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Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect
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Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Presented by Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect

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ETSI Workshop – RCS VoLTE and Beyond …

ETSI Workshop – RCS VoLTE and Beyond
Kranj, Slovenia
October 11, 2012

Adnan Saleem discusses the advantages of moving to VoLTE/RCS for mixed mobile operators – and addresses the key challenges along the way.

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  • 1. Leveraging IMS for VoLTE and RCS Services in LTE Networks Adnan Saleem, Chief Architect ETSI Workshop – RCS, VoLTE, and Beyond Kranj, Slovenia, October 11, 2012
  • 2. Topics  Journey from TDM to Packet World • The Myth and the Reality  Advantages of Moving to VoLTE/RCS for Fixed and Mobile Operators  Leveraging IMS Core Network for VoLTE/RCS • A Truly Converged Network  Ensuring the Best Media Experience Radisys Corporation Confidential 2
  • 3. Corporate Overview - Global Footprint Dublin Gdansk Vancouver Tokyo Hillsboro San Diego Boston Shanghai Barcelona Shenzhen Bangalore Penang Research & Development Centers Sales/ Support Offices Manufacturing Site Radisys Corporation Confidential 3
  • 4. Corporate OverviewMedia Server (MRF/AS) Business Snapshot  NASDAQ Listed: RSYS IP Media Servers Solutions  ~ $350M per year Revenue  Conferencing  ~ 950 employees  Network Services  Markets Served  IMS MRF  Telecom / Networking  Ringback Tones  Aerospace / Defence  IVVR  Medical  Transcoding  Automation IP Media Servers IP Media Servers Leadership Customers Source: Infonetics Research, Service Provider VoIP Equipment and Subscriber Market Share and Forecasts - CY10 Radisys Corporation Confidential 4
  • 5. Radisys Supplies Products forEnd-to-End LTE Infrastructure Radio Access Network Evolved Packet Core Policy Control IP Multimedia Subsystem Policy & User Mobility Charging IMS Equipment Management Routing Entity Function Home eNodeB Application Media Server Resource Function User Policy & Equipment Charging Enforcement Internet Function eNodeB LTE Security Serving Packet Gateway Gateway Gateway 60+ Customer Wins 10G  40G ATCA Traffic Management VoLTE  Video VAS Macro  Small Cells ~40% ATCA Share Dumb  Smart Pipes ~65% Audio Conf Share Radisys Corporation Confidential 5
  • 6. Delivering Voice (and Video) … TDM to VoIP to VoLTE/RCS …  IP Packet Networks Originally Designed for Data  Voice Originally Delivered over TDM networks • Dedicated channel for duration of the call • Voice Delivery Separate from IP network • Diversity of Network Elements to Support IP vs TDM traffic  2G/3G Networks Also Delivered Voice over Separate Circuit Infrastructure • Separated Access for Voice and Data Services  TDM Significantly Limited the Ability to Integrate Voice with Other Services • Result -> Lots of Limitations of Service Capabilities and Unified Offerings Radisys Corporation Confidential 6
  • 7. Advantages of VoLTE and RCS  Reduced Cost and Complexity of Network • Single All IP Network for Voice, Video, and Other Data Services • IMS Core Network Enables Resource Sharing  Eliminates the Need for 2 Separate Networks • Initially Circuit Switched Fallback, But Migrating to all IP • Reuse of IMS Core Network for Resource Sharing  Unified Services via VoLTE and RCS • Common IP Network with IMS Simplifies Unified Services Innovations, Multiple Applications with Common Media  Monetizing Enhanced Value Added Services  Counter or Collaborate With Over the Top Services Radisys Corporation Confidential 7
  • 8. VoLTE: Essential for LTE success  Voice is still an essential component and necessary to LTE’s success  VoLTE needed to decrease dependency on legacy networks  Concurrent voice and data connectivity is a driver to deploy VoLTE soon Source: Senza Fili survey, sponsored by Radisys“Circuit-switched voice is not going to disappear over the next five years. But we do need VoLTE to gradually reduce our dependency from legacy 3G and 2G networks.” – APAC survey participant Radisys Corporation Confidential 8
  • 9. Problem:Data Growth Outpacing Revenues Capacity Mind The Gap Revenue vs. Traffic Growth Traffic Revenues & Traffic Gap Widening Voice Era Revenues Data Era  Traffic Doubling every 12 months  Must Increase ARPU  VideoTextOperators’ Albatross =  Must Lower Cost per Bit Source: Cisco VNI Source: Heavy Reading Radisys Corporation Confidential 9
  • 10. Solution:The Path to Revenue Growth  Large Investments in LTE Infrastructure • Investment Recovery Largely via Broadband Data Plans  But Revenues Need to Grow Beyond Data Plans • Supplement via VoLTE, RCS, Other Value Added Services  VoLTE, RCS, and other VAS driving need for IMS  Media Plane Processing in IMS driving need for MRF Radisys Corporation Confidential 10
  • 11. VoLTE Use Cases Requiring MRF Most VoLTE pt-to-pt calls do not need MRF • If both ends have same codec, then established call path doesn’t pass through MRF But many VoLTE services need MRF • Basic Network Services – Playing a network announcement (basic service) – Collecting digits with announcements (IVR) – IP-to-IP transcoding (e.g. AMR-WB <-> AMR-NB) • Revenue-Generating VAS services – Playing a ringback tone – Messaging (record and playback) – Conferencing – Branded advertising – And many more…. Radisys Corporation Confidential 11
  • 12. MRF in LTE IMS Core Deployments GPRS Core Services in 2/2.5G Packet Data Network (Getran) SGSN HSS PCRF BSC AS AS Rx CSCF 3G IMS (UTRAN) ISC Mr Mr’/Cr Core RNC MME 4G/LTE Mb MRF eNodeB Evolved Packet Core SGW PGW Internet Multiple Applications (MMTel AS, RCS AS, Conferencing) Corporate Intranets VoLTE/RCS and 3GPP Standards Compliance Scalable HD Video and Transcoding for Mass Deployment, Multiple Device Types MRF Reuse Across Multiple Media Applications Radisys Corporation Confidential 12
  • 13. MRF in 3GPP IMS Architecture AS AS AS Services Application Layer Creation Control HSS S- Control Layer CSCF Mr Mr’/Cr PCR S- MGCF/ F IBCF CSCF SGF MRF LTE RACS Access PDF Mp Mp MRFC IBGF GGSN/ Mb Mb Internet BAS/ A-BGF IMS- PGW Bearer/ GW MRFP Media Plane SGSN/ Non-LTE MGW Access SGW Access Layer BSC RNC CMTS DSLAM WAG eNode B 2G Wireless 3G Wireless Cable DSL WLAN PSTN 4G/LTE • MRF Provides Media Plane Resource for All IMS Applications • LTE and Non-LTE Access Networks Radisys Corporation Confidential 13
  • 14. MRF Characteristics in VoLTE End to End IP (No CS Domain Voice) • Increases and exposes network bandwidth variability from end terminals directly to MRF (i.e., no CS-IP MGW) Key Aspects of MRF in LTE and non-LTE Deployments • IMS-based All-IP voice and video (multiservice MRF) • Service continuity with legacy 2G/3G handsets (via IMS GWs) • High availability with low latency and jitter (media quality) • New services for increased revenues (app-independent MRF reuse) MRF: Essential Resource for VoLTE Supplementary Services • Network voice services (Ann, IVR, RBT) • Two-way or multi-party (conferencing) • Voice quality for IP mobile environment • Media recording / Legal Intercept • Media transcoding / adaptation Radisys Corporation Confidential 14
  • 15. VoLTE and Video MRF – Challenges 1. High variability in mobile access network 2. Packet loss due to fading 3. Increased delay and echo 4. Increased number and diversity of codecs 5. Increasing need for policy-based controls 6. Increasing density and bandwidth needs 7. Coexistence of IPv6 and IPv4 in 4G / LTE 8. Managing QoS and congestion, end-to-end 9. Voice Quality Enhancements in an All-IP network 10. Reusability across diverse IMS applications Radisys Corporation Confidential 15
  • 16. Trends and Impacts on MRF Design Mobile Data Bandwidth Mobile Data Bandwidth LTE MRF Requirements  Broadband, but highly variable  Support for 2-way Interactive Services  QoS and Policy Enforcement  Support for 1-way Streaming Services  Dynamic Rate Adaptation, Adaptive Bitrates  Policy Enforcement Functions via PCRF Bandwidth Policy Control Resource Function (PCRF) AS time IMS Core 4G IP Handsets (IPv6) Evolved Multimedia Packet LTE Packet Content 2-way (RTP, RTCP) Core Network Radio Access Network 1-way (HTTP, RTMP, RTSP) Radisys Media Server (LTE IMS MRF) Radisys Corporation Confidential 16
  • 17. Trends and Impacts on MRF Design Mobile Applications Mobile Applications LTE MRF Requirements  Growing 3rd party applications and cloud  Network-based MRF under services based on network MRF services, 3rd party network or device applications exposed by Open APIs  Growing interest in MRB (Media Resource Broker) 3rd Party 3rd Party Network Application Network Device Server(s) Applications MRF Applications Resources Open Application APIs Application Network CSCF MRF Server(s) Resources Open Application APIs Evolved Media Resource Broker Packet (MRB) LTE Packet Core Network IMS Core Radio Access Network MRF Resource Radisys Pool Media Server (LTE IMS MRF) Radisys Corporation Confidential 17
  • 18. MRF for IP-IP Transcoding 3rd Party Call Control (3PCC) Control interface options  Benefits: • RFC 4117 SIP (transcoding only)  Only calls requiring transcoding get treatment (not all calls) • SIP/MSML (full MS feature control)  Per-stream control of services media • H.248 processing and media conditioning Media Service Conditioning Provider Using 3rd CSCF IP Network Party Call Media Conditioning Control (3PCC) Media - Circuit Network AS SIP/MSML Media - Packet Network RFC 4117 H.248 SIP SIP Circuit SS7 Access Business IP VPN Network AMR AMR G.722 G.722 HD G.722 across enterprise (Circuit) (RTP) (RTP) (RTP) MGW MRF SBC Radisys Corporation Confidential 18
  • 19. MRF for IP-IP Transcoding “Inline” solution  Fits directly in call path  Benefits: • No external control required • Selective media conditioning based on rules and triggers “Inline” IP-IP Media Conditioning Using Back-to-Back Media Conditioning User Agents Service Media - Circuit Network (B2BUA) Provider IP Network Media - Packet Network Business IP Circuit SS7 SIP SIP SIP VPN Access HD G.722 across AMR AMR G.722 G.722 Network (Circuit) (RTP) (RTP) enterprise (RTP) MGW SBC MRF Radisys Corporation Confidential 19
  • 20. Trends and Impacts on MRF Design LTE Device Evolution LTE Device Evolution LTE MRF Requirements  More Devices, Increasing Capabilities  H.264 Video (Baseline to High Profiles)  Wideband Audio Codecs  MPEG-4  High-end Video  AMR-WB  … with dynamic transcoding / transrating 64 kbps 384 kbps – 768 kbps 768kbps – 3 Mbps 3+ Mbps (HD) (Synchronous up/down) (Synchronous up/down) Audio Video Narrowband -> Wideband -> Full Band Small Screens & Low Bitrates -> HD High Framerates GSMA IR.92 GSMA IR.94 Radisys Corporation Confidential 20
  • 21. IMS Services Core forVideo VAS and Conferencing SmartphoneSmall IP WAN Mobile BroadbandScreen 4G/LTE, WiFi, HSPAVideo Tablet Mobile Laptop IMS Services Core Wireline Broadband DSL, Cable HSS/PCRF Application Home Server (AS) Office (SMB) Enterprise UC Corporate Office IP VPN Call State Control Desktop Function (CSCF) Media Resource Video Corporate Content/ Function (MRF) HD HD Video Storage HeadVideo HD MCU Office Telepresence Radisys Corporation Confidential 21
  • 22. RCS Video Use Cases Radisys Corporation Confidential 22
  • 23. MPX-12000 – VoLTE MRFVideo & Voice over LTE  VoLTE Media Resource Function • High Definition Voice, including AMR-WB • VQE – critical media conditioning in noisy wireless environment  RTP media processing for RCS services  Conversational Video • Video calling – HD video 720p, H.264 • Video conferencing • Video Transcoding  Audio/Video VAS • Conferencing, Ringback, Multimedia mail…  Open 40G ATCA Platform "Mavenir has already integrated the Radisys CMS-9000 media server with our mOne Convergence Platform for one of our LTE operator deployments…. Products like the MPX-12000 – with a design objective to increase MRF media processing capacities for mobile video services – offers an enticing MRF product evolution for LTE operators" – Terry McCabe, CTO, Mavenir Systems Radisys Corporation Confidential 23
  • 24. LTE Mobile Networks Trends and Impacts on MRF Design Trends LTE MRF RequirementsNetwork Infrastructure • Flat, Distributed Architecture  IPv4/v6 support • Pure end-to-end IP Network  Centralized and Distributed MRFs • High Bandwidth I/OMobile Bandwidth  RTCP-XR  Broadband, but highly variable  Dynamic Rate Adaptation, Adaptive Bitrates  QoS and Policy Enforcement  PCRF – Rx interfaceLTE Device Evolution  More Devices, Increasing Capabilities  H.264 Video (high resolutions and bitrates)  Wideband Audio Codecs  H.265, VP8  High-end Video  AMR-WB, Ultra WidebandNetwork Services API’s for Web 2.0  Trends around 3rd party devices or  Network-based MRF under applications controlling network 3rd party application control services, exposed by APIs  Growing interest in MRB Radisys Corporation Confidential 24
  • 25. Embedded Wireless Infrastructure Solutions MSF IOT (MRF TEST CASES SUMMARY) October 01 – 12, 2012, Kranj, Slovenia
  • 26. MSF – VoLTE IOT (Scenario 1) Supplementary Services via MRF (MMTel and RCS AS) Basic Media Services (CSCF - MRF) IMS Core MMTel / RCS Ut Ut Application Mr’ MRF Servers Sh I S Mr Cx C HSS Cx P-CSCF Mw I/S-CSCF Sh Rx S6a DRA ENUM UE S6a Rx IMS UA Gx ENUM PCRF Server LTE-Uu Gx MME UE S1-MME LTE-Uu Sec- S11 IMS UA GW S1-U eNodeB S-GW S5 P-GW SGi Mb (RTP/RTCP) Figure 1 - Scenario 1 – Home/Single Network IMS/RCS Services Radisys Corporation Confidential 26
  • 27. MRF – Sample Call Flows (Ann and Conferencing)(Ref: 3GPP TS 23.849) Visited Network Home Network Home/Visited Network Home Network MRF AS S- CSCF MRF AS S- CSCF 1. Sess ion Initi ati on [1] 1. Sess ion Initi ation (ad-hoc conf) [1] 2. Session Init. (ad-hoc conf) [ 1] 2. Session Initiation [1] 3. Service Logic 3. Service Logic 4. Session Initiation [2] 4. MRB/MRF Service Discovery: 5. Session Failure - Provisioning from VPLMN at registration or session initiationPlay Tone 6. Session Failure [2] - Configuration in HPLMNor Ann 7. Service Logic MRB Multi Party 5a. Establish session via 8. MRB /MRF Service Discovery: MRB (new leg 2) Conference - Provisioning from VPLMN at registration or session initiation Mixer - Configuration in HPLMN 5b. Session Initiation to MRF via SCSCF , MRF selects - media resources (new leg 2) MRB 7. Session Init. 6. Session Init. (UE2) [3] (UE2) [3] 9a. Invoke MRF via MRB ( new leg ) 8. Establish path between UE and MRF 2 9. Repeat steps 5-11 for UE3 [4], [5] 10. Session Init. (UE1) [6] 9b. Session Initiation to MRF via S-CSCF , MRF selects 11. Session Initiation ( UE1) [6] media resources ( new leg) 12. 200OK(UE1) [6] 13. 200 OK ( UE1) [6] 10. Dialogue 1 is handled normally using the information from MRF 14. 200 OK ( UE1) [1] 11. QoS and resources are reserved 15. 200 OK(UE1) [1] 12. Play Tone/ Announcement 16. Establish path between UE and MRF 1 Radisys Corporation Confidential 27
  • 28. MRF: Service Identification & Triggering  CSCF-based Service Identification and Triggering  SIP methods, URI, Headers for Filter Criteria Ex: Ex: Multimedia MMTel or Conference AS RCS AS MRF MRF Ref: 3GPP TS 23.218 IM Call Model Stage 2 Release 11 Radisys Corporation Confidential 28
  • 29. MRF Test Case Additions (Scenario 1) Test Cases Based on 3GPP Mr and Mr’ Interfaces • SIP, SIP+XML, SIP+VoiceXML msf2012.117.00 S1b (VoLTE and MMTel) • S1b-26 (Audio Announcements) • S1b-27 (Audio Transcoding in Two-Party Call) • S1b-28 (Multiparty Audio Conferencing) • All Test Cases with Automatic Transcoding via MRF msf2012.118.00 S1c (RCS – Video Share) • S1c-52 (In Call Services – Video Share with Transrating) • S2c-53 (In Call Services – Video Share with Transcoding) • H.263, H.264, MPEG-4 Codecs with Transrating / Scaling S1d (Video Calls/Conferences) msf2012.119.00 • S1d-28 (Multiparty Multimedia Conference) • Voice Activated Switching with Multi-device Multi-codec Support • Interactive Voice and Video Response (IVVR) Radisys Corporation Confidential 29
  • 30. S1b-26 (Audio Announcements)  Audio (or Video) Announcements UE AS MRF (1) INVITE (SDP-UE) (2) INVITE “sip:annc” (SDP-UE) UE with Announcement (3) 100 Trying Varying (4) 100 Trying SourceAudio/Video Internal orCapabilities (5) 200 OK (SDP-MRF) External via(Eg: AMR, (6) 200 OK (SDP-MRF) HTTP or NFS AMR-WB, (7) ACK Server G.711) (8) ACK Play Multimedia Announcement (RTP) (9) BYE (10) BYE (11) 200 (12) 200 Figure 27 – Multimedia Announcement Message Flow Radisys Corporation Confidential 30
  • 31. S1b-27 (Transcoding in Two-Party Calls)  Audio (or Video) Transcoding (2-PTY Call) UE-A UE-B AS MRF (1) INVITE “sip:transcoding@target=UE-B” (SDP-A: G.711) (2) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-A: G.711) (3) 200 OK (SDP-MRF: G.711) (4) 200 OK (SDP-MRF: G.711)Ex: UE-A MRF (5) ACK (6) ACK(G.711) 2-PTY RTP (G.711) Transcoding (7) INVITE (8) 200 OK (SDP-B: AMR) (9) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-B: AMR) G.711 <-> AMR (10) 200 OK (SDP-MRF: AMR) Transcoding (11) ACK (SDP-MRF: AMR) (12) ACKEx: UE-B (AMR) RTP (AMR) Figure 28 – Transcoding in Two-Party Call Message Flow Radisys Corporation Confidential 31
  • 32. S1b-28 (Multiparty Conferencing)With Transcoding and Media Conditioning  Audio (or Video) Multiparty Conference Mix UE-A UE-B UE-C AS MRF MRF (1) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” (2) INVITE “sip:conf=123” Media (3) 200 OK (4) 200 OK Mixing (5) ACKUE-A, UE-B, (6) ACK and UE-C RTP (UE-A)May All Be (7) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” Different (8) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (9) 200 OK Codecs (10) 200 OK (11) ACK (12) ACK(Eg: EVRC,AMR, AMR- RTP (UE-B) Audio Mixing WB) RTP (UE-A) RTP (UE-B) (13) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” (14) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (15) 200 OK (16) 200 OK (17) ACK (18) ACK RTP (UE-C) RTP (UE-A + UE-B) RTP (UE-A + UE-C) RTP (UE-B + UE-C) Figure 29 – Three-Way Multimedia Conference Message Flow Radisys Corporation Confidential 32
  • 33. S1c-52 (In Call Services)RCS Video Share with Transrating  Video Share with Transrating (BW Optimization) UE-A UE-B AS MRF (1) INVITE “sip:video-share@target=UE-B” (SDP-A: H.264 1Mpbs, sendonly) (2) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-A: H.264 1Mpbs, sendonly) (3) 200 OK MRF (SDP-MRF: H.264 1Mpbs, recvonly) Video Share (4) 200 OK (SDP-MRF: H.264 1Mpbs, recvonly) Video Share (Send) with (5) ACKUE-A (1 Mbps) (6) ACK Transrating RTP (H.264 1Mbps) (7) INVITE (8) 200 OK (SDP-B: H.264 384kpbs,sendrecv) (9) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-B: H.264 384kbps, recvonly) 1 Mbps -> 384 kbps (10) 200 OK Transrating (SDP-MRF: H.264 384kpbs, sendonly) Video Share (11) ACK (Receive) (SDP-MRF: H.264 384kpbs, sendonly) (12) ACK UE-B (384 Kbps) RTP (H.264 384kbps) Figure 21 – In call Services – Video Share with Transrating Radisys Corporation Confidential 33
  • 34. S1c-53 (In Call Services)RCS Video Share with Transcoding  Video Share with Transcoding (Multi-device Support) UE-A UE-B AS MRF (1) INVITE “sip:video-share@target=UE-B” (SDP-A: H.263, sendonly) (2) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-A: H.263, sendonly)Video Share (3) 200 OK MRF (SDP-MRF: H.263, recvonly) (4) 200 OK (Send) (SDP-MRF: H.263, recvonly) Video ShareUE-A (H.263) with (5) ACK Eg: Laptop (6) ACK Transcoding RTP (H.263) (7) INVITE (8) 200 OK (SDP-B: H.264,sendrecv) (9) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (SDP-B: H.264, recvonly) H.263 -> H.264 Video Share (10) 200 OK Transcoding (SDP-MRF: H.264, sendonly) (Receive) (11) ACK UE-B (H.264) (SDP-MRF: H.264, sendonly) (12) ACK Eg: Tablet RTP (H.264) Figure 22 – In call Services – Video Share with Transcoding Radisys Corporation Confidential 34
  • 35. S1d-28 (Video Call)Three-Way Multimedia Conference  Multimedia Conference (Voice Activated Switching) MRF UE-A UE-B UE-C AS MRF (1) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” Multiparty (2) INVITE “sip:conf=123”UE-A, UE-B, (3) 200 OK Multimedia (4) 200 OKUE-C Join (5) ACK ConferenceMultimedia (6) ACKConference RTP (UE-A audio/video) (Voice Activated (Varying (7) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” (8) INVITE “sip:conf=123” Switching) Codecs , (9) 200 OK (10) 200 OKFrame and (11) ACK (12) ACK Bitrates) Audio Mixing & RTP (UE-B audio/video) Video Switching RTP (audio: UE-A; video: current or previous speaker) RTP (audio: UE-B; video: current or previous speaker) (13) INVITE “sip:public-conf-ID” (14) INVITE “sip:conf=123” (15) 200 OK (16) 200 OK (17) ACK (18) ACK RTP (UE-C audio/video) RTP (audio: UE-A + UE-B; video: current or previous speaker) RTP (audio: UE-A + UE-C; video: current or previous speaker) RTP (audio: UE-B + UE-C; video: current and previous speaker) Radisys Corporation Confidential 35
  • 36. Q&A Contact us! Adnan: adnan.saleem@radisys.com For more information on our products, visit: www.radisys.com THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING! Radisys Corporation Confidential 36

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