ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR                                      S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S                               ...
O B J E C T I V E S                       AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                       YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO:       ...
O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d)                                AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER,                                YO...
What is Personality?What is Personality?© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.   EXHIBIT    4-1All rights reserved.                  4–4
Personality TraitsPersonality Traits                      Personality Determinants                      Personality Determ...
The Myers-Briggs Type IndicatorThe Myers-Briggs Type Indicator                     Personality Types                      ...
Sixteen                             Sixteen                             Primary                             Primary       ...
The Big Five Model                            The Big Five Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.             ...
Major Personality Attributes Influencing OBMajor Personality Attributes Influencing OB   Locus of control   Machiavellia...
Locus of ControlLocus of Control© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.        4–10
MachiavellianismMachiavellianism                  Conditions Favoring High Machs                   Conditions Favoring Hig...
Self-Esteem and Self-MonitoringSelf-Esteem and Self-Monitoring© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.              4...
Risk-TakingRisk-Taking High Risk-taking Managers   – Make quicker decisions.   – Use less information to make decisions. ...
Personality TypesPersonality Types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.        4–14
Personality TypesPersonality Types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.        4–15
Achieving Personality-Job FitAchieving Personality-Job Fit                            Personality Types                   ...
Holland’s                              Holland’s                            Typology of                             Typolo...
Relationships Relationships    among    among Occupational Occupational  Personality  Personality    Types     Types© 2003...
Emotions- Why Emotions Were Ignored in OBEmotions- Why Emotions Were Ignored in OB The “myth of rationality”   – Organiza...
What Are Emotions?What Are Emotions?                              Affect                              Affect              ...
What Are Emotions? (cont’d)What Are Emotions? (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.          4–21
Felt versus Displayed EmotionsFelt versus Displayed Emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved.             4–22
Emotion DimensionsEmotion Dimensions Variety of emotions   – Positive   – Negative Intensity of emotions   – Personality...
Facial Expressions Convey EmotionsFacial Expressions Convey Emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.            EXHIBIT    4-5All...
Emotion ContinuumEmotion Continuum The closer any two emotions are to each other on  the continuum, the more likely peopl...
Gender and EmotionsGender and Emotions Women    –   Can show greater emotional expression.    –   Experience emotions mor...
External Constraints on EmotionsExternal Constraints on Emotions     Organizational     Organizational                    ...
OB Applications of Understanding EmotionsOB Applications of Understanding Emotions Ability and Selection   – Emotions aff...
OB Applications of Understanding EmotionsOB Applications of Understanding Emotions Interpersonal Conflict   – Conflict in...
Ability and SelectionAbility and Selection                             Emotional Intelligence (EI)                       ...
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Ch04

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Organizational behavior

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Ch04

  1. 1. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR S T E P H E N P. R O B B I N S WWW.PRENHALL.COM/ROBBINS T E N T H E D I T I O N© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
  2. 2. O B J E C T I V E S AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 1. Explain the factors that determine an individual’s personality. 2. Describe the MBTI personality framework.L E A R N I N G 3. Identify the key traits in the Big Five personality model. 4. Explain the impact of job typology on the personality/job performance relationship. 5. Differentiate emotions from moods. 6. Contrast felt versus displayed emotions. © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 4–2
  3. 3. O B J E C T I V E S (cont’d) AFTER STUDYING THIS CHAPTER, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO: 7. Read emotions. 8. Explain gender-differences in emotions. 9. Describe external constraints on emotions. 10. Apply concepts on emotions to OB issues.L E A R N I N G © 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. All rights reserved. 4–3
  4. 4. What is Personality?What is Personality?© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-1All rights reserved. 4–4
  5. 5. Personality TraitsPersonality Traits Personality Determinants Personality Determinants ••Heredity Heredity ••Environment Environment ••Situation Situation© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–5
  6. 6. The Myers-Briggs Type IndicatorThe Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Personality Types Personality Types • •Extroverted or Introverted (E or I) Extroverted or Introverted (E or I) • •Sensing or Intuitive (S or N) Sensing or Intuitive (S or N) • •Thinking or Feeling (T or F) Thinking or Feeling (T or F) • •Perceiving or Judging (P or J) Perceiving or Judging (P or J)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–6
  7. 7. Sixteen Sixteen Primary Primary Traits Traits© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-2All rights reserved. 4–7
  8. 8. The Big Five Model The Big Five Model© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–8
  9. 9. Major Personality Attributes Influencing OBMajor Personality Attributes Influencing OB Locus of control Machiavellianism Self-esteem Self-monitoring Propensity for risk taking Type A personality© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–9
  10. 10. Locus of ControlLocus of Control© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–10
  11. 11. MachiavellianismMachiavellianism Conditions Favoring High Machs Conditions Favoring High Machs ••Direct interaction Direct interaction ••Minimal rules and regulations Minimal rules and regulations ••Distracting emotions Distracting emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–11
  12. 12. Self-Esteem and Self-MonitoringSelf-Esteem and Self-Monitoring© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–12
  13. 13. Risk-TakingRisk-Taking High Risk-taking Managers – Make quicker decisions. – Use less information to make decisions. – Operate in smaller and more entrepreneurial organizations. Low Risk-taking Managers – Are slower to make decisions. – Require more information before making decisions. – Exist in larger organizations with stable environments. Risk Propensity – Aligning managers’ risk-taking propensity to job requirements should be beneficial to organizations.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–13
  14. 14. Personality TypesPersonality Types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–14
  15. 15. Personality TypesPersonality Types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–15
  16. 16. Achieving Personality-Job FitAchieving Personality-Job Fit Personality Types Personality Types ••Realistic Realistic ••Investigative Investigative ••Social Social ••Conventional Conventional ••Enterprising Enterprising ••Artistic Artistic© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–16
  17. 17. Holland’s Holland’s Typology of Typology of Personality Personality and and Congruent Congruent Occupations Occupations© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-3All rights reserved. 4–17
  18. 18. Relationships Relationships among among Occupational Occupational Personality Personality Types Types© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-4All rights reserved. 4–18
  19. 19. Emotions- Why Emotions Were Ignored in OBEmotions- Why Emotions Were Ignored in OB The “myth of rationality” – Organizations are not emotion-free. Emotions of any kind are disruptive to organizations. – Original OB focus was solely on the effects of strong negative emotions that interfered with individual and organizational efficiency.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–19
  20. 20. What Are Emotions?What Are Emotions? Affect Affect A broad range of emotions A broad range of emotions that people experience. that people experience. Emotions Emotions Moods Moods Intense feelings that are Intense feelings that are Feelings that tend to be Feelings that tend to be directed at someone or directed at someone or less intense than less intense than something. something. emotions and that lack a emotions and that lack a contextual stimulus. contextual stimulus.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–20
  21. 21. What Are Emotions? (cont’d)What Are Emotions? (cont’d)© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–21
  22. 22. Felt versus Displayed EmotionsFelt versus Displayed Emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–22
  23. 23. Emotion DimensionsEmotion Dimensions Variety of emotions – Positive – Negative Intensity of emotions – Personality – Job Requirements Frequency and duration of emotions – How often emotions are exhibited. – How long emotions are displayed.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–23
  24. 24. Facial Expressions Convey EmotionsFacial Expressions Convey Emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-5All rights reserved. 4–24
  25. 25. Emotion ContinuumEmotion Continuum The closer any two emotions are to each other on the continuum, the more likely people are to confuse them.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. EXHIBIT 4-6All rights reserved. 4–25
  26. 26. Gender and EmotionsGender and Emotions Women – Can show greater emotional expression. – Experience emotions more intensely. – Display emotions more frequently. – Are more comfortable in expressing emotions. – Are better at reading others’ emotions. Men – Believe that displaying emotions is inconsistent with the male image. – Are innately less able to read and to identify with others’ emotions. – Have less need to seek social approval by showing© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc. positive emotions.All rights reserved. 4–26
  27. 27. External Constraints on EmotionsExternal Constraints on Emotions Organizational Organizational Cultural Cultural Influences Influences Influences Influences Individual Individual Emotions Emotions© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–27
  28. 28. OB Applications of Understanding EmotionsOB Applications of Understanding Emotions Ability and Selection – Emotions affect employee effectiveness. Decision Making – Emotions are an important part of the decision-making process in organizations. Motivation – Emotional commitment to work and high motivation are strongly linked. Leadership – Emotions are important to acceptance of messages from organizational leaders.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–28
  29. 29. OB Applications of Understanding EmotionsOB Applications of Understanding Emotions Interpersonal Conflict – Conflict in the workplace and individual emotions are strongly intertwined. Deviant Workplace Behaviors – Negative emotions can lead to employee deviance in the form of actions that violate established norms and threaten the organization and its members. • Productivity failures • Property theft and destruction • Political actions • Personal aggression© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–29
  30. 30. Ability and SelectionAbility and Selection  Emotional Intelligence (EI)  Emotional Intelligence (EI) –– Self-awareness Self-awareness –– Self-management Self-management –– Self-motivation Self-motivation –– Empathy Empathy –– Social skills Social skills  Research Findings  Research Findings –– High EI scores, not high High EI scores, not high IQ scores, characterize IQ scores, characterize high performers. high performers.© 2003 Prentice Hall Inc.All rights reserved. 4–30

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