ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR                                      S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S                               ...
O B J E C T I V E S                       AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                       YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO:       ...
O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d)                                AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                                YO...
Functions of CommunicationFunctions of Communication  Communication Functions   Communication Functions  1. Control member...
The Communication Process ModelThe Communication Process Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.         EXHIBIT    10-1All rights ...
Direction of CommunicationDirection of Communication                                                 Upward               ...
Interpersonal Communication Interpersonal Communication Oral Communication    – Advantages: Speed and feedback.    – Disa...
Intonations: It’s the Way You Say It! Intonations: It’s the Way You Say It!© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.                EXHIBI...
Three Common Formal Small-Group NetworksThree Common Formal Small-Group Networks© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.        EXHIBIT  ...
Small-Group Networks and EffectivenessSmall-Group Networks and EffectivenessCriteriaCriteria© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.     ...
GrapevineGrapevine Grapevine Characteristics   – Not controlled by management.   – Perceived by most employees as being m...
Suggestions for Reducing the NegativeSuggestions for Reducing the NegativeConsequences of RumorsConsequences of Rumors© 20...
Computer-Aided CommunicationComputer-Aided Communication E-mail    – Advantages: quickly written, sent, and stored; low c...
Emoticons: Showing Emotion in E-MailEmoticons: Showing Emotion in E-Mail© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.          EXHIBIT   10–  ...
Choice of Communication ChannelChoice of Communication Channel       Characteristics of Rich Channels        Characteristi...
Information Richness of Communication Information Richness of CommunicationChannels Channels  Low channel richness        ...
Barriers to Effective CommunicationBarriers to Effective Communication© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.             10–All rights ...
Barriers to Effective Communication (cont’d)Barriers to Effective Communication (cont’d) emotions                      lan...
Communication Barriers Between Men andCommunication Barriers Between Men andWomenWomen Men talk to:               Women ...
Cross-Cultural CommunicationCross-Cultural Communication Cultural Barriers   –   Barriers caused by semantics   –   Barri...
Hand Gestures Mean Different Things inHand Gestures Mean Different Things inDifferent CountriesDifferent Countries© 2003 P...
Hand Gestures Mean Different Things inHand Gestures Mean Different Things inDifferent Countries (cont’d)Different Countrie...
Communication Barriers and Cultural ContextCommunication Barriers and Cultural Context© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.           ...
High-  High-   vs.   vs.  Low-  Low-Context ContextCulturesCultures© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.   EXHIBIT   10–              ...
A Cultural GuideA Cultural Guide  Cultural Context Communication Rules:   Cultural Context Communication Rules:  1. Assume...
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Communication

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Communication

  1. 1. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
  2. 2. O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Describe the communication process. 2. Contrast the advantages and disadvantages of oral versus written communication.L E A R N I N G 3. Compare the effectiveness of the chain, wheel, and all-channel networks. 4. Identify the factors affecting the use of the grapevine. 5. Discuss how computer-aided technology is changing organizational communication. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 10–2
  3. 3. O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d) AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 6. Explain the importance of channel richness to improving communication effectiveness. 7. Identify common barriers to effective communication. 8. List behaviors related to effective active listening.L E A R N I N G 9. Contrast the meaning of talk for men versus women. 10. Describe the potential problems in cross- © 2003 Prentice communication. cultural Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 10–3
  4. 4. Functions of CommunicationFunctions of Communication Communication Functions Communication Functions 1. Control member behavior. 1. Control member behavior. 2. 2. Foster motivation for what is to be done. Foster motivation for what is to be done. 3. 3. Provide a release for emotional expression. Provide a release for emotional expression. 4. Provide information needed to make 4. Provide information needed to make decisions. decisions.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 10–4
  5. 5. The Communication Process ModelThe Communication Process Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10-1All rights reserved. 10–5
  6. 6. Direction of CommunicationDirection of Communication Upward Lateral Downward© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 10–6
  7. 7. Interpersonal Communication Interpersonal Communication Oral Communication – Advantages: Speed and feedback. – Disadvantage: Distortion of the message. Written Communication – Advantages: Tangible and verifiable. – Disadvantages: Time consuming and lacks feedback. Nonverbal Communication – Advantages: Supports other communications and provides observable expression of emotions and feelings. – Disadvantage: Misperception of body language or gestures can influence receiver’s interpretation of message.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 10–7
  8. 8. Intonations: It’s the Way You Say It! Intonations: It’s the Way You Say It!© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10-2All rights reserved. 10–8
  9. 9. Three Common Formal Small-Group NetworksThree Common Formal Small-Group Networks© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10-3All rights reserved. 10–9
  10. 10. Small-Group Networks and EffectivenessSmall-Group Networks and EffectivenessCriteriaCriteria© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-4All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. GrapevineGrapevine Grapevine Characteristics – Not controlled by management. – Perceived by most employees as being more believable and reliable than formal communications. – Largely used to serve the self-interests of those who use it. – Results from: • Desire for information about important situations • Ambiguous conditions • Conditions that cause anxiety© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. Suggestions for Reducing the NegativeSuggestions for Reducing the NegativeConsequences of RumorsConsequences of Rumors© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-5All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. Computer-Aided CommunicationComputer-Aided Communication E-mail – Advantages: quickly written, sent, and stored; low cost for distribution. – Disadvantages: information overload, lack of emotional content, cold and impersonal. Intranet – A private organization-wide information network. Extranet – An information network connecting employees with external suppliers, customers, and strategic partners. Videoconferencing – An extension of an intranet or extranet that permits© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.meetings via video links. face-to-face virtual 10–All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. Emoticons: Showing Emotion in E-MailEmoticons: Showing Emotion in E-Mail© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-6All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. Choice of Communication ChannelChoice of Communication Channel Characteristics of Rich Channels Characteristics of Rich Channels 1. Handle multiple cues simultaneously. 1. Handle multiple cues simultaneously. 2. 2. Facilitate rapid feedback. Facilitate rapid feedback. 3. 3. Are very personal in context. Are very personal in context.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 15
  16. 16. Information Richness of Communication Information Richness of CommunicationChannels Channels Low channel richness High channel richness Routine Nonroutine© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-7All rights reserved. 16
  17. 17. Barriers to Effective CommunicationBarriers to Effective Communication© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 17
  18. 18. Barriers to Effective Communication (cont’d)Barriers to Effective Communication (cont’d) emotions language How a receiver feels at the Words have different time a message is received meanings to different will influence how the people. message is interpreted.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. Communication Barriers Between Men andCommunication Barriers Between Men andWomenWomen Men talk to:  Women talk to: – Emphasize status, – Establish connection power, and and intimacy. independence. – Criticize men for not – Complain that women listening. talk on and on. – Speak of problems to – Offer solutions. promote closeness. – To boast about their – Express regret and accomplishments. restore balance to a conversation.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 19
  20. 20. Cross-Cultural CommunicationCross-Cultural Communication Cultural Barriers – Barriers caused by semantics – Barriers caused by word connotations – Barriers caused by tone differences – Barriers caused by differences among perceptions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. Hand Gestures Mean Different Things inHand Gestures Mean Different Things inDifferent CountriesDifferent Countries© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-10aAll rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. Hand Gestures Mean Different Things inHand Gestures Mean Different Things inDifferent Countries (cont’d)Different Countries (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-10bAll rights reserved. 22
  23. 23. Communication Barriers and Cultural ContextCommunication Barriers and Cultural Context© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. High- High- vs. vs. Low- Low-Context ContextCulturesCultures© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 10– 10-11All rights reserved. 24
  25. 25. A Cultural GuideA Cultural Guide Cultural Context Communication Rules: Cultural Context Communication Rules: 1. Assume differences until similarity is proven. 1. Assume differences until similarity is proven. 2. Emphasize description rather than 2. Emphasize description rather than interpretation or evaluation. interpretation or evaluation. 3. Practice empathy. 3. Practice empathy. 4. Treat your interpretations as a working 4. Treat your interpretations as a working hypothesis. hypothesis.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. 10–All rights reserved. 25

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