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Radisys hosted this webinar on July 9, 2014: VoLTE in Asia Pacific - from Delay to Deploy. Ray Adensamer reviews VoLTE activity in the APAC region Ray discusses the industry hesitancy around VoLTE and …

Radisys hosted this webinar on July 9, 2014: VoLTE in Asia Pacific - from Delay to Deploy. Ray Adensamer reviews VoLTE activity in the APAC region Ray discusses the industry hesitancy around VoLTE and walk throught a business case example.

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  • 1. VoLTE in Asia Pacific from Delay to Deploy Radisys Webinar July 9, 2014 Ray Adensamer Director of Marketing, Radisys ray,adensamer@radisys.com
  • 2. Topics  VoLTE Activity in APAC Region  Industry Hesitancy around VoLTE…. Why?  Business Case for deploying VoLTE  Considerations for the IMS MRF in your VoLTE Deployment
  • 3. LTE is fastest growing Mobile Broadband Technology Source: 2G, 3G, LTE Mobile Services and Subscribers Infonetics, June, 2014 Regional Mobile Broadband Subscribers – by Technology Worldwide Mobile Broadband Subscribers – by Technology
  • 4. Top LTE Operators Worldwide Source: 2G, 3G, LTE Mobile Services and Subscribers Infonetics, June, 2014 Other 36,500,000 Total 205,000,000
  • 5. LTE Subscribers by Region Source: 2G, 3G, LTE Mobile Services and Subscribers Infonetics, June, 2014
  • 6. But what about VoLTE?  LTE growth is exceptional • Primary driver is faster data speeds for 3G network offload.  However, VoLTE service launches are lagging (Korea is one notable exception…)
  • 7. VoLTE Market Opportunity Source: VoLTE and OTT Mobile VoIP Services and Subscribers Infonetics, June, 2014 0 500 1000 1500 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Subscribers(millions) LTE and VoLTE Subscriber forecast LTE VoLTE
  • 8. VoLTE Success in Korea  Korea is the early world leader in LTE deployments • Quick to achieve high LTE subscriber penetration across country • ASIDE: Radisys small cell technology in Korean LTE deployments  Quickly followed by VoLTE launches in 2012 • SK Telekom, KT, LG Uplus  High LTE penetration facilitated VoLTE deployment success • Minimized need for CSFB and SRVCC • Resulted in good VoLTE adoption • Korean users “hearing” benefit of HD audio quality • ARPU up!
  • 9. VoLTE Launches  2012: • SK telecom (~15M LTE, 8M VoLTE Subs) • LG U+ (~9M LTE) • KT (~8M LTE)  2013: • T-Mobile US  2014: • PCCW Hong Kong • 3 Hong Kong • AT&T • SingTel All Launched in May 2014 Source: VoLTE and OTT Mobile VoIP Services and Subscribers Infonetics, June, 2014
  • 10. VoLTE Plans in Japan and China Japan • NTT DoCoMo has large LTE deployment today (~21M subs). – On June 24, 2014 launched their VoLTE service • KDDI Au 4G LTE service has 15M LTE subscribers – VoLTE launch planned for later in 2014. China • China Mobile deploying LTE services – China Mobile will launch VoLTE, RCS and updated audio RBT to VoLTE by end of 2014 • China Unicom and China Telecom – considering VoLTE in future
  • 11. Poll Question Are you using VoLTE services today? A. Yes - Using VoLTE today. B. No - VoLTE is available in my geographic country or region, but currently not using VoLTE services. C. No - VoLTE services not available.
  • 12. Summary of LTE and VoLTE activity 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Subscribers(millions) LTE and VoLTE Subscriber forecast LTE VoLTE  LTE is fastest growing mobile broadband technology • Broad support and rollout plans in all global markets • Both GSM and CDMA operators moving to LTE  Primary driver has been fast data speeds, and 3G data offload  But VoLTE launches are lagging LTE rollout.  Korea has shown the world the benefits of broad LTE deployment, and increasing ARPU through VoLTE services Majority of world’s operators have been slow to deploy VoLTE. Why?....
  • 13. Topics  VoLTE Activity in APAC Region  Industry Hesitancy around VoLTE…. Why?  Business Case for deploying VoLTE  Considerations for the IMS MRF in your VoLTE Deployment
  • 14. 14Radisys Corporation Confidential Industry Hesitancy to deploy IMS for VoLTE Why? Perceptions against VoLTE investments Reality Voice is a flat/declining revenue stream • Still the largest contributor to mobile operator revenues and profitability Use CSFB for voice services on LTE 3G networks work fine for voice • Data falls back to 3G speeds as well. • VoLTE call setup much faster. • VoLTE sounds better. • Early VoLTE deployments prove operators can charge premium and increase ARPU. VoLTE handsets not ready, limited selection, poor battery life • 2H14 will see increasing variety of VoLTE devices with improved battery life IMS systems, and associated integration, is costly and complex • Myopic focus on IMS investment only, limits understanding of broader business case benefits…
  • 15. 15Radisys Corporation Confidential Internet High-Level Comparison of Mobile Network Technology ATM/SONET Circuit Core (Voice) IP Packet Core (Data) Enhanced Packet Core (Voice, Video, Broadband Data) 3G Mobile LTE IP Access Internet IMS Proprietary Voice Service Platforms VoLTE TAS MRF IMS = IP Multimedia Subsystem TAS = Telecom Application Server MRF = Media Resource Function • Two separate voice and data networks to manage • Voice Services supported on separate, proprietary service platforms • One converged EPC for all IP services simplifies management • Open IMS supports VoLTE, with other interactive multimedia services • OneMRF for all services VoLTE strategy facilitates migration to converged EPC, achieving OPEX savings
  • 16. 16Radisys Corporation Confidential Is an IMS expensive? Compared to 4G spectrum – No! Motivation for the CFO: A VoLTE deployment can reduce or defer new 4G spectrum purchases, easily justifying an IMS investment for VoLTE
  • 17. Summary: Motivations to Deploy VoLTE  Voice still the “Killer App”  Single IP network  Spectrum Refarming  Revenue Upside beyond VoLTE services  Better call quality  Lower call setup times
  • 18. 18Radisys Corporation Confidential Topics  VoLTE Activity in APAC Region  Industry Hesitancy around VoLTE…. Why?  Business Case for deploying VoLTE  Considerations for the IMS MRF in your VoLTE Deployment
  • 19. 19Radisys Corporation Confidential Triggers for Change  LTE leading to converged IP network for mobile industry  VoLTE driving need for IMS • IMS provides opportunity for Common Media Resource Function (MRF)  Video services • Existing media processing resources often don’t support video  Cloud deployment • Increasing requirements for media processing in Cloud  OTT and carrier networks are blending/overlapping • Internet users getting telecom services (WebRTC) • Telecom service providers reaching out to Internet users Increasing requirements for reusable, efficient media processing infrastructure
  • 20. 20Radisys Corporation Confidential Real-time IP Media Processing The Foundation for many Communication Services Question? What do all these communication services have in common?
  • 21. 21Radisys Corporation Confidential Real-time IP Media Processing The Foundation for many Communication Services Question? What do all these communication services have in common? Answer: They all share an underlying need for real-time IP-based voice and video RTP media processing One Common MRF, shared amongst all Real-time Communication Services.
  • 22. 22Radisys Corporation Confidential Summary – One MRF Strategy  LTE and IMS • Deploying LTE and IMS requires MRF that delivers common features and services across access networks and applications.  As you deploy additional real-time communication services… • Business objective is efficient and scalable reuse of media resources • VoLTE, WebRTC, Transcoding, Conferencing, plus many more… – all can and should use same Common MRF The more services that share the MRF, the bigger the benefits
  • 23. 23Radisys Corporation Confidential Traditional Service Platforms Limited Media Processing Reuse • Play Media <video> • Collect Digits <Selection> • Transcode <video> • Play Media <audio> • Collect Digits <PIN> • Transcode <audio, video> • Mixing <audio, video> Media Processing Media Processing Signaling Media IVVR can’t reuse Conferencing Resources Conferencing can’t reuse IVVR resources IVVR Conferencing • Execute IVVR dialog with end user • Verify PIN • Mix Media for Conference Participants IVVR Call Logic Conferencing Call Logic
  • 24. 24Radisys Corporation Confidential IMS Principles – Step 1 Decouple Application from Media Processing • Execute IVVR dialog with end user • Verify PIN • Mix Media for Conference Participants IVVR Call Logic Media Processing Conferencing Call Logic Media Processing Signaling Media Media Control Media Control IVVR Conferencing • Play Media <video> • Collect Digits <Selection> • Transcode <video> • Play Media <audio> • Collect Digits <PIN> • Transcode <audio, video> • Mixing <audio, video>
  • 25. 25Radisys Corporation Confidential IMS Principles – Step 2 Share Media Processing across Applications IVVR Conferencing Shared Media Processing Signaling Media Media Control • Play Media <audio, video> • Collect Digits <Selection, PIN> • Transcode <audio, video> • Mixing <audio, video> • Execute IVVR dialog with end user • Verify PIN • Mix Media for Conference Participants IVVR Call Logic Conferencing Call Logic
  • 26. 26Radisys Corporation Confidential EPC Switch Media Processing decisions for new services often done in isolation IMS MTAS Mr/Mr’ - SIP Mp - H.248 MRF E.g. start with VoLTE and RCS  Applications run on IMS MTAS (Mobile Telephony Application Server)  Media processing done in IMS MRF  RTP streams connect to Enhanced Packet Core (EPC)  IMS MRF has management system(s), which integrate with BSS/OSS
  • 27. 27Radisys Corporation Confidential EPC Switch Adding more services usually means more media processing platforms AS Video CONF IMS MTAS AS VAS AS Audio CONF SIP MSML SIP MSML SIP VXML MRF Audio CONF MRF Video CONF MRF VoLTE MRF VAS More Services…  Multimedia Conferencing  Voice/Video Messaging  Video RBT  IVVR  Mobile Adverts Result?  More Application Servers  More MRF resources and vendors SIP, H.248
  • 28. 28Radisys Corporation Confidential EPC Switch WebRTC Services Also Need Media Processing AS Video CONF IMS MTAS AS VAS Web Comms Server AS Audio CONF SIP MSML SIP MSML SIP VXML MRF Audio CONF MRF Video CONF MRF VoLTE MRF VAS Web Media Processing JSR-309, REST  WebRTC services will required similar media processing Additional Requirements  New Codecs • VP8, OPUS  Web-friendly APIs • JSR-309 • REST SIP, H.248
  • 29. 29Radisys Corporation Confidential EPC Switch VoLTE and WebRTC Transcoding AS Video CONF IMS MTAS Transcode Controller AS VAS Web Comms Server AS Audio CONF SIP MSML SIP MSML H.248 SIP VXML RFC 4117 B2BUA No Control MRF Audio CONF MRF Video CONF B2BUA Media Transcoding MRF VoLTE MRF VAS Web Media Processing Media Transcoding JSR-309, REST • Transcoding critical to scalable WebRTC services • Audio: AMR-WB (VoLTE) <-> OPUS (WebRTC), • Video: H.264 720p (3GPP) <-> VP8 (WebRTC) • Transcoding in Decomposed Border Architectures • Separate Media Path from Signalling Layer • Core vs Edge Transcoding • 3PCC vs Inline (B2BUA)
  • 30. 30Radisys Corporation Confidential EPC Switch RESULT? Proliferation of Media Processing AS Video CONF IMS MTAS Transcode Controller AS VAS Web Comms Server Many Communication Applications AS Audio CONF SIP MSML SIP MSML SIP VXML RFC 4117 B2BUA Many Media Processing Platforms Many OSS/BSS systems and integrations MRF Audio CONF MRF Video CONF B2BUA Media Transcoding MRF VoLTE MRF VAS Web Media Processing Media Transcoding JSR-309, REST SIP, H.248
  • 31. 31Radisys Corporation Confidential Solution: Many Mobile Applications Sharing Common MRF B2BUA Transcode One Common MRF MRF EPC Switch Codec Y Minimize OPEX with One Common MRF, Shared amongst all real-time IMS, web, and transcoding requirements. Codec X AS Video CONF AS VoLTE MTAS Transcode Controller AS VAS Web Comms Server Many Communication Applications AS Audio CONF SIP MSML SIP MSML SIP VXML JSR-309, REST RFC 4117 One OSS/BSS One MRF  Multi-Service  Multi-Media  Multi-Control Protocol  Multi-Codec  HW, SW, or Cloud  Consistency of Media Delivery/QoS SIP, H.248
  • 32. Radisys MRF available in various form factors MPX-12000 Software MRF Broadband MRF with built-in HW reliability and best densities Best scalability using Linux and COTS HW Virtualized Media Processing Virtualized deployment for Cloud, OTT and WebRTC (KVM, VMware) MPX-OS The unified architecture and code base used in all our products that provides partners and customers an unparalleled portfolio of MRF’s offering common… • Media Processing Features • Control Interface Options • Management Capabilities
  • 33. 33Radisys Corporation Confidential Radisys MRF Voice Quality Enhancement (VQE) VoIP Audio Quality Challenge Radisys VQE Solution Benefit Noise  Noise Gating  Noise Reduction  Noisy Line Detection  Improved VoIP audio quality  Accelerated Subscriber Growth  Maximized Revenue Growth  Reduced Customer Churn Packet Loss  Packet Loss Concealment Acoustic Echo  Acoustic Echo Cancellation (AEC) Monitoring and Reporting  Audio Metrics  Packet Metrics  AEC Metrics  Improved Monitoring Capability  Better management support for SLAs
  • 34. Radisys WebRTC Capabilities  WebRTC to SIP Interworking • Transcoding, Transrating, and Interworking between – WebRTC and VoLTE (SIP) endpoints – Between VP8 and H.264, H.263, MPEG-4 • Applicable for IMS or OTT delivery WebRTC SIP SIP Client  WebRTC endpoint support • Radisys MRF supports VP8 video codec • Service examples: Streaming, RBT, VoD, Video Adverts WebRTC  Unified Collaboration • Mix WebRTC and SIP endpoints • Flexible switched video or CP displays • Automatic transcoding and transrating • Applicable for IMS or OTT delivery
  • 35. Transcoding Deployment Flexibility Radisys MRF SIP/MSML RFC 4117 H.248 CSCF RTP RTP 3PCC 3rd Party Call Control  Control interface options for IMS CSCF control • RFC 4117 SIP (transcoding only) • SIP/MSML (full MRF feature control) • H.248  Benefits:  Only calls requiring transcoding get treatment (not all calls)  Per-stream control of services media processing and media conditioning SIP SIP Radisys MRF RTP RTP B2BUA InLine via Back-to-Back User Agent (B2BUA)  Deploy direct in call path  MRF includes B2BUA for SIP signalling interpretation • No external control required • Selective media conditioning based on rules and triggers • No increase in signaling on the adjacent SBCs
  • 36. Market Leadership in IP Media Processing Enabling Real-time Audio and Video Communications for mobile operators, & web/OTT service providers 20+ Some of our Customers #1 Global Market Share Leader1 1- Source: Service Provider VoIP and IMS Equipment and Subscribers, Media Server/MRF, 4Q12, Infonetics Other US, EUROPE & ASIA
  • 37. Copyright© 2014 - Radisys Corporation all powered by Mavenir’s mOne Convergence Platform enabled by… Many VoLTE deployments underway… Media Resource Function (IMS MRF)
  • 38. Benefits of working with Radisys  Benefits for Service Providers • One MRF platform for all real-time revenue generating services. • The more services sharing a single MRF platform… …. the better your operational savings.  Benefits for Telecom Service Developers • You focus on IMS call control, orchestration, and integration. • Partner with Radisys for your IP media processing requirements. Enabling Wireless Infrastructure Solutions www.radisys.com/mrf info@radisys.com For More Information
  • 39. Thank You! Ray Adensamer Director of Marketing, Radisys ray,adensamer@radisys.com Questions? Available for download from http://go.radisys.com/ebookVoLTEfromDelaytoDeploy Please complete the short survey at the end of the webinar