openness Lack of openness •• Failure to respond to Failure to respond to employee needs employee needs© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 14–4
  • 5. Transitions in Conflict Thought (cont’d)Transitions in Conflict Thought (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 14–5
  • 6. Functional versus Dysfunctional ConflictFunctional versus Dysfunctional Conflict© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 14–6
  • 7. Types of ConflictTypes of Conflict© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 14–7
  • 8. The Conflict ProcessThe Conflict Process© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14-1All rights reserved. 14–8
  • 9. Stage I: Potential Opposition or IncompatibilityStage I: Potential Opposition or Incompatibility Communication – Semantic difficulties, misunderstandings, and “noise” Structure – Size and specialization of jobs – Jurisdictional clarity/ambiguity – Member/goal incompatibility – Leadership styles (close or participative) – Reward systems (win-lose) – Dependence/interdependence of groups Personal Variables – Differing individual value systems – Personality types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 14–9
  • 10. Stage II: Cognition and PersonalizationStage II: Cognition and Personalization Conflict Definition Conflict Definition Negative Emotions Negative Emotions Positive Feelings Positive Feelings© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 10
  • 11. Stage III: IntentionsStage III: Intentions Cooperativeness: Cooperativeness: • • Attempting to satisfy Attempting to satisfy the other party’s the other party’s concerns. concerns. Assertiveness: Assertiveness: • • Attempting to satisfy Attempting to satisfy one’s own concerns. one’s own concerns.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 11
  • 12. Stage III: Intentions (cont’d)Stage III: Intentions (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 12
  • 13. Stage III: Intentions (cont’d)Stage III: Intentions (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 13
  • 14. Dimensions of Conflict-Handling IntentionsDimensions of Conflict-Handling Intentions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-2All rights reserved. 14
  • 15. Stage IV: BehaviorStage IV: Behavior© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 15
  • 16. Stage IV: Conflict Resolution TechniquesStage IV: Conflict Resolution Techniques •• Problem solving Problem solving •• Superordinate goals Superordinate goals •• Expansion of resources Expansion of resources •• Avoidance Avoidance •• Smoothing Smoothing •• Compromise Compromise •• Authoritative command Authoritative command •• Altering the human variable Altering the human variable •• Altering the structural variables Altering the structural variables© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 16
  • 17. Stage IV: Conflict Stimulation TechniquesStage IV: Conflict Stimulation Techniques •• Communication Communication •• Bringing in outsiders Bringing in outsiders •• Restructuring the organization Restructuring the organization •• Appointing a devil’s advocate Appointing a devil’s advocate© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 17
  • 18. Conflict-Intensity ContinuumConflict-Intensity Continuum© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-3All rights reserved. 18
  • 19. Stage V: OutcomesStage V: Outcomes Functional Outcomes from Conflict – Increased group performance – Improved quality of decisions – Stimulation of creativity and innovation – Encouragement of interest and curiosity – Provision of a medium for problem-solving – Creation of an environment for self-evaluation and change Creating Functional Conflict – Reward dissent and punish conflict avoiders© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 19
  • 20. Stage V: Outcomes (cont’d)Stage V: Outcomes (cont’d) Dysfunctional Outcomes from Conflict – Development of discontent – Reduced group effectiveness – Retarded communication – Reduced group cohesiveness – Infighting among group members overcomes group goals© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 20
  • 21. NegotiationNegotiation© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 21
  • 22. Bargaining StrategiesBargaining Strategies© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 22
  • 23. Distributive versus Integrative BargainingDistributive versus Integrative Bargaining© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-5All rights reserved. 23
  • 24. Staking Out the Bargaining ZoneStaking Out the Bargaining Zone© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-6All rights reserved. 24
  • 25. The The Negotiation Negotiation Process Process© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-7All rights reserved. 25
  • 26. Issues in Negotiation Issues in Negotiation The Role of Personality Traits in Negotiation – Traits do not appear to have a significantly direct effect on the outcomes of either bargaining or negotiating processes. Gender Differences in Negotiations – Women negotiate no differently from men, although men apparently negotiate slightly better outcomes. – Men and women with similar power bases use the same negotiating styles. – Women’s attitudes toward negotiation and their success as negotiators are less favorable than men’s.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 26
  • 27. Third-Party NegotiationsThird-Party Negotiations© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 27
  • 28. Third-Party Negotiations (cont’d)Third-Party Negotiations (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 14–All rights reserved. 28
  • 29. Why U.S. Managers Might Have Trouble in Cross-Why U.S. Managers Might Have Trouble in Cross-Cultural NegotiationsCultural Negotiations© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-8All rights reserved. 29
  • 30. Conflict and Unit PerformanceConflict and Unit Performance© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 14– 14-9aAll rights reserved. 30
  • 31. Conflict Prentice Hall Inc.© 2003 and Unit Performance (cont’d)Conflict and Unit Performance (cont’d) EXHIBIT 14– 14-9bAll rights reserved. 31