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Trans 101
 

Trans 101

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This is the Trans* 101 training presentation developed by and for members of the Metro Trans Umbrella Group.

This is the Trans* 101 training presentation developed by and for members of the Metro Trans Umbrella Group.

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  • Hello and welcome to Trans* 101 presented by MTUG! I am so excited to be here with you all today. My name is *insert name* and I will be your presenter for this (morning/afternoon/evening). The objective of this presentation is to provide a brief and basic run down of what Trans* means in order to promote education and understanding of the Trans* community as a whole. [ENTER]
  • Here is what we are going to cover during this training. [ENTER] We will go over a basic definition of what Trans* means. [ENTER] We will discuss gender binary, gender identity, and gender expressions. [ENTER] I will cover the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity. [ENTER] Then we’ll outline some common gender identities. [ENTER] We’ll go over how to respectfully ask questions. [ENTER] How to refer to a Trans* individual. [Enter] After that, we’ll talk about some myths and stereotypes surrounding the Trans* community. [ENTER] Things to avoid when speaking to a Trans* individual. Then after we cover all that material, [ENTER] I’ll take some questions you may have. Let’s get started! [ENTER]
  • So, what does Trans* mean? [ENTER] Trans* is an Umbrellaterm [ENTER] that encompasses a wide variety of gender identities and expressions that do not conform to the gender binary. [Point out the Trans* Umbrella visual aid poster and list off a bunch of the identities] [ENTER]
  • But what is the gender binary, you may be wondering? [ENTER] The gender binary is when sex and gender are catalogued into two distinct and disconnect forms of masculine and feminine. “Men are masculine, females are feminine.” [ENTER x2] Cisgender is a term used for those who feel their self-perception of gender and gender assigned at birth match up. An example could be a person who was assigned male at birth and still identifies with that gender. Cisgenderpeople may not always fit under the gender binary and would there for be going against the gender roles society assigns to them. [ENTER x2] Gender roles are the social and behavioral norms that society considers appropriate for either men or women. [ENTER] Can anyone point out an example of a Gender Role that we commonly encounter in society? [Call on 2-3 people and then continue. If no one raises their hands give a couple examples and then continue.] [ENTER]
  • Gender identity and gender expression are different, what!? Yes, they are! [ENTER] Gender identity is how someone identifies their own gender, where as gender expression is how a person expresses their gender. So when we’re talking about identity we’re discussion terms like [ENTER] boy, [ENTER] girl, [ENTER] Transgender, [ENTER] Gender Queer, [ENTER] etc. Expression would be things like [ENTER] clothing, [ENTER] mannerisms, [ENTER] behavior, [ENTER] speech patterns, [ENTER] and the like. [ENTER]
  • Fact or myth: Gender identity determines your sexual orientation? [Pause for answers] [ENTER] This is indeed a myth! [ENTER]Gender identity may help develop a label for their sexual orientation but it does not determine who they may be attracted to. [ENTER]
  • So as we discussed before, Gender identity is how someone identifies their gender. [ENTER]Sexual orientation is an individual’s enduring physical, romantic, emotional, and/or spiritual attraction to another person. Regardless of gender identity, a person could identify their sexual orientation as gay, straight, bisexual, lesbian, etc. [ENTER]
  • Fact or Myth: Gender and Sex are not the same thing. [Pause for answers] [ENTER] Fact! [ENTER] Sex refers to a person’s biological anatomy (male/female) where as gender refers to a person’s psychological identity (man/woman).[Point out the Gender Bread visual aid][ENTER]
  • Now lets get into some Gender Identities. Please keep in mind that this list is no where near all inclusive and that the definition of these terms may be different for some people. These definitions we are using are the way the majority of the community uses them. [ENTER] Transgender is an adjective and it includes people who identify with a gender other than their birth assigned gender. Keep in mind that Transgender is an adjective, not a noun. So the proper use would be “They are transgender” not “They are a transgender.” Transgender describes a person. It should also never be used in the past tense, that would cause it to be used as a verb and Transgender is not something you do it’s something you are. You can’t run, skip, and Transgender; that’s not how it works! Anyway, moving on! [ENTER] Male to Female or MTF would describe someone who was assigned male at birth but identifies as female. Female to Male, or FTM, would describe someone assigned female at birth but identifies as male. [ENTER]
  • [ENTER] Gender Queer is also an adjective and this term refers to a person who feels their gender changes or it fluid. [ENTER] Intersex is a general term used for a person who is born with reproductive sexual anatomy that is ambiguous. [ENTER] Androgynous and Gender Neutral are those who do not identify distinctly with any specific gender. [ENTER]
  • Here is a list of some Gender Expressions. [ENTER] This list is not all inclusive but we have feminine, masculine, drag kings and drag queens, butch, femme, cross-dresser, and androgynous. [Pause for a few seconds and then press enter]
  • One way to look at the three side by side is to use the [ENTER] Sex/Gender/Sexual Orientation Triangle. [ENTER] One side is sex which is the body and our biology. [ENTER] Another side illustrates gender which is a cultural thing that includes gender expression, gender roles, and gender identity. [ENTER] The other side is Sexual orientation which is attractions and relationships. This corner would show sexual desire, sexual behavior, and sexual identity. Three separate components with endless possibilities of combinations. [ENTER]
  • So, if you know someone who identifies as Trans* and you have a question, how should you approach them? [ENTER] Well it’s important that you start off by first self-reflecting. [ENTER] Why are you asking the question? [ENTER] Is it really something you need to know? [ENTER] Is this maybe something you could research on your own? [ENTER] Considering the type of relationship you have with this person, is it appropriate to ask this question? [ENTER] Keep in mind that curiosity does not warrant us to having an answer. Some things are not ok to ask certain people and it’s important to be respectful of those boundaries. [ENTER]
  • Before asking a questions, [ENTER] it’s very important to obtain verbal permission from the individual to ask them questions. Not everyone is ok with answering personal questions. Some topics may be triggering for individuals. You never know until you ask. [ENTER] It’s also good to keep in mind that not every Trans* narrative is the same. Some people seek out medical transitions, some have no intentions of doing so. Some want to change their names, some don’t. [ENTER] It’s a good rule of thumb to just avoid all specific questions (like “when will have surgery X?” “How is your family doing with you coming out as identity Y?”) until you’ve been told their intentions by the person. [ENTER] Maybe you could start out by asking, “Where are you in your journey?” [ENTER]
  • When you are referring to a Trans* persons, [ENTER] Always use their preferred name, pronoun, and gender. If you don’t know and it’s an appropriate setting, just ask them. If it’s not an appropriate time to ask, avoid using specific pronouns all together. [ENTER]
  • So here’s an example of avoiding specific pronouns. [ENTER] Take a look at this original sentence. “She called and said she would be late to her game.” That sentence has three gender specific pronouns! Lets look at a different way to say the same thing without using specific pronouns. [ENTER] “From our phone call conversation, I was informed they would be late to the game.” We just eliminated three gender specific pronouns and replaced them with one gender neutral pronoun. It might take some thinking on your part but the more you practice that, the easier it will be. [ENTER]
  • [ENTER] If you slip up, don’t cause a scene. This is going to draw a lot more attention to the slip up and cause everyone involved to feel even more awkward. Just apologize, correct your mistake, and move on. If you don’t realize you’ve slipped up until later, wait until you can apologize to the person alone and let them know “hey I didn’t mean to refer to you that way, I’m sorry. ” But again, don’t make a big deal about it and then do your very best to not slip up in the future. [ENTER]
  • So here’s an example of how to handle a slip up. [ENTER] “We were just talking and she said…” At this point you immediately realize what you just said, but not all hope is lost! You can correct your mistake really simply. Just say, “I’m sorry, he said we would go get dinner first.” Simple, everyone is back on track, and no one is made to feel even more awkward about the situation. [ENTER]
  • [ENTER] Try to avoid “Non-pliments.” “What’s a non-pliment?” you might be wondering. Non-pliments are things people say that are intended to be compliments that really aren’t very nice things to say at all. [ENTER]
  • An example of this might be: [ENTER] “Wow! For a chick/dude, you look really good!” [ENTER] “I would have never guessed you were born a girl/boy!”[ENTER] “You look so much better than that other person who transitioned…”[ENTER] “You look waaaaay better now than you did before…”Even though these statements might be intended as compliments, they can be extremely hurtful in their own ways so just be careful how you offer your compliments.
  • [ENTER] Trans* people are mentally-ill and/or confused. [ENTER] People who identify as one particular identity will want the same things and have the same narratives.[ENTER] Trans* people are hyper sexual.[ENTER] Most Trans* people have been abused.[ENTER] All Trans* people will seek medical interventions.[ENTER] All people’s gender identities and expressions are congruent.
  • Try to avoid saying things like: [ENTER] “Are you sure about this?” Or commenting on the irreversibility of transition.[ENTER] “This is just really hard for me…” or how uncomfortable their identity makes you. It may take some adjusting but you can do it. [ENTER] “If you did this, it would help you pass better as a man/women.” Don’t try to help a trans* person “pass.”[ENTER] “Trans* people are so attractive/sexy! This is called fetishizing and tokenizing and even though Trans* people are unique and sexy in their own ways, it’s not appropriate to fetishize anyone based off things like race, gender, background, culture, and the like.[ENTER] “Everyone is Trans* these days…” It might be true that more Trans* people are coming to terms with their identities in society today, but that’s not because it’s becoming trendy – it’s because we are finally becoming educated and finding confidence to step out as our true selves in society.
  • Bottom line, [ENTER] People who identify as Trans* are just like everyone else and they want the same things.[ENTER] To be loved, [ENTER] respected, [ENTER] and treated like any other human being…
  • [ENTER] That’s it for this presentation; does anyone have any questions?

Trans 101 Trans 101 Presentation Transcript

  • Presenter: *Insert Name Here*
  • Overview • Define Trans* • Discuss – Gender Binary – Gender Identity – Gender Expression • Difference Between Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity • Outline Some Commonly Used Gender Identities • Ways to Ask Questions • How to Refer to a Trans* Individual Appropriately • Common Myths and Stereotypes • Things to Avoid • Q & A
  • What does Trans* even mean? • Trans* is an “Umbrella Term” • Encompasses all who do not conform to the gender binary
  • But, what is the Gender Binary? • The cataloging of sex and gender into two distinct and disconnected forms of masculine and feminine. What is Cisgender? • Individuals who’s self-perception of their gender matches the sex they were assigned at birth. What are Gender Roles? • The public image of being male or female that a person presents to others. – Note: These will be different depending on location/culture.
  • Wait, gender identity and gender expression are different? • Gender Identity is how someone identifies their own gender. – Boy – Girl – Transgender – Gender Queer – Etc • Gender Expression refers to how a person expresses their gender. – Clothing – Mannerisms – Behavior – Speech Patterns – Etc
  • Fact or myth: Gender identity determines your sexual orientation? MYTH! A person’s gender identity may help develop a label for their sexual orientation but it does not determine who they may be attracted to.
  • Difference between Gender Identity and Sexual orientation? • Sexual orientation describes an individual's enduring physical, romantic, emotional, and/or spiritual attraction to another person.
  • Fact or Myth: Gender and Sex are not the same thing. FACT! Sex refers to a person’s biological anatomy where as gender refers to a person’s psychological identity.
  • Gender Identities (not all inclusive!) • Transgender (Adjective): – Identifies with a gender other then their birth assigned gender. • Proper use: They are Transgender. • Improper: They are a Transgender. • Never use as past tense. • Male to Female/Female to Male (Adjective): – Someone who was assigned one gender at birth but identifies with the opposite gender.
  • Gender Identities (not all inclusive!) • Gender Queer (Adjective): – Refers to a person who feels that their gender changes or is fluid. • Intersex (Adjective): – Describes a person whose biological sex is ambiguous. • Androgynous/Gender Neutral (adjective): – Neither masculine nor feminine.
  • List of Gender Expressions (not all inclusive!) • Feminine • Masculine • Drag • Butch • Femme • Cross-Dresser • Androgynous
  • Sex/Gender/Sexual Orientation Triangle Sex (Body/Biology) • Chromosomes, genitals, hor mones, reproductive organs, secondary sex characteristics. Gender (Culture) • Gender expression, gender roles, gender identity • Gender conforming, transgender • MTF, FTM, Gender Queer, man, transsexual, w omen Sexual Orientaion (Attractions/Relationships) • Sexual desire, sexual behavior, sexual identity. • Asexual, gay, pansexual, two spirit, heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian, etc.
  • If I have a question for a Trans* person, how should I address them? First off, try to self-reflect. Why are you asking the question? Is it something you need to know? Is it a topic you could research on your own? Is it appropriate for the relationship you hold with them? Note: Being curious is natural but always be respectful.
  • If I have a question for a Trans* person, how should I address them? • Before asking specific questions, always seek permission from the individual. • Do not assume a person is taking specific actions in relation to their gender identity. • Start with questions like, “Where are you in your journey?” in order to avoid making assumptions.
  • How to refer to a Trans* person • Always use their preferred name/pronoun/gender, or avoid using specific references at all.  If you don’t know…ask politely!
  • Example Original Sentence: “She called and said she would be late to her game.” New Sentence: “From our phone call conversation, I was informed they would be late to the game.”
  • How to refer to a Trans* person • Always use their preferred name/pronoun/gender, or avoid using specific references at all.  If you don’t know…ask politely! • If you “slip up” don’t make a big deal about it.  Apologize, correct yourself, and move on.
  • Example “We were just talking and she said… I’m sorry, he said we would go get dinner first.”
  • How to refer to a Trans* person • Always use their preferred name/pronoun/gender, or avoid using specific references at all.  If you don’t know…ask politely! • If you “slip up” don’t make a big deal about it.  Apologize, correct yourself, and move on. • Avoid “Non-pliments.”  those are intended compliments that can be taken offensively
  • Examples • “Wow! For a chick/dude, you look really good!” • “I would have never guessed you were born a girl/boy!” • “You look so much better than that other person who transitioned…” • “You look waaaaay better now than you did before…”
  • Common Stereotypes and Myths • Trans* people are mentally-ill and/or confused. • People who identify as one particular identity will want the same things and have the same narratives. • Trans* people are hyper sexual. • Most Trans* people have been abused. • All Trans* people will seek medical interventions. • All people’s gender identities and expressions are congruent.
  • Try to avoid saying… • “Are you sure about this?” • “This is just really hard for me…” • “If you did this, it would help you pass better as a man/women.” • “Trans* people are so attractive/sexy!” • “Everyone is Trans* these days…”
  • Bottom line: People who identify as Trans* are just like everyone else and they want the same things: To be loved, respected, and treated like any other human being…
  • Questions?