Introduction - Shakespeare & Tragedy

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A powerpoint presentation about some of the type of works of William Shakespeare, in relation to the school's Drama in Curriculum Programme.

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Introduction - Shakespeare & Tragedy

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION SHAKESPEARE & TRAGEDY
  2. 2. Shakespeare Comedy Tragedy Tragicomedy Macbeth Hamlet King Lear Romeo and Juliet Merchant of Venice Taming of the Shrew Twelfth Night A Midsummer Night’s Dream
  3. 3. Shakespearean Tragedy • Supernatural elements • Comic relief • Tragic hero • Fate and circumstances • Conflict and revenge • Numerous deaths • Catharsis
  4. 4. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564-1616)
  5. 5. QUEEN ELIZABETH I (1533-1603)
  6. 6. QUEEN ELIZABETH I considered to be the greatest Monarch in English history. She ruled alone for half a century, and dazzled even her greatest enemies. Admirable sense of duty. Her genuine love for her subjects was legendary.
  7. 7. THE GLOBE THEATRE
  8. 8. THE GALLERY
  9. 9. THE GALLERY
  10. 10. THE GROUNDLINGS AREA
  11. 11. THE STAGE
  12. 12. THE SIDE STAGE
  13. 13. SHAKESPEAREAN LANGUAGE - VOCABULARY Early Modern English Thy Thee Thou Thine Says’t Yea/ Ay Hast Beseech Ere Moon Modern English Your (poss. adjective) You (object) You (subject) Your (poss. noun) Say Yes Has Beg Before Month
  14. 14. SHAKESPEAREAN LANGUAGE – VOCABULARY Basic verb form Verb Inflections Say Drink Lie Hate Say’st Drink’est Liest Hateth
  15. 15. SHAKESPEAREAN LANGUAGE – SYNTAX Ours His  Subject – Verb – Object order  Eg. I walked the dog. Eg. The dog I walked. I love you not. I do not love you. Object - Subject - Verb order.
  16. 16. - THE END -

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